The Job Doctor - Tessa White

Tessa White

People have a love/hate relationship with the workplace, and it’s not getting any easier. If anything, the friction is at an all-time high. The truth is, you spend more time at your job than with your family or friends, so why not learn how to make the workplace work for YOU. We are talking about how to get more money, when to stay or when to leave, how to talk to your manager about tough topics, and breathing new life into your flatlined career. From pay to promotions, from power to politics, we get into the nitty-gritty and help you claim control of your own workplace wellness. The Job Doctor is In… read less
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Episodes

Double Trouble: Two Career Coaches Help You Winning the Corporate Job Search Game  Pt. 2
Yesterday
Double Trouble: Two Career Coaches Help You Winning the Corporate Job Search Game Pt. 2
In part two of this special episode, Tessa talks with That Career Coach, Kendall Berg.  Kendall shares her tips on networking and brand building. Human connection is a core pillar of a happy and meaningful life.  While work plays a vital role, it shouldn't come at the expense of the relationships that support us, inspire us, and give our lives lasting value.Work Accomplishments Fade: Projects are completed, goals are reached, and promotions are earned – yet their effect on our lives can diminish over time.Relationships Endure: Strong relationships with family, friends, and colleagues provide lasting support, joy, and a sense of belonging that often outlasts the immediate impact of any single work achievement.Kendall and Tessa discuss how to be a good manager and how to make the challenging leap from manager to director.  They also discuss mental load and how it differs from workload.WorkloadFocus: Quantifiable tasks and their associated time or effort to complete.Tangible: Visible and easily measured.Examples:Answering 50 emails in an hour.Filing a specific number of reports.Building a piece of furniture.Mental LoadFocus: The thought processes involved in managing tasks, responsibilities, and decision-making.Intangible: Not directly visible or easily measured.Examples:Remembering to buy milk on the way home and deciding which brand to get.Planning a birthday party (guest lists, invites, food, activities).Keeping track of everyone's schedules and appointments in a family.Key DifferencesVisibility: Workload is visible; mental load is invisible.Measurement: Workload is easier to quantify; mental load is more subjective.Scope: Workload often pertains to job-related tasks; mental load encompasses all areas of life, including work, home, and relationships.Why This Distinction MattersUnderstanding the difference between mental load and workload is crucial because:Reduces Overwhelm: Recognizing mental load can help individuals explain their feelings of exhaustion or overwhelm when their workload may not seem excessive.Promotes Equitable Distribution: Understanding mental load can help partners, families, and teams more fairly distribute invisible tasks and responsibilities.Improved Work-Life Balance: Awareness of mental load can lead to a better understanding of overall work capacity and the potential need for strategies to manage both workload and mental load.Find Kendall at https://thatcareercoach.net/She is @ThatCareerCoach on all social media.Her book Secrets of the Corporate Game comes out in November 2024To be a guest on The JOB Doctor Click HereOrder Tessa's Book "The Unspoken Truths for Career Success: Navigating Pay, Promotions, and Power at Work"
Double Trouble: Two Career Coaches Help You Winning the Corporate Job Search Game  Pt. 1
May 13 2024
Double Trouble: Two Career Coaches Help You Winning the Corporate Job Search Game Pt. 1
In part one of this special episode, Tessa talks with fellow career coach, Kendall Berg, of That Career Coach. Kendall has years of experience in the corporate world with a background rooted in technology complementing Tessa’s background in HR. Together they offer valuable perspectives on today’s corporate landscape. In this episode, Kendall interviews Tessa. They discuss the “games” played in the corporate world and what happens behind closed doors. In a cancel culture, learning to have crucial conversations may change the course of your career.1. Office PoliticsFocus: Navigating power dynamics, building alliances, and managing interpersonal relationships to advance one's agenda (positive or negative).Examples:Spreading rumors or subtly undermining colleaguesTaking undue credit for the work of others.Forming exclusive cliques to gain influence.Gossiping and backstabbing.2. The Blame GameFocus: Avoiding responsibility for errors and shifting fault to others.Examples:Refusing to acknowledge mistakes and covering them up.Making excuses or pointing fingers at other team members.Creating a culture of fear, limiting open communication and problem-solving.3. The Appearance GameFocus: Prioritizing image and perception over actual productivity or substance.Examples:Spending excessive time on presentations and formatting instead of focusing on content.Attending unnecessary meetings to appear busy and engaged.Prioritizing self-promotion over meaningful contributions.4. Strategy Games (These can be beneficial or harmful)Focus: Navigating power structures, competition, and negotiation tactics to achieve objectives. This can be healthy and necessary in business.Examples:Carefully crafting persuasive arguments to win support for projects.Anticipating the moves of competitors or internal rivals.Building coalitions and networks for influence.Why Recognizing Corporate Games is ImportantAvoid Toxicity: Identifying the negative games helps individuals avoid getting caught up in destructive patterns that hurt morale and productivity.Strategic Advantage: Understanding the rules of both negative and positive games allows people to navigate the corporate landscape more effectively.Promoting a Healthy Culture: Bringing awareness to these games can foster a culture of accountability, transparency, and collaboration.Important Note: It's crucial to distinguish between harmless social dynamics and genuinely toxic behaviors. Not all interpersonal maneuvering or ambition is harmful.Find Kendall at https://thatcareercoach.net/She is @ThatCareerCoach on all social media. Her book Secrets of the Corporate Game comes out in November 2024To be a guest on The JOB Doctor Click HereOrder Tessa's Book "The Unspoken Truths for Career Success: Navigating Pay, Promotions, and Power at Work"
The Road Map to Your Next Promotion Is In YOUR Hands
Jul 31 2023
The Road Map to Your Next Promotion Is In YOUR Hands
Farrah finds herself as a new manager. Eager to do that job well and manage those under her successfully. She also wants those who are her direct reports to know their pathway up the ladder as well.5 steps to becoming a better manager:Get to know your employees. This means getting to know them on a personal and professional level. What are their goals? What are their strengths and weaknesses? What motivates them? The more you know about your employees, the better you'll be able to support them and help them succeed.Communicate effectively. This means being clear and concise in your communication, both verbally and in writing. It also means being a good listener and being open to feedback.Set clear expectations. Make sure your employees know what is expected of them in terms of their work, their behavior, and their contributions to the team.Provide regular feedback. Feedback is essential for helping employees grow and develop. Be sure to give both positive and constructive feedback, and be specific about what you are seeing and how it can be improved.Be a leader, not just a manager. A leader is someone who inspires and motivates others. They set a positive example and create a culture of trust and respect. If you want to be a better manager, focus on becoming a better leader.Here are some additional tips for becoming a better manager:Be adaptable and willing to change. The world of work is constantly changing, so you need to be able to adapt your management style accordingly.Be patient and understanding. Managing people is not always easy, and there will be times when you need to be patient and understanding.Be self-aware. Take the time to reflect on your own strengths and weaknesses as a manager. This will help you identify areas where you can improve.Be open to feedback. Ask your employees for feedback on your performance as a manager. This can help you identify areas where you can improve.Becoming a better manager takes time and effort, but it is worth it. By following these tips, you can improve your skills and become a more effective leader.To be a guest on The JOB Doctor Click HereOrder Tessa's Book "The Unspoken Truths for Career Success: Navigating Pay, Promotions, and Power at Work"
You Don't Get What You Deserve, You Get What You Negotiate
Jul 10 2023
You Don't Get What You Deserve, You Get What You Negotiate
Eileen is making a career change within the healthcare industry. She is beginning pay negotiations and wants to make sure she is asking the right questions. What questions should I ask during a pay negotiation?Is PTO something that can be negotiated?Tessa recommends choosing your top 3 things to negotiate. She provides multiple areas of negotiation to consider and questions to ask around each:SalaryBonusesBenefitsPTO (possible at smaller companies)Professional Associations/AffiliationsContinued educationTravel stipendsPaid electronics (laptop, cell phone)Home office expensesTitleSeverance GUIDELINES FOR NEGOTIATIONDo your research. Before you even start negotiating, it's important to know your worth in the market. This means researching salaries for similar positions in your industry and location. You can use online resources like Glassdoor or Salary.com to get this information.Be confident. When you're negotiating, it's important to believe in yourself and your worth. If you don't, your employer will likely pick up on that and be less likely to give you what you want.Be prepared to walk away. If you're not happy with the offer, be prepared to walk away from the negotiation. This shows your employer that you're serious about getting what you want and that you're not afraid to walk away from a good opportunity if it's not right for you.Be flexible. It's unlikely that you'll get everything you want in a negotiation. Be prepared to compromise on some things in order to get what's most important to you.Be professional. Even if you're not happy with the offer, it's important to be professional throughout the negotiation process. This means being respectful of your employer's time and being polite even if you disagree.Negotiating a job offer can be daunting, but it's important to remember that you have the power to get what you want. To be a guest on The JOB Doctor Click HereOrder Tessa's Book "The Unspoken Truths for Career Success: Navigating Pay, Promotions, and Power at Work"