Preaching to Renew Lives

Charles Lipp

This series of podcasts is about the craft of preaching, specifically using TED talk methods and concepts to improve the craft of preaching. TED talks are about an "Idea work sharing", We believe the Gospel message of Jesus is the ultimate idea worth sharing. read less
Religion & SpiritualityReligion & Spirituality

Episodes

Sermon structure and editing the draft text
Feb 11 2023
Sermon structure and editing the draft text
In each episode we will explore effective ways to construct and deliver better sermons. In part, we will take lessons from the world of TED talks and apply them to level up preaching and teaching. The theme of TED is to share “Ideas worth spreading”. We also believe the ultimate idea worth sharing is the Gospel of Jesus the ChristYou do this every week; today, we take three steps back and consider the structure. The same structural framing applies to any message, a sermon in your congregation or a TED talk. Foundational is to connect to the audience and help them remember your message.The introduction should attract attention in the first minute or two. This initial part provides the context and setting of the message and explains why it is important. We presume you have done the exegesis on the scriptures used and read.A key takeaway from Podcast 1 was highlining the propositional statement or throughline (ted talk verbiage). Refining this message improves the TED talk or sermon.  Same for preaching thousands of sermons- this single aspect helps your congregation.Editing the sermon to drop side points helps deliver the message more powerfully. The most important part of the sermon is what you don’t say. This is what you have edited, and saved for future messages.The sound message structure is simple so that it is easy to follow. That does not trivialize the task of making the sermon a simple formula. A good structure has only a few road makers where you will turn. This makes it easy for you to remember and for your audience to stay connected to as you speak.Come Sunday night your thoughts begin on the next week’s message.Visuals emphasize memorable statements if you have visuals available. For some of us this is easy, but for most people, this takes soak time.—and sometimes asking others.The secret sauce of TEDx and TED talks is the coaching of the speakers. Coaching to evoke excellence that enhances authenticity. Coaching provides encouragement and validates the person—“we believe in you.”The dynamics of coaching, where possible focusing on the positive – do more of this. The fine-tuning often involves modest changes – the 10% tweak.As a pastor finding a coach is valuable but not easy.Thanks for listening—If you have thoughts on more topics, let us know.
Clarifying the Big Idea of a message
Oct 23 2022
Clarifying the Big Idea of a message
In each episode, we will explore practical ways to construct and deliver better sermons - encourage excellence. In part, we will take lessons from the world of TED talks and apply them to level up preaching and teaching.   TED-style talks are about an idea worth spreading; we believe the essential Idea worth sharing is the gospel message.  Sharing a compelling message begins with clarifying the “big idea” or propositional statement. Mike Rowe and Chuck Lipp discuss why the big Idea is essential and what it takes to find the big Idea.   Sometimes it is easy to express the big Idea, but it requires effort to say it in a sentence. The same is true for coaching TEDx talk speakers from Chuck Lipp’s experience as the TEDxLakeJuanluska Organizer. Succinctly expressing the Idea worth sharing can make the talk more powerful. Helping TEDx speakers develop their “idea worth sharing” is always a process with successive approximations. Clarifying the propositional statement will guide the development- eliminating good points that may be useful for other messages, but may obstruct this message. Mike suggests that sometimes ideas need to PERC: [Prayer, Examine, Research, and Collaborate] – with a discussion of each item. Referenced material The two books referenced are:Communicating for a Change: Seven Keys to Communication, 2006 by Andy Stanley, Ted Talks: The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking, 2016 by Chris Anderson