The Science of Happiness

PRX and Greater Good Science Center

Learn research-tested strategies for a happier, more meaningful life, drawing on the science of compassion, gratitude, mindfulness, and awe. Hosted by award-winning psychologist Dacher Keltner. Co-produced by PRX and UC Berkeley's Greater Good Science Center.

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Happiness Break: Feeling the Awe of Nature from Anywhere
2d ago
Happiness Break: Feeling the Awe of Nature from Anywhere
Host Dacher Keltner leads us through an exercise in feeling the serenity and wonder that nature brings us, no matter where we are. How to Do This Practice: Find a spot where you can sit and rest comfortably. Once you’re ready, close your eyes.Begin breathing slowly and deeply. Focus on your breath and unclench your muscles from head to toe.Think of a place in nature that is sacred or significant to you. What do you hear? What do you see? Try to create as clear of an image as you can in your mind.Notice what feelings arise as you think of this place; what feelings do you associate with it?Contemplate how this place has become a part of who you are; how it lives in your mind and how you can conjure up the feeling of it within yourself. Today’s Happiness Break host: Dacher Keltner is the host of the Greater Good Science Center’s award-winning podcast, The Science of Happiness and is a co-instructor of the GGSC’s popular online course of the same name. He’s also the founding director of the Greater Good Science Center and a professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. His new book is Awe: The New Science of Everyday Wonder and How It Can Transform Your Life. More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Secrets of the Vagus Nerve: https://tinyurl.com/yzuxtuzp Why We Should Look Up at the Sky (Podcast): https://tinyurl.com/fn3bttw6 What’s the Most Common Sense of Awe? https://tinyurl.com/2p842t8r Happiness Break: How to Ground Yourself: https://tinyurl.com/289ph9cz Happiness Break: Experience Nature Wherever You Are: https://tinyurl.com/yv46xrr4 Why You Should Snap Pictures of Nature: https://tinyurl.com/5fp7bhk6 Could Your Life Be More Awesome? Take our Awe Quiz https://tinyurl.com/2p8mz57f We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience of awe in nature. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Apple Podcasts: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap Help us share Happiness Break! Leave us a 5-star review and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
Why We Should Look Up at the Sky
19-01-2023
Why We Should Look Up at the Sky
When did you last take a moment to really look up at the sky? Shifting your gaze upward can help us be more creative, it improves our capacity to focus - and it's a gateway to awe. Episode summary: Natalie didn’t spend much time finding shapes in the clouds as a small kid. And when she got older, looking up was even worse for her. Natalie spent time in jail, where she spent most of her days indoors under harsh lights. Today, she’s a student at a prestigious university. She tried a practice in looking up for our show. When we look up, our brain gets better at being playful, creative, and thinking critically. We also tend to see vast and beautiful things above our heads, like a canopy of leaves, branches and singing birds, or a starry night sky. Often, looking up is all we need to do to find moments of awe in our day-to-day lives. And that’s a wonderful thing, because feeling awe changes how our brains work in a way that’s really good for us. This is the second episode of The Science of Happiness in a three-part series called The Science of Awe. If you’d like to learn more about awe, our host, Dacher Keltner, has a new book out about it. It’s called Awe: The New Science of Everyday Wonder and How It Can Transform Your Life. Learn more here: https://tinyurl.com/3uzk8m5r \](https://tinyurl.com/3uzk8m5r) Practice: Look Up Over the course of a week or so, make it a point to look up in several different locations and at different times of the day and night. Be sure everywhere you choose is a safe place to do so, and of course, never look into the sun.Each time before you look up, take a moment first to notice how you feel, and then take a few deep, intentional breaths to help you get grounded into the present moment.Look up and let your eyes wander, noticing what inspires awe. If nothing does, that’s ok! This practice might help you cultivate awe more often, but it’s best to go into it each time with no expectations. Spend at least a few minutes looking up if it’s comfortable to do so, or as long as you like.When you’re done, take another moment to notice how you feel now. Today’s guests: Natalie is a student at UC Berkeley and also works with the UC Berkeley's Underground Scholars Program, which creates pathways for formerly incarcerated people to study at universities. We're not sharing Natalie's last name to protect her privacy. Michiel van Elk is a professor at Leiden University in The Netherlands. Learn more about van Elk and his work: https://tinyurl.com/4kc5tycc Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How Nature Can Make You Kinder, Happier, and More Creative: https://tinyurl.com/yepuxd27 Six Ways to Incorporate Awe Into Your Daily Life: https://tinyurl.com/3emucdez How the Science of Awe Shaped Pixar’s “Soul:” https://tinyurl.com/37z43vrz How a Sense of Awe Can Inspire Us to Confront Threats to Humanity: https://tinyurl.com/3k6xprau More Resources About Awe KQED - Dacher Keltner on Finding Awe: https://tinyurl.com/575v6rvf The Atlantic  - The Quiet Profundity of Everyday Awe: https://tinyurl.com/yz623mff NYT - How a Bit of Awe Can Improve Your Health: https://tinyurl.com/4zdzcusk Sierra Club - The Science of Awe: https://tinyurl.com/3pfn23t7 Tell us about your experiences of awe. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts or share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap
Happiness Break: Awe for Others
12-01-2023
Happiness Break: Awe for Others
The communities we create are one of the most awe-inspiring parts of our lives. Host Dacher Keltner guides us in a meditation on awe and togetherness in this week’s Happiness Break. How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable, safe, place where you can close your eyes and relax. Notice your breathing and begin to take deep, intentional breaths.Think about a community you are a part of – work, recreation, spiritual, any group you’re a part of. Cultivate a sense in your mind of being with that community.Reflect for a few minutes on the faces of the people in this community; bring them into your mind’s eye and notice the details of their eyes, smiles, perhaps even their tones of voice or the sounds of their laughter.Think about this remarkable quality of communities: That all of these separate individuals create one hole.Think about how each person contributes to this community to create that whole.Contemplate how everyone in this community is connected, and how they’re mutually influencing each other.Think about what value unites all these people share, what they have in common.Imagine yourself within this network of connected individuals. Cultivate a sense of what connects you with them, think of them as threads of mutual influence. It doesn’t all have to be good; tension is a part of being a community, too. Today’s Happiness Break host: Dacher Keltner is the host of the Greater Good Science Center’s award-winning podcast, The Science of Happiness and is a co-instructor of the GGSC’s popular online course of the same name. He's also the founding director of the Greater Good Science Center and a professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. His new book is Awe: The New Science of Everyday Wonder and How It Can Transform Your Life. More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Why Do We Feel Awe? https://tinyurl.com/3xms3dm2 How Awe Brings People Together: https://tinyurl.com/2p8m2tyk Eight Reasons Why Awe Makes Your Life Better: https://tinyurl.com/2p8ccav2 Six Ways to Incorporate Awe Into Your Daily Life: https://tinyurl.com/3emucdez How Music Bonds Us Together: https://tinyurl.com/329scmf6 Can a Sense of Awe Improve Our Arguments? https://tinyurl.com/pb2eh8c6 We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience contemplating your communities. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Apple Podcasts: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap Help us share Happiness Break! Leave us a 5-star review and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
How Awe Brings Us Together
05-01-2023
How Awe Brings Us Together
Feeling awe changes your brain. In our first episode in a series about the science awe, we explore how awe can make you a better friend, partner, and community member. Episode summary: When Mirna Valerio tried out hiking for the first time as a young kid, she discovered something she didn’t expect: Being outdoors seemed to bring strangers closer to one another. It was like it somehow fastracked forming meaningful relationships. Today we know that the feeling of awe nature often inspires has something to do with this. Awe is the feeling you get when in the presence of something vast and incomprehensible. When we feel it, our sense of self shrinks – in a good way – and we get better at connecting with others. Today on The Science of Happiness, we explore what it’s like when awe helps us create communities, and the science behind how it works. This episode is part of special series we’re doing on Awe. In the weeks ahead, we’ll share Happiness Breaks to help you contemplate what’s awe-inspiring in your life and explore more dimensions of awe in the stories and science we share on this podcast. Our host, Dacher Keltner, has a new book out about awe. It’s called Awe: The New Science of Everyday Wonder and How It Can Transform Your Life. Learn more here: https://tinyurl.com/3uzk8m5r Practice: Awe Narrative Think back to a time when you felt a sense of awe; when you were around something vast and incomprehensible. It could be something physically vast, like a mountain range or beautiful valley, or psychological, like a brilliant idea or inspiring person.Describe the experience in writing in as much detail as possible. Don’t worry about spelling or grammar, just get down as much about the experience as you can. Learn more about this practice at Greater Good In Action: https://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/awe_narrative Today’s guests: Mirna Valerio is an ultra-marathon athlete and author known for her body-positive presence on social media. Follow Mirna on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/themirnavator/?hl=en Follow Mirna on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheMirnavator Follow Mirna on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheMirnavator/ Yang Bai is a professor at Peking University in China. Learn more about Bai and her work: https://en.gsm.pku.edu.cn/faculty/ybai/ Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Six Ways to Incorporate Awe Into Your Daily Life: https://tinyurl.com/3emucdez How the Science of Awe Shaped Pixar’s “Soul:” https://tinyurl.com/37z43vrz How a Sense of Awe Can Inspire Us to Confront Threats to Humanity: https://tinyurl.com/3k6xprau More Resources About Awe The Atlantic  - The Quiet Profundity of Everyday Awe: https://tinyurl.com/yz623mff NYT - How a Bit of Awe Can Improve Your Health: https://tinyurl.com/4zdzcusk Sierra Club - The Science of Awe: https://tinyurl.com/3pfn23t7 Tell us about your experiences of awe. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts or share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap
Happiness Break: An Affirmation Practice for the New Year
29-12-2022
Happiness Break: An Affirmation Practice for the New Year
This New Year, affirm the wonderful qualities you already possess with this meditative writing practice called "I Am." How to Do This Practice: Take a moment to sit still and take a few deep breaths, and notice how you’re feeling right now.Open your eyes, and on a sheet of paper, write “I am ____,” and then fill in that blank.Set a timer for 1 minute, and repeat step 2 until the time is up.Take a moment to observe what you’ve written. Where did you begin? Where did you end? What can you glean about how you’re showing up today, from what you’ve written? Look for patterns.Take a few more mindful breaths. Consider how what you’ve just written might influence what you’ve just written and the rest of your day. Today’s Happiness Break host: Chris Murchison is an artist and meditation teacher. Check out Chris’s website: https://chrismurchison.com/ Follow Chris on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chrismarcellmurchison/ Follow Chris on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/chris.m.murchison More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Be a Remarkable Boss During Lockdown (by Chris Murchison): https://tinyurl.com/yypps3aw Can Self-Awareness Help You Be More Empathic? https://tinyurl.com/eefds36s Do You Have a True Self? https://tinyurl.com/3xasurwp Ten Habits of Highly Creative People https://tinyurl.com/yt83udz6 Make Self-Compassion One of Your New Year’s Resolutions https://tinyurl.com/ymn6m5pp The Dark Side of Self-Help: https://tinyurl.com/4jajdfum We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experiences with self-insight or self-affirmations. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Apple Podcasts: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap Help us share Happiness Break! Leave us a 5-star review and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
How to Make Life More Meaningful
22-12-2022
How to Make Life More Meaningful
Chris Sharma is one of the greatest rock climbers of all time, and he's taking on some of the biggest challenges in life: becoming a parent and starting his own business. Chris tries a practice shown to help us craft our own path and purpose in life. Episode summary: Chris Sharma spent his youth traveling the globe and becoming one of the greatest rock climbers of all time. His passion for climbing has filled his life with purpose, but now in middle age, he wants to also focus on other sources of meaning in life that are just as important to him. Chris joins us after trying a practice in life crafting — where you get clear on your values, imagine what your ideal life would look like, and make a plan to get closer to that vision. Later in the show, we hear from Michael Steger, a psychologist and director of the Center for Meaning and Purpose at Colorado State University, about the surprising places in our lives we can find meaning, and the different roads we can take towards living a more meaningful life. Try the Life Crafting Practice: Identify your deepest values and passions — what’s most important to you.Reflect on your ideal future: Write a paragraph envisioning how you’d like your social life or your career path to turn out if you had no constraints.Write down how you’ll attain those goals. Prioritize them, and write “if, then” plans for how you’ll overcome obstacles you’re likely to encounter.Make a public commitment. Tell your community about your goals. Learn more about this practice at Greater Good In Action: https://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/life_crafting Today’s guests: Chris Sharma is an elite rock climber known for traveling the world to find the most beautiful and challenging places to rock climb. His new show The Climb premieres on HBO on January 12. Check out the trailer here: https://tinyurl.com/suz35w8y Follow Chris on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chris_sharma/ Check out his website: http://www.chrissharma.com/ Michael Steger is a professor of psychology at Colorado State University, where he is the director of the Center for Meaning and Purpose. Learn more about Steger’s work: http://www.michaelfsteger.com/ Follow Steger on Twitter: https://tinyurl.com/yc79d6mb Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Michael Steger: Why We Search for Meaning: https://tinyurl.com/2s469242 Here’s How to Find Meaning in Your Midlife Crisis: https://tinyurl.com/4kpcnr9c What Our Photos Say About Us (Podcast): https://tinyurl.com/y56wvj42 Purpose in Life Quiz: https://tinyurl.com/yz4ztenp Living with a Purpose Changes Everything: https://tinyurl.com/d3ea7afa More On Meaning and Purpose: The Atlantic - The Meaning of Life Is Surprisingly Simple: https://tinyurl.com/2yfucadj Pew - Where Americans Find Meaning in Life: https://tinyurl.com/nek5j6tk Scientific American - To Feel Meaningful Is To Feel Immortal: https://tinyurl.com/yuhe99m9 NPR - What's Your Purpose? https://tinyurl.com/465aknec Harvard Business Review: What Is the Purpose of Your Purpose? https://tinyurl.com/43pjrc6j Tell us about how you find meaning in your life. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts or share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap
Happiness Break: Finding Presence Through Your Senses
15-12-2022
Happiness Break: Finding Presence Through Your Senses
Sight, smell, touch, sound, and taste: all of our five senses provide unique pathways to presence and happiness. We spend a few minutes being mindful of each one. How to Do This Practice: Find a comfortable place where you feel safe. Close your eyes or soften your gaze. Take a few deep breths, noticing the sensation of the air as it moves through your nose, into your lungs, and back out again. Sound: For a few breaths, pay attention to the sounds around you. Notice where they are in space.Touch: Put one hand on top of the other. Notice the sensations you feel in your hand as your fingers’ knuckles touch the other, like temperature and texture.. Shift your attention to your cheeks, noticing temperature and the feel of the air.Taste: Now, pay attention to the taste you are experiencing on your tongue. There may be no taste or the taste of saliva.Smell: Move your focus to the smell around you as you take a breath. See how many odors you can identify.**Sight: Finally, focus your gaze on a point eight inches in front of you for a few seconds and see what colors, forms, light, and shadow you notice there.Take a few more deep breaths here and notice if any of your senses feel heightened. More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Listen to our Happiness Break on body scan meditation: https://tinyurl.com/bd6x8ba5How to Focus Under Pressure (podcast) https://tinyurl.com/mxpd6mtdComing to Our Senses: https://tinyurl.com/3d4jkprrHands-On Research: The Science of Touch: https://tinyurl.com/y79vpbre10 Steps to Savoring the Good Things in Life: https://tinyurl.com/2zwb5y8v We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience with the five senses meditation. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Apple Podcast: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap Help us share Happiness Break! Leave us a 5-star review and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
The Science of Synchronized Movement
08-12-2022
The Science of Synchronized Movement
Moving in sync with someone else — even a total stranger — can change how you feel about them, and how you act, without you realizing it. Episode summary: When was the last time you moved in sync with someone else? Dancing, exercising, even just walking in step — for some, it comes easily, for others, it’s a challenge. But can moving to the same beat make all of us kinder to one another? This week, our guest Chris Duffy steps out of his comfort zone to try a practice in Body Music, rhythmically making sounds just by tapping your body, with body percussionist Keith Terry. Later, we learn how tapping in sync with someone else tricks you into thinking you have more in common with them, and can make you more inclined to help them. Practice: To start, stand up. Clap your hands together in front of your chest, then tap your left palm to your right chest, then right hand to your left chest. Repeat at a steady cadence.Next, cap your hands together in front of your chest, then tap your left hand to your right chest, then right hand to your left chest, the right hand to top of your right thigh, then left hand to left thigh. Repeat at a steady cadence.You can add on by tapping your right hand to your right buttocks and left hand to left buttocks after you finish tapping both thighs in step 2. Repeat (including all of step 2) at a steady cadence.To add even more complexity, stomp each foot one at a time after completing all of step 3. Repeat at a steady cadence. Check out a video of body percussionist Keith Terry performing this practice (and try it with a friend!): https://tinyurl.com/mwffv447 Today’s guests: Chris Duffy is a comedian, writer, and host of the TED podcast How to Be A Better Human. Listen to Chris’s podcast, How to Be a Better Human: https://tinyurl.com/bdey9pm5 Follow Chris on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chrisiduffy/ Follow Chris on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/christopheriduffy Check out Chris’s comedy: https://chrisduffycomedy.com/videos Keith Terry is a body percussionist and creator of the Body Music practice Chris tried today. Learn more about Keith’s work: https://crosspulse.com/keith-terry/ Check out one of Keith’s original compositions: https://tinyurl.com/ybhweyux Piercarlo Valdesolo  is a psychologist and Chair of Psychological Science at Claremont McKenna College in California. Learn more about Piercarolo’s work: http://www.valdesolo.com/ Check out the Moral Emotions and Trust Lab: http://www.valdesolo.com/meat-lab Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How Music Bonds Us Together https://tinyurl.com/329scmf6 To Resolve Conflicts, Get Up and Move https://tinyurl.com/bdf6zswn Five Ways Music Can Make You a Better Person https://tinyurl.com/mwa22r8m How to Train the Compassionate Brain https://tinyurl.com/32nbuh94 More Resources on Synchronized Movement PRX - Body Music with Keith Terry https://tinyurl.com/2p8tz5j3 Scientific American - Moving in Sync Creates Surprising Social Bonds among People https://tinyurl.com/3y3ahfa3 Oxford University - Let’s dance: synchronised movement helps us tolerate pain and foster friendship  https://tinyurl.com/c8tvrmdx Science Daily - Social Synchronicity https://tinyurl.com/4mzvahe Tell us about your experiences and struggles with body music or moving in sync. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts or share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap
Happiness Break: Tune Into Your Body
01-12-2022
Happiness Break: Tune Into Your Body
Happiness isn't only in your head — your body is important, too. This week, we're led in a short Japanese calisthenics practice called Radio Taiso. Check out Radha’s video guide to this practice: https://dose.daybreaker.com/videos/microdose-oxytocin-healthy-spine Today’s Happiness Break guide: Radha Agrawal is Japanese-Indian author and a founder of Daybreaker, a company that throws sober dance parties at sunrise all around the world. Learn more about Daybreaker: https://www.daybreaker.com/ The Science of Happiness listeners get 100% off their first month of Daybreaker’s Dose, using code GGSC at check out:  http://dose.daybreaker.com?code=ggsc Follow Radha on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/love.radha/ Follow Radha on Twitter: https://twitter.com/radhatwin Learn more about Radha and her book, Belong: https://belongbook.com/ More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Moving Your Body Is Like a Tune-Up for Your Mind: https://tinyurl.com/2f64na8bFive Surprising Ways Exercise Changes Your Brain: https://tinyurl.com/4pbx3ruaHow Tuning In to Your Body Can Make You More Resilient: https://tinyurl.com/328scfjjFour Ways Dancing Makes You Happier: https://tinyurl.com/yxp6mxdw We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience of trying radio calisthenics. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Apple Podcasts: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap Help us share Happiness Break! Leave us a 5-star review and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
How to Practice Gratitude When You're Not Feeling Thankful
24-11-2022
How to Practice Gratitude When You're Not Feeling Thankful
One way to feel more thankful for things is to imagine life without them. Our guest tries a practice for seeing the bright side, even when you feel down. Episode summary: We know that gratitude is good for us. But what can we do when we’re struggling to actually feel thankful? Our guest this week is author and podcast producer Stephanie Foo. Foo built a network of close friends around her in California, where she grew up. As a survivor of child abuse and Complex PTSD, her friends in California became her chosen family. And since she’s moved to New York City, she finds herself often pining for the Golden State and the people she loves there. This week, Foo tries a practice in mental subtraction, which gratitude researcher Ernst Bohlmeijer describes as an antidote to taking things for granted. Imagining her life if she didn’t live in New York helps Foo tap into gratitude even in the depths of winter – when she misses California the most. She even discovers her particular skill in getting the benefits of this practice by leaning into one of her PTSD symptoms. Later in the show, Ernst Bohlmeijer breaks down how keeping a gratitude practice can alter the emotions you’re likely to experience in a given day, and maybe even change you as a person. Practice: Take a moment to think about a positive event in your life. It could be a career or educational achievement or a special trip you took.Imagine yourself back in the time of this event. Think about the circumstances that made it possible. Ponder on the ways in which this event may never have happened and write them down. For example, if you hadn’t learned about a certain job opening at the right moment.Imagine what your life would be like now if you had not experienced this positive event and all the fruits that came from it.Remind yourself that this positive event did happen and reflect upon the benefits it has brought you. Allow yourself to feel grateful that things happened as they did. Find the full Mental Subtraction of Positive Events practice at our Greater Good in Action website: https://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/mental_subtraction_positive_events Today’s guests: Stephanie Foo is a radio producer and author of the book What My Bones Know: A Memoir of Healing from Complex Trauma. Learn more about Stephanie and her book: https://www.stephaniefoo.me/ Follow Stephanie on Twitter: https://twitter.com/imontheradio Follow Stephanie on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/foofoofoo/ Follow Stephanie on Facebook: https://tinyurl.com/yx6pwdnf Ernst Bohlmeijer is a psychology professor who studies gratitude at the University of Twente in The Netherlands. Learn more about Ernst and his work: https://tinyurl.com/2p92p6vn Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Four Great Gratitude Strategies: https://tinyurl.com/2p9buvkdTips for Keeping a Gratitude Journal: https://tinyurl.com/3jdbe52uHow to Increase the Love in Your Life: https://tinyurl.com/3k4ayj4nWhy Cynicism Can Hold You Back: https://tinyurl.com/bd4ussjt More Resources for Mental Subtraction of Positive Events: New York Times - Five Ways to Exercise Your Thankfulness Muscles: https://tinyurl.com/t29ukuccNPR - A.J. Jacobs: How Can We Thank Those We Take for Granted?: https://tinyurl.com/56x48u99TED - Your 5-day gratitude challenge: 5 exercises to increase your gratefulness: https://tinyurl.com/mt8j3x65 Tell us your thoughts about this episode. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts or share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap
Happiness Break: 5 Minutes of Gratitude
17-11-2022
Happiness Break: 5 Minutes of Gratitude
Not sure how to start practicing gratitude? Psychologist Dacher Keltner guides you through a practice that can help you see the good things in your life that you might otherwise overlook. How to Do This Practice: Sit or lay down somewhere comfortable. You may close your eyes if you wish, and take a slow, deep breath in to ground into the present moment. Then, scan your body from head to toe, noticing how you’re feeling in this moment. Let worries and plans clear from your mind.Start by thinking about all the things that make your life comfortable: Clean water on tap, light at the flip of a switch, a roof over your head to protect you from the weather, warmth, and comfort when it gets windy, rainy, or cold.Let your mind wander to all the millions of people who have worked hard to make your life more comfortable: Those who plant and harvest the food you eat, who bring it to markets, people who ensure the water we drink is clean, delivery drivers, teachers, all the people who create art and music and books and films and all the things that can bring us so much meaning, and so on.Think about the acquaintances who bring richness to your life, like a colleague, neighbor, or someone you often see at the gym or a coffee shop.Take a moment to think about what you’re really grateful for today, right now.Notice how you’re feeling now, compared to when you started, and then start to bring movement back to your body, wiggling fingers and toes, maybe slowly standing up.If you have the time, spend a few minutes journaling about what you thought about. Today’s Happiness Break host: Dacher Keltner is the host of The Science of Happiness podcast and is a co-instructor of the Greater Good Science Center’s popular online course of the same name. He's also a professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. This practice was created by Dr. Kathy Kemper, who's the director of the Center for Integrative Health and Wellness at the Ohio State University. Learn more about some of her work here: https://mind-bodyhealth.osu.edu/ More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Try GGSC’s online Gratitude Journal, Thnx4: https://tinyurl.com/2s4e4bx6 Take our Gratitude Quiz: https://tinyurl.com/yhbz6cwv Four Great Gratitude Strategies: https://tinyurl.com/2muyff64 Is Gratitude Good for You?: https://tinyurl.com/ycknm2ru Three Surprising Ways Gratitude Works at Work: https://tinyurl.com/yc2c8y4n How Gratitude Motivates Us to Become Better People: https://tinyurl.com/5n6ejpdy We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience with practicing gratitude. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Apple Podcasts: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap Help us share Happiness Break! Leave us a 5-star review and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
The Emerging Science of ASMR (Encore)
10-11-2022
The Emerging Science of ASMR (Encore)
There are millions of YouTube videos with people crinkling bubble wrap or whispering about folding laundry. Our guest talks about why autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) makes her, and many others, feel more calm and happy. Episode summary: Melinda still remembers the tingling feeling she felt when she first listened to the close-up sound of someone drawing on a TV show at the age of ten. She learned later that the subtle sounds that create soothing sensations for her are called autonomous sensory meridian response, or ASMR. Now, she creates ASMR experiences on her YouTube channel and through her live production company, Whisperlodge — from delicately handling a plastic package to gently stroking a microphone with a makeup brush. In today's show, Melinda demystifies the world of ASMR and how it brings both calm and delight to her and her participants. Later, we hear about the emerging science behind ASMR from Dr. Giulia Poerio, who studies it in her lab at the University of Essex. As it turns out, those tingles might actually benefit our mental health. Today’s Science of Happiness Guests: Melinda Lauw, is the co-creator of Whisperlodge, an immersive ASMR theater experience. Check out some ASMR videos from Whisperlodge's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/Whisperlodge Learn more about Whisperlodge: https://whisperlodge.nyc/ Follow Melinda on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/melinda.lauw/ Follow Melinda on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/melindalauw Giulia Poerio is a psychology professor at the University of Essex who studies the effects of ASMR on the mind and body. Learn more about her work: https://www.essex.ac.uk/people/poeri14804/giulia-poerio Resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Listen to our Happiness Break on silence: https://tinyurl.com/2hny7pcdJust One Thing: Pay Attention!: https://tinyurl.com/cm2xb86jWhat Music Looks Like in the Brain: https://tinyurl.com/2k9t3sjzDoes Your Voice Reveal More Emotion Than Your Face?: https://tinyurl.com/ympr4brk More Resources for ASMR: TED - The brain science (and benefits) of ASMR: https://tinyurl.com/y8a89xv3Vox - ASMR, explained: why millions of people are watching YouTube videos of someone whispering: https://tinyurl.com/4j4kn7dhNew York Times - How A.S.M.R. Became a Sensation: https://tinyurl.com/2jke45k5NPR - Some People Get 'Brain Tingles' From These Slime Videos. What's Behind The Feeling?: https://tinyurl.com/2p8p4u7dNational Geographic - ASMR or not? Unpicking the science behind a sensory phenomenon: https://tinyurl.com/yvnvuzk5 Tell us your thoughts about ASMR. Do you get tingly sensations?  Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts or share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap
Happiness Break: Making Space for You
03-11-2022
Happiness Break: Making Space for You
Consider what you want to make space for in your life in this 6-minute contemplation guided by Alex Elle. How to Do This Practice: Take a few deep breaths. File up your belly on each inhale. Drop your shoulder and soften your body on each exhale.Say these eight phrases to yourself, or your own variation of it. Consider which resonates with you the most: a. “In the presence of fear, I will make space for courage.” b. “In the presence of self-doubt, I will make space for self-belief.” c. “In the presence of hurriedness, I will make space for slowing down.” d. “In the presence of overwhelm, I will make space for rest.” e. “In the presence of overthinking, I will make space for letting go.” f. “In the presence of chaos, I will make space for inner peace.” g. “In the presence of confusion, I will make space for clarity.” h. “In the presence of pain, I will make space for self-compassion.” Bring your attention to the line from this meditation that resonates with you the most. Think about all the ways you wish to make space so you can bloom into the best version of yourself.Write it down, perhaps on a sticky note, and keep it somewhere you can see it. Today’s Happiness Break host: Alex Elle is a breathwork coach, author and restorative writing teacher. Her new book, How We Heal, will be published this November. Keep an eye on our Instagram page, @greatergoodmag for a chance to win a copy. Learn more about Alex and her new book: https://www.alexelle.com/about Follow Alex on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/alex/ Follow Alex on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@easewithalexl Follow Alex on Twitter: https://twitter.com/alex__elle Follow Alex on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlexElleFB More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Listen to another Happiness Break podcast hosted by Alex: A Note to Self on ForgivenessBeing Kinder to Yourself: https://tinyurl.com/yxu64dukCan Self-Awareness Help You Be More Empathic?: https://tinyurl.com/bjue72bnHow to Bring Self-Compassion to Work with You: https://tinyurl.com/2xn4f3pkCan Self-Compassion Overcome Procrastination?: https://tinyurl.com/ytvxmp5dDoes Self-Compassion Make You Selfish?: https://tinyurl.com/528h6h6x We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience of making space for yourself. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Apple Podcast: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap Help us share Happiness Break! Leave us a 5-star review and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day
How Humor Helps us Cope
27-10-2022
How Humor Helps us Cope
Hardships in life are a given, but what if we found a way to laugh about it? Our guest shares how he's used humor to cope with the deepest pains in his life. Episode summary: When we go through hardships and struggles, finding the humor in them can help us relieve stress and change our perspective. This week on The Science of Happiness, our guest shares how he’s used humor to triumph over hardship in his life. Kerry Rudd is a former member of the Bay Area Freedom Collective, a re-entry home where formerly incarcerated people can find community and connections. He started performing comedy based on his personal experiences during the 12 years he spent in and out of the prison. Kerry shares with us how processing his experiences by writing jokes about them changes his perspective on his traumatic past and helps him cope. Later, we hear from psychologist Andrea Samson about how humor can help us  face down  some difficult situations. How to Do This Practice: Every day for one week, spend 10 minutes thinking about the things you found really funny that day.Write them down in as much detail as possible and describe how each of those things made you feel. It’s important to write it out, as opposed to only doing it in your head.Write down the reason why these things were funny. You can also answer the question, “Why did this funny event happen?” Find the full Three Fun Things practice at our Greater Good in Action website: https://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/three_funny_things Today’s Science of Happiness Guests: Kerry Rudd is a former member of the Bay Area Freedom Collective, a home by and for formerly incarcerated people, which provides resources and support for their re-entry. To learn more about Bay Area Freedom House: https://www.collectivefreedom.org/ or: https://www.facebook.com/bayareafreedom/ To financially support the Bay Area Freedom Collective: https://givedirect.org/freedomcollective/ Andrea Samson is director of the chEERSLab at UniDistance Suisse and the University of Fribourg. She studies how humor helps us deal with one difficult situation and emotions Learn more about Andrea’s research: https://tinyurl.com/3t42rp93 More resources on humor from The Greater Good Science Center: Listen to The Science of Happiness episode on how humor can strengthen a relationship: https://tinyurl.com/4jem5r25How a Little Humor Can Improve Your Work Life: https://tinyurl.com/4u2949mkHow Laughter Brings Us Together: https://tinyurl.com/2s3zfp7hWhy Do We Laugh?: https://tinyurl.com/4rr4d7ch More resources on humor: New York Times - Is It OK to Laugh During Dark Times?: https://tinyurl.com/4c22uekjGuardian - You’ve got to laugh: why a sense of humor helps in dark times: https://tinyurl.com/3xpvkcm2ABC - Why Pain Makes Us Laugh: https://tinyurl.com/4fa6snj5The Atlantic - The Link Between Happiness and a Sense of Humor: https://tinyurl.com/3mke3wpcMayo Clinic - Stress relief from laughter? It's no joke: https://tinyurl.com/4w8f4rwxScientific American - Laugh so you don't cry: how laughing kills the pain: https://tinyurl.com/3sysuwyf Tell us what you think about using humor as a coping strategy by emailing us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or using the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts or copy and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap
Happiness Break: Restore Through Silence
20-10-2022
Happiness Break: Restore Through Silence
When was the last time you spent a moment savoring silence? Tricia Hersey, aka The Nap Bishop, guides us through an appreciation of silence and its restorative powers. Scientists have found that spending just two minutes in silence can lower your blood pressure and heart rate, even when compared to listening to slow, relaxing music. How to Do This Practice: Find a quiet place to rest. Set a two-minute timer and put it aside.Close your eyes and soften your face. Allow yourself to listen to the silence and rest your body.At the end of the two minutes, slowly open your eyes and notice how you feel in your body. Or, continue resting in silence for as long as you need. Today’s Happiness Break host: Tricia Hersey is an activist, organizer, and founder of The Nap Ministry. She is also the author of a new book, Rest is Resistance: A Manifesto. Order it here: https://tinyurl.com/5bkk6txk Learn more about Tricia and her work: https://thenapministry.com/ Follow Tricia on Instagram: [https://www.instagram.com/thenapministry/\](http:// https://www.instagram.com/thenapministry/) Follow Tricia on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Thenapministry/ Follow Tricia on Twitter: https://twitter.com/thenapministry More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Avoid Burnout—or a Breakdown: https://tinyurl.com/5h4nrahyWhat Is Black Fatigue, and How Can We Protect Employees from It?: https://tinyurl.com/yzcujre7Quiet Justice: https://tinyurl.com/yc78fknk More resources on the science of silence: TIME - How Listening to Silence Changes Our Brains: https://tinyurl.com/4brpst8bHealthline - 8 Physical and Mental Health Benefits of Silence, Plus How to Get More of It: https://tinyurl.com/5d84mxenNew Scientist - The power of quiet: The mental and physical health benefits of silence: https://tinyurl.com/2wn82wkrPsychCentral - The Hidden Benefits of Silence: https://tinyurl.com/2p9fkc36 We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience of holding silence. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Apple Podcasts: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap Help us share Happiness Break! Leave us a 5-star review and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
How to Focus Under Pressure
13-10-2022
How to Focus Under Pressure
Jeopardy! champion Amy Schneider tries a body scan meditation to sharpen her focus and calm her nerves as she prepares for the Tournament of Champions. Episode summary: Amy Schneider is the most successful woman to ever compete on Jeopardy!. Part of her winning strategy was to shut down all her mental chatter and completely focus on the competition. But when the cameras are off, she struggles to find the same calm. For today’s show, Amy tries a body scan practice to connect with her body and quiet her busy mind. Later we hear from Jonathan Greenberg, a Harvard psychology professor. He explains how mindfulness can make us better problem solvers, and how that can benefit our emotional health, too. How to Do This Practice: Find a quiet place where you feel safe and comfortable. You can be standing, sitting, or lying down.Close your eyes, and take a few deep, long breaths.Move your attention through your body slowly, part by part, starting with your feet. Focus on your feet, then your calves, knees, and so on, until you get to the top of your head. Without judgment, notice what sensations you can identify in each part of the body.When your mind wanders, gently and with self-kindness, guide your attention back to the part of the body you’re focusing on in the present moment. Find the full Body Scan Meditation practice at our Greater Good in Action website: https://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/body_scan_meditation Today’s guests: Amy Schneider is the most successful woman to compete on the quiz show Jeopardy! and won 40 consecutive games. Follow Amy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Jeopardamy Follow Amy on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jeopardamy/ Follow Amy on Facebook: https://tinyurl.com/5b4dyezy Jonathan Greenberg is a psychology professor in Harvard University’s Clinical and Translational Science Center. His research focuses on the role of mindfulness and relaxation. Learn more about Jonathan’s research: https://tinyurl.com/yn7j73au More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Try a body scan meditation guided by host Dacher Keltner, on Happiness Break: https://tinyurl.com/bd6x8ba5Where to Find Wisdom in the Body: https://tinyurl.com/yctxtkztCompassionate Mind, Healthy Body: https://tinyurl.com/5n79ary9Moving Your Body Is Like a Tune-Up for Your Mind: https://tinyurl.com/2f64na8bYour Anxiety Might Be Coming From Your Body: https://tinyurl.com/4j9ynwr9 More resources on body scan meditation: NPR - A Crash Course in Body Scan Meditation: https://tinyurl.com/mu24fx7pHarvard Health - You can practice mindfulness in as little as 15 minutes a day: https://tinyurl.com/4aex773810% Happier - Change Your Posture, Change Your Mood: https://tinyurl.com/4crydjs6Time - This Quick Meditation Helps You Let Go of Stress and Sleep: https://tinyurl.com/4mzpu2zr Tell us about how you feel after trying the body-scan meditation. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or use the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts or copy and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap
Happiness Break: How to Awaken Joy
06-10-2022
Happiness Break: How to Awaken Joy
Cultivate more joy in your life with this practice led by meditation teacher and author Spring Washam. How to Do This Practice: Think about an area of your life that brings you joy, it could be anything. Imagine yourself experiencing that moment of happiness. Feel the smiles, the peace and laughter.As you reflect on the moment, say to yourself, “may my joy and my happiness increase.” Next, practice “sympathetic joy.” To do this, think about someone you know having a great experience.As you think of them in their joy, say to them in your mind, “May your joy and happiness increase.” Or you can also say, “I'm happy for your happiness. May your happiness continue.”Remember that happiness is infinite. Being joyful for others is a way to increase your joy.  Today’s Happiness Break host: Spring Washam, is a meditation teacher based in Oakland, California. She is also the author of the forthcoming book, The Spirit of Harriet Tubman: Awakening from the Underground. Learn more about Spring and her new book: https://www.springwasham.com/ Follow Spring on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/springwasham/ Follow Spring on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/teacher.springwasham/ Follow Spring on Twitter: https://twitter.com/springwasham Check out Spring’s YouTube channel: https://tinyurl.com/22njyd29 More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: How to Overcome Stress by Seeing Other People’s Joy: https://tinyurl.com/3cn22wcbHow Your Life Is Shaped by the Emotions You Want to Feel: https://tinyurl.com/54ff3b4kMoments of Love and Connection May Help You Live Longer: https://tinyurl.com/328scfjjCan You Be Too Happy?: https://tinyurl.com/4jswnf94Why Other People’s Good News Could Be Good for You: https://tinyurl.com/4d8dxsw5 We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience of cultivating joy. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or using the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Apple Podcast: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap Help us share Happiness Break! Leave us a 5-star review and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
Why Listen to the Other Side?
29-09-2022
Why Listen to the Other Side?
These days, it's hard to imagine befriending people with different politics than your own. But these two men did it using a tried and true practice. Episode summary: When a graphic work of art depicting two men having sex was hung up in a busy hallway on a community college campus, it stirred up a huge controversy. Some students wanted it taken down, while others opposed the idea of censoring art. Instead of retreating to their respective echo chambers, two students who disagreed had a public debate. It was so successful, they actually went on to create a discourse club on campus. We learn the tactics that helped them navigate a divisive topic with their civility and differing values intact. Later, we hear from psychologist Cynthia Wang on how taking someone else’s perspective can bring people of different backgrounds together and disrupt stereotyping. Practice: Think of someone whom you might be at odds with — perhaps they have different political beliefs, or they’re not part of your ethnic or religious group, or they have arguments with you.Take a moment to imagine yourself as this person, seeing the world through their eyes. Recall a moment you shared with this person and think how you, as this person, experience that shared situation. What does the world look like from their point of view?Try to imagine how it feels to be them as vividly as possible. Ask yourself questions such as, what emotions are they experiencing? How might that feel in their body? How might their feelings in the situation differ from yours?If you’re in a debate with this person, try taking their side and formulate an argument on their behalf. You might understand more nuances about their views.If you have the time, you can even try to imagine a day in your life as this person. Find the bridging differences playbook in our Greater Good in Action website: https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/what_we_do/major_initiatives/bridging_differences Today’s guests: Mark Urista is a professor of communication at Linn-Benton Community College in Oregon. Anthony Lusardi and Steven Olson are former students at Linn-Benton Community College. Learn more about LBCC Civil Discourse Club: https://tinyurl.com/5becxpba Follow the LBCC Civil Discourse Club on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LBCCCivilDiscourse/ Dr. Cynthia Wang is the clinical psychology professor at Northwestern University. She’s also the executive director of the Dispute Resolution Research Center at the Kellogg School of Management. Learn more about Cynthia and her work: https://tinyurl.com/56kebcvw Follow Cynthia on Twitter: https://twitter.com/cynthiascwang Resources for bridging differences from The Greater Good Science Center: Learn more about the Bridging Differences Initiative: https://tinyurl.com/5n6j5e3t Eight Keys to Bridging Our Differences: https://tinyurl.com/ywaay6ux What Will It Take to Bridge Our Differences? https://tinyurl.com/yjvvt622 How to Get Some Emotional Distance in an Argument: https://tinyurl.com/342r4sjz More resources on bridging differences: TED - Bridging Cultural Differences(playlist): https://tinyurl.com/racj5edf NPR - Why We Fight: The Psychology Of Political Differences: https://tinyurl.com/52rxnxwj Tell us about your experiences of bridging differences by emailing us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or using the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts or copy and share this link with someone who might like the show: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap This episode is supported by Arthur Vining Davis Foundations, as part of the Greater Good Science Center’s Bridging Differences initiative. To learn more about the Bridging Differences initiative, please visit: https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/what_we_do/major_initiatives/bridging_differences
Happiness Break: Six Minutes to Connect with Your Body
22-09-2022
Happiness Break: Six Minutes to Connect with Your Body
Dedicating a little time to tune into your body fortifies you to better handle the stresses of daily life. How to Do This Practice: Find a quiet place where you feel safe and comfortable.You can be standing, sitting, or lying down. Make sure that you feel relaxed.Close your eyes, and take a few deep, long breaths.Move your attention through your body slowly, part by part. Focus on your feet, then your calves, knees, and so on, until you get to the top of your head. Without judgment, notice what sensations you can identify in each part of the body.When your mind wanders, gently and with self-kindness, guide your attention back to the part of the body you’re focusing on in the present moment. Find the full Body Scan Meditation practice at our Greater Good in Action website: https://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/body_scan_meditation More resources from The Greater Good Science Center: Listen to a Science of Happiness episode on the body scan meditation with Daniel Wu: https://tinyurl.com/hn6vhx4bHow a Body Scan Can Help With Strong Emotions: https://tinyurl.com/57sdek76How Tuning In to Your Body Can Make You More Resilient: https://tinyurl.com/328scfjjWhat Self-Compassion Feels Like in Your Body: https://tinyurl.com/426hfnjjCompassionate Mind, Healthy Body: https://tinyurl.com/5n79ary9Your Anxiety Might Be Coming From Your Body: https://tinyurl.com/4j9ynwr9Why Yoga Is Good for Your Body and Brain, According to Science: https://tinyurl.com/ynja9f22 We love hearing from you! Tell us about your experience with the body scan meditation. Email us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or using the hashtag #happinesspod. Find us on Apple Podcast: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap Help us share Happiness Break! Leave us a 5-star review and copy and share this link: https://tinyurl.com/2p9h5aap We're living through a mental health crisis. Between the stress, anxiety, depression, loneliness, burnout — we all could use a break to feel better. That's where Happiness Break comes in. In each biweekly podcast episode, instructors guide you through research-backed practices and meditations that you can do in real-time. These relaxing and uplifting practices have been shown in a lab to help you cultivate calm, compassion, connection, mindfulness, and more — what the latest science says will directly support your well-being. All in less than ten minutes. A little break in your day.
Nine Steps to Forgiveness
15-09-2022
Nine Steps to Forgiveness
How do you forgive someone while still holding them accountable? What if that person is yourself? This week, our guest tries a practice in forgiving herself and someone else. Episode summary: Anoosha Syed appreciates her name now, but as a kid, she struggled with feeling different from everyone else. She had friends call her “Annie” and even dyed her hair blonde in an effort to look less Pakistani. Anoosha joins us after trying a practice in forgiveness. Anoosha explores the complexities of forgiving someone who’s in a position of power and privilege and should know better, like the teacher who always mispronounced her name. Then, Anoosha took the practice a step further and directed it inward. She shares what it was like to forgive her younger self for not being as proud of her culture as she is today.  Later, we hear from psychologist Dr. Lydia Woodyatt about the power of self-compassion and affirming our important values to release us from destructive self-blame while still holding ourselves accountable when we need to. Practice: Make sure you know how you feel about what is going on and be able to articulate it. Then, tell someone you can trust about your experience.Tell yourself you will feel better because of this forgiveness. Forgiveness is for you, not for others.Remember, forgiveness does not necessarily mean reconciling with the person who upsets you or condoning the behavior.Recognize that your primary pain comes from hurt feelings, thoughts, and physical discomfort you are experiencing now, not from the thing that offended or hurt in the past.Practice stress management to soothe yourself when you're feeling overwhelmed. Try things like mindful breathing or going for a walk.Remind yourself that you cannot expect others to act in the way you think they should, but it’s ok to hope that they do.Find another way to achieve the positive outcome you had hoped for in the first place.Instead of focusing on your hurt feelings, look for the bright side of things. Focus on what’s going well for you.Change the way you look at your past so you remind yourself of your heroic choice to forgive.. Find the Nine Steps to Forgiveness Practice at our Greater Good in Action website: https://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/nine_steps_to_forgiveness Today’s guests: Anoosha Syed is a Pakistani-Canadian freelance illustrator and author of the children's book, That is Not My Name. Learn more about Anoosha and her works: http://www.anooshasyed.com/ Follow Anoosha on Twitter: https://twitter.com/foxville_art Instagram: https://tinyurl.com/3pahbn7x YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/anooshasyed Dr. Lydia Woodyatt is an associate professor in Psychology at Flinders University in Australia. She studies wellbeing, justice, emotions, and motivation. Learn more about Lydia and her works: https://tinyurl.com/mrs974by Follow Lydia on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LydiaWoodyatt Resources for forgiveness from The Greater Good Science Center: Listen to an episode of Happiness Break on Self-forgiveness: https://tinyurl.com/3d7sevfs Eight Keys to Forgiveness: https://tinyurl.com/5n82yjkf Is a Grudge Keeping You Up at Night?: https://tinyurl.com/yc7pkdyk More resources on forgiveness: TED - How (and why) to forgive: https://tinyurl.com/mu2zep4f Harvard Health - The Power of Forgiveness: https://tinyurl.com/2p9fden3 10% Happier - Writing a Forgiveness letter: https://tinyurl.com/mr5y624x Tell us about your experiences letting go of a grudge by emailing us at happinesspod@berkeley.edu or using the hashtag #happinesspod. Help us share The Science of Happiness! Leave us a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts or copy and share this link with someone who might like the show: pod.link/1340505607