Bourbon 'n BrownTown

Caullen Hudson & David A Moran

Powered by SoapBox Productions and Organizing, Bourbon ‘n BrownTown is a conversation-based podcast that fosters radically imaginative dialogues on media, culture, politics, and our various social movements through a liberatory lens. With a Chicago focus, filmmakers and movement workers Caullen Hudson and David A. Moran unpack complex social issues and topics while building relationships with artists, activists, community organizers, educators, social entrepreneurs, and others working towards a better world. Together, BrownTown holds space to listen, learn, and liberate, all while sippin’ on sumpin’ good. Salud! Visit SoapBoxPO.com/Podcast; follow @BourbonnBrownTown on Facebook/Instagram, @BourbonnBrwnTwn on Twitter; and @SoapBoxPO on all social media. read less

Ep. 88 - New Years 2023: A Retrospective ft. Kiera Battles
23-01-2023
Ep. 88 - New Years 2023: A Retrospective ft. Kiera Battles
BrownTown on BrownTown. Now-BnB audio engineer Kiera Battles makes her debut bringing in behind-the-scenes insights to the podcast as the gang unpacks the episodes, new series, and various recording environments that made up 2022. For better or worse, here's to 2023!With 11 total full episodes, this shortened year brought 8 guest episodes (3 repeat guests), only 1 with no guests, and 2 new series (1 ongoing; 1 completed). In addition to breaking down 2022 episodes, BrownTown chops it out about episodes from 2021, the unofficial "in the age of spin" framework throughout the tenure of BnB, recording virtually versus in-person and switching locations, unions for creative industries, as well as body positivity and fat liberation. GUESTKiera Battles is the BnB audio engineer and all around audio extraordinaire who has been into music ever since starting the violin in the 4th grade and joining a choir in high school. She began her audio journey her junior year of high school and has enjoyed it ever since. Kiera graduated from Columbia College Chicago in 2022 with an Interdisciplinary degree in Audio Arts and Music Business and is currently pursuing a masters in the field at Berklee College of Music. Within these departments, she hopes to break into the music industry through both the audio and the business world! CREDITS: Audio engineered by Kiera Battles. Episode photo by Aidan Kranz. Listen to all the episodes on your chosen podcast application! For more information on the podcast, check out Bourbon 'n BrownTown on the SoapBox website.--Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 87 - Democratizing Philosophy through Identity, Environment, & Ethical Food Pathways ft. Shanti Chu
30-12-2022
Ep. 87 - Democratizing Philosophy through Identity, Environment, & Ethical Food Pathways ft. Shanti Chu
BrownTown listens, learns, and discusses how to make philosophy more accessible, environmental justice through animal rights, and ethical food pathways with Shanti Chu, philosopher, writer, speaker, and creator of ChiVeg, a dynamic food blog that focuses on ethical eating with vegetarian recipes. The team explores the topics' connections to each other through personal experiences and critical pedagogy while unpacking their relation to capitalism and white supremacy. GUESTShanti Chu (she/her/hers) is a published philosopher, writer and speaker on the topics of public philosophy, food, multiracial identity, and intersectionality. She is a philosophy professor in the Chicagoland area and makes philosophy palatable for everyday life through using innovative teaching methods. In addition to her scholarship and teaching, she is the creator of ChiVeg, a dynamic food blog that focuses on ethical eating with vegetarian recipes. Shanti also does freelance writing for TimeOut Chicago and Art News. When not actively philosophizing or thinking about food, she mixes lofi house, ambient, and moody techno under the DJ duo name Evanti. Follow her on her philosophy website and YouTube channel; follow ChiVeg on the site, Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest! Mentioned in episode and other resources:"Democratizing philosophy" was coined by Daniel Lazar, educator, podcaster, and musician. Listen to his "For a Living" podcast!Grading for EquityJohn Bolton says he ‘helped plan coups d’etat’ in other countries by Martin Pengelly (The Guardian)"Food desert" vs. "food apartheid"White co-optation of veganism and Black/indigenous traditions (1, 2)Ep. 78 - Black Farming & Finding Your Food Story ft. Pearl QuickEp. 37 - Public Health 2.0 ft. Le Greta HudsonFactory Farming Awareness CoalitionPhilosophers for SustainabilityPlant Chicago: Closed Loop, Open Source - Sustainable food productionSistah VeganCREDITS: Intro soundbite from Pearl Quick on Ep. 78 - Black Farming & Finding Your Food Story and outro music The Guns of Brixton by The Clash. Audio engineered by Kiera Battles. Episode photo by Melody Joy Co.--Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 86 - W.O.R.K. in the Age of Spin
17-12-2022
Ep. 86 - W.O.R.K. in the Age of Spin
BrownTown chops it up about WORK. Building on previous episodes about labor, unions, and trying to do liberatory work within capitalism, BrownTown contextualizes recent inflation hikes, the state of "hustle culture," and the seven-decade growth of corporate profits on the backs of the working class. While the majority of adults WORK, the propaganda that you must "earn" the right to live and be productive constantly in order to have any value has normalized harmful policies, language, and attitudes towards one another. Though COVID, the great resignation, Striketober, and other large phenomena have chipped the armor of capitalist logics and apparatuses, how do we better utilize that energy to sustain better material conditions forever and for always? Originally recorded October 25, 2022. “The reason all workers deserve a living wage is because all workers have to be alive. Not very complex” --@existentialcoms Previous episodes to listen to:Ep. 59 - Creative Jobs, Life Balance, & Working towards a Liberatory Future within Capitalism (& COVID) 2.0 ft. Genta TamashiroEp. 57 - Labor Day: Workers' Rights & Class Solidarity ft. Taylor ManessEp. 39 - Creative Jobs, Life Balance, & Working towards a Liberatory Future within CapitalismMentioned in Episode or Related Information:Katie Porter PROVES How Corporate Greed Led to Inflation, The Young TurksCEO Says He's Been "Praying for Inflation" Because It's An Excuse to Jack Up Prices by Jon Schwarz, Ken Klippenstein (The Intercept)The “Labor Shortage” Is Being Used as a Pretext to Harm Workers by Sarah Lazare (In These Times)‘Cartel-like’ Gas Companies Are Profiting Billions From the War in Ukraine by John Buckley (VICE)TV Commercials Production Department Unionizes with IATSE (Hollywood Reporter)SoapBox Editorial: Interview with Caullen and Ellen Long of KartemquinShit in a bucket vs. toilets meme by Olivia LoveAccounts to follow: @blackleftiss, @economicleft, Upstream Podcast, and more!--CREDITS: Intro soundbite from The Young Turks. Outro music Pimpin' Benjamin by Coast Contra. Audio engineered by Kiera Battles. Episode photo by Aidan Kranz.--Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 85 - The Politics of Dress, Pt. 1 ft. Hannah Linsky
30-11-2022
Ep. 85 - The Politics of Dress, Pt. 1 ft. Hannah Linsky
BrownTown invites Hannah Linsky (she/her), vintage stylist, seller, educator, and liver and breather of all things fashion to unpack the politics of dress. The friends use their experiences with clothing and fashion growing up to dissect the often overlooked yet important cultural artifact. As an everyday window into individual and collective beliefs and values, the limitless expression of how we adorn our bodies is a site for discussion around gender and patriarchy; sustainability, labor, and capitalism; and much more. The politics of dress communicate praxis of power and hierarchy yet offer an opportunity for resistance and decolonization. Stay tuned for Part 2! GUESTHannah Linsky is a vintage stylist, seller, occasional model and avid collector. She lives and breathes fashion and loves playing dress up almost as much as she loves talking fashion. She is a recent graduate of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she earned her Master’s in Art Education. Her work Revolutionary Dress centers around examining historical movements through the lens of dress.Rev Dress (site, Instagram) looks at the ways dress has been used as a strategic tool of resistance and revolution, across countries, cultures, and communities from the past and today. Dress is an important and often overlooked cultural artifact, a window into so many aspects of human life and behavior. Studying what people wore can help us understand their daily experiences, beliefs, values, social structures and so much more. We can use what we’ve learned about past people and movements to inform our choices today, and better recognize how our dress can be one tool amongst many in our collective, ongoing fight toward liberation. Mentioned in episode:TRAP House ChicagoShein controversy (1, 2, 3)SoapBox and Demand Justice clothing collaborationsHannah's recs on accounts and people to follow:Hoda Katebi -- fashion, politics, abolition, Chicago/East BayAlokvmenon -- Degendering fashion, queering fashionAja Barber --  Intersectional sustainability and politicsDressing Dykes -- Lesbian fashion historyThe Slow Factory -- Intersectional sustainability and politicsThe Zay Initiative -- The Art of Arab DressClothes Horse Podcast -- The podcast that loves clothes but hates capitalism! CREDITS: Intro soundbite from Alokvmenon and outro music Wu Wear: The Garment Renaissance by the RZA ft. Method Man & Cappadonna. Audio engineered by Kiera Battles. Episode photo by Hannah Linsky. --Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 84 - Whiskey & Watching: "Passing" ft. Sophie Elizabeth James & Pearl Quick
30-09-2022
Ep. 84 - Whiskey & Watching: "Passing" ft. Sophie Elizabeth James & Pearl Quick
BrownTown again shares space with Sophie Elizabeth James, sociologist and Unpaid Emotional Labor podcast host, and Pearl Quick, farmer, pastor, and poet extraordinaire, in the sophomore episode of our recurring "Whiskey & Watching" series. BrownTown and guests deconstruct, recontextualize, and, dare we say, decolonize popular films, TV shows, books, and more! This time the gang unpacks Passing (2021), the Rebecca Hall directorial debut (for better or worse) and film-adaptation of the Nella Larsen novel of the same name. In 1920s New York City, a light-skinned Black woman finds her world up-ended when her life becomes intertwined with a former childhood friend who is living as a white woman. The gang compares and contrasts the book to the movie, interpolates pivotal moments in the story and extrapolates what they communicate about survival, proximity to whiteness, navigating Blackness, and even the passivity of the very term "passing". Full Transcription Here! GUESTSSophie Elizabeth James is a political sociologist, project manager in the anti-human trafficking sector, and creator of the Unpaid Emotional Labor podcast. With a masters in sociology AND pop culture, she aims to provide nuance and levity to topics taken for granted.  Pearl Quick, hailing from the South Bronx, is an educator in soil science, disease ecology, genetics, and faith formation from Sarah Lawrence & Princeton University. Pearl created ‘Many Soils,’ a farming space where Black and brown youth come to learn how to decolonize their palates, look at the physical world, and grow food for themselves, their families, and their communities outside of the white gaze. CREDITS: Intro soundbite and episode photo from Passing. Audio engineered by Kiera Battles. Originally recorded June 2022. --Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 83 - “We Are More” Pt. 3: Re-entry, Combating the "Law & Order" Narrative, & the SAFE-T Act ft. Melvin Farley
23-09-2022
Ep. 83 - “We Are More” Pt. 3: Re-entry, Combating the "Law & Order" Narrative, & the SAFE-T Act ft. Melvin Farley
BrownTown links up with Melvin Farley, formerly incarcerated friend of Illinois Prison Project. In Part Three of the "We Are More" series, BrownTown and Melvin discuss re-entering society after incarceration, combating the "law and order" narrative and resurgent fear-mongering politics tactics, as well as the much talked about Illinois SAFE-T Act that goes into full effect January 1, 2023. Watch the micro-docs, listen to the series, and take action at SoapBoxPO.com/We-Are-More and IllinoisPrisonProject.org.Melvin's initially shares his experience with incarceration and how the Illinois Prison Project supported in his release. The team then details some of the inner workings of the prison system and as well as the adjustments and setbacks when re-entering society. BrownTown unpacks the grassroots work that lead up to the signing of the Illinois SAFE-T Act, particularly the Pretrial Fairness Act provision, and dispels the misinformation, disinformation, and straight up lies about the new law that have been circling this season. While comparing such right-wing and establishment tactics to those of yesteryear (i.e. Willie Hortonism and fake FBI-created Black Panther Party newspapers), the gang embraces the progressive changes to come in the region while situating them within a larger struggle.Full Transcription Here!GUESTMelvin Farley is an affiliate of the Illinois Prison Project who was released from incarceration 18 months ago due to the organization’s efforts. He is currently establishing structure for his new life and looking forward to new opportunities and relationships. Mentioned in Episode:Illinois - Pretrial Fairness START HERE!The 2021 SAFE-T Act: ICJIA Roles and Responsibilities (Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority)How a ‘Purge’ law misinformation campaign could undercut landmark criminal justice reform by Tiffany Walden (TRiiBE)No, There Is No ‘Purge Law’ In Illinois. Here Are The Facts About Ending Cash Bail by Asimo & Sabino (Block Club Chi)There’s no ‘Purge Law’: Debunking right-wing propaganda about the SAFE-T Act by Carlos Ballesteros (Injustice Watch)Axios article on fake newspaperEpisode Correction: The FBI, not the CIA, created fake newspapers to dispel the Black Panther Party's image via the infamous COINTELPRO (but CIA still trash, doe). ILLINOIS PRISON PROJECT (IPP)Through advocacy, public education, and direct representation, the Illinois Prison Project brings hope to and fight in community with incarcerated people and their loved ones for a brighter, more humane, more just system for us all. Learn more about the IPP on their site; follow them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and YouTube.  CREDITS: Intro soundbite from Renaldo Hudson of the "We Are More" micro-doc series and outro soundbite from Melvin Farley. Audio engineered by Kiera Battles. Episode photo by Kiera Battles. This series is sponsored by the Illinois Prison Project.--Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 82 - “We Are More” Pt. 2: Transforming Systems & Community Organizing after Incarceration ft. Dyanna Winchester
20-08-2022
Ep. 82 - “We Are More” Pt. 2: Transforming Systems & Community Organizing after Incarceration ft. Dyanna Winchester
BrownTown sits down with Dyanna Winchester, Decarceration Organizer with Live Free Illinois. In Part Two of the "We Are More" series, BrownTown and Dyanna discuss organizing against and within institutions to disrupt dangerous policy, addressing intracommunal violence with interpersonal relationships, supporting re-entry after being incarcerated, and more. Watch the micro-docs, listen to the series, and take action at SoapBoxPO.com/We-Are-More and IllinoisPrisonProject.org.Dyanna's shares her experience with incarceration before the team delves into policy-driven factors like the Truth in Sentencing Act and the barriers folks formerly incarcerated folks face upon re-integrating into society after being released. They also touch on the nuances and history of faith-based organizing, particularly in the Black community, as well as Live Free's full free campaign and clean state initiative. What does freedom really look like? Here's their take.Full Transcription Here!GUESTDyanna Winchester is a Chicago-born, formerly incarcerated organizer and mother of two boys, one of whom was tragically killed from gun violence within the city. She received her associates degree in Liberal arts from Lakeland College and is currently studying to get her Bachelor of Science in Business Management. Dyanna spent 20 years in the prison system and has worn many hats of employment while facing barriers to financial stability due to being system-impacted. Her most influential roles have been a Community Navigator/Case Manager/Career Coach at Howard Area Community Center. Now, she is passionate about her new role as Decarceration Organizer with Live Free Illinois where she can bring forth change both in our communities and at the policy level to help deliver the liberty and dignity we all deserve. When not in her Live Free Illinois role, she enjoys loving on her family, playing with dogs, exercising, and helping others. ILLINOIS PRISON PROJECT (IPP)Through advocacy, public education, and direct representation, the Illinois Prison Project brings hope to and fight in community with incarcerated people and their loved ones for a brighter, more humane, more just system for us all. Learn more about the IPP on their site; follow them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and YouTube.  CREDITS: Intro soundbite from Michael Penny of the "We Are More" micro-doc series and outro soundbite from Dyanna Winchester. Audio engineered by Kiera Battles. This series is sponsored by the Illinois Prison Project.--Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 81 - “We Are More” Pt. 1: Redefining False Narratives & Disrupting Trajectories of Women in Prison ft. Sandra Brown
15-07-2022
Ep. 81 - “We Are More” Pt. 1: Redefining False Narratives & Disrupting Trajectories of Women in Prison ft. Sandra Brown
BrownTown shares virtual space with Sandra Brown, formerly incarcerated survivor and current Senior Advisor and Visiting Scholar with the Women’s Justice Institute (WJI). In Part One of the "We Are More" series, BrownTown and Sandra discuss the four leading criminal legal system trends that have spurred the rise in women's mass incarceration and meet them with five fundamental rights and needs as pathways to justice (WJI). At the intersection of carcerality and patriarchy, the team collectively addresses and assesses root causes and ways to reverse women’s incarceration on the path towards prison abolition. Watch the micro-docs, listen to the series, and take action at SoapBoxPO.com/We-Are-More and IllinoisPrisonProject.org.Full transcription here!GUESTSandra Brown is a Chicago native with a love for learning and helping others. When she became an incarcerated survivor, she spent over half of her sentence working as a teaching assistant while striving to earn an education via correspondence courses. She has helped countless women earn their GEDs as well as complete various vocational programs. For almost a decade, she served as president of Toastmasters: A Woman’s Voice, where she developed communication and leadership opportunities for up to 60 women each session. Barriers that Brown experienced during her own educational and empowerment journey while incarcerated undergirds the work that she does now as a Senior Advisor and Visiting Scholar with the Women’s Justice Institute (WJI) in Chicago. Though Brown lives in Los Angeles, she works to promote economic and educational opportunities to other justice-impacted women. Some of her advocacy work entails developing curriculum aimed at understanding decarceration and domestic violence as well as writing policy papers recommending ways to support quality higher education degree programs to women who are incarcerated. Her book Odyssey in Progress is now available and she has a piece featured in the reSentencing Journal, published by Tufts University. Mentioned in episode:Women's Incarceration Rates Are Skyrocketing. These Advocates Are Trying to Change That by Nazish Dholakia (Versa)Twitter thread on crime reporting in the media (Alex Karakatsanis)Organizations: Black and Pink, Moms United Against Violence and Incarceration, Restorative Justice Illinois, Live Free Illinois, Life Span"Justice for women isn’t only what happens between arrest and prison. It’s what happens before, during, and after it." --Women's Justice Institute ILLINOIS PRISON PROJECT (IPP)Through advocacy, public education, and direct representation, the Illinois Prison Project brings hope to and fight in community with incarcerated people and their loved ones for a brighter, more humane, more just system for us all. Learn more about the IPP on their site; follow them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and YouTube.  CREDITS: Intro music from the Women's Justice Initiative website and outro soundbite from Sandra Brown. Audio engineered by Kiera Battles. This series is sponsored by the Illinois Prison Project.--Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
TRAILER - The "We Are More" Series
02-07-2022
TRAILER - The "We Are More" Series
BrownTown brings you the "We Are More" campaign series! The podcast extension of SoapBox's micro-doc video series with the Illinois Prison Project centers the experiences of incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people, and pushes back against fear-mongering “tough on crime” rhetoric and policies resurging in the 2022 election season. With the support of directly-impacted guests, BrownTown unpacks the revanchist history of these dangerous policies, recent media sensationalism, and the importance of media literacy through an abolitionist lens. Watch the micro-docs, listen to the series, and take action at SoapBoxPO.com/We-Are-More and IllinoisPrisonProject.org.Full Transcriptions here! ILLINOIS PRISON PROJECT (IPP)Through advocacy, public education, and direct representation, the Illinois Prison Project brings hope to and fight in community with incarcerated people and their loved ones for a brighter, more humane, more just system for us all. Learn more about the IPP on their site; follow them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and YouTube.  CREDITS: Intro/outro soundbites from SoapBox "We Are More" micro-docs of Renaldo Hudson (intro) and Anthony Jones (outro), edited by James Edward Murray. Audio engineered by Kiera Battles. Episode photo by Aidan Kranz. This series is sponsored by the Illinois Prison Project.--Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 80 - Remapping, Electoralism, & Challenging the Border Myth ft. Stephanie Skora
18-06-2022
Ep. 80 - Remapping, Electoralism, & Challenging the Border Myth ft. Stephanie Skora
BrownTown chops it up about electoral politics, the remap process post-2020 Census, borders and anti-Zionism, and much more with repeat guest (Ep. 60) Stephanie Skora, movement worker and creator of the popular "Girl, I Guess" Progressive Voter Guide. The gang again takes on the nuances of engaging in electoralism while holding radical politics and the importance international solidarity between colonized peoples. Originally recorded May 16, 2022, before the new Chicago ward map was approved.Spring 2022 marks two years since the most recent Census where the new representational map of our political reality has changed to, so we’re told, better reflect our lived populations. It has also been one year after renewed worldwide attention on the Israeli occupation, specifically in the Palestenian neighborhood of Sheikh Jarrah. How do we place the remap process within the broader system of American electoralism, for better or worse? More broadly, how do we conceptualize not only the invisible lines of representational democracy based on population in America but also the more militarily enforced borders that manufacture our economic and political reality to justify the state’s existence, globally? This is their take.Full transcription here!GUESTStephanie Skora is a hard femme Lesbian, trans woman, and anti-Zionist working class Ashkenazi Jew whose activist work centers around Palestinian solidarity organizing, queering Jewish spaces, and fighting for justice and liberation for all trans people. She is the COO of Brave Space Alliance, the South Side LGBTQ Center, the Board President of the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, a longtime member of Jewish Voice for Peace, and the author and editor of the "Girl, I Guess" Progressive Voter Guide. Check out Stephanie's site and follow her on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Mentioned in episode and more information:SoapBox's Census 2020 projectNicole Lee and the 11th Ward, Chicago (Block Club Chi)The Ferguson-Palestine connection (1, 2, 3)Hoda Katebi on holding your institutions accountableOpinions on this episode only reflect David, Caullen, and Stephanie as individuals, not their organizations or places of work.CREDITS: Intro music from I Was a Teenage Anarchist by Against Me! and outro music Payback by Immortal Technique ft. Diabolic and Ras Kass. Audio engineered by Kiera Battles.--Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 79 - Whiskey & Watching: "The Batman" ft. Sophie Elizabeth James & Pearl Quick
27-05-2022
Ep. 79 - Whiskey & Watching: "The Batman" ft. Sophie Elizabeth James & Pearl Quick
BrownTown is again joined by Sophie Elizabeth James, sociologist and Unpaid Emotional Labor podcast host, and Pearl Quick, farmer, pastor, and poet extraordinaire, in the inaugural episode of our recurring "Whiskey & Watching" series. BrownTown and guests deconstruct, recontextualize, and, dare we say, decolonize popular films, TV shows, books, and more! In our first take, the homies take on The Batman, the 2022 Matt Reeves live-action feature version of the cape crusader's anthology. From analyzing the city of Gotham as a character in-and-of-itself to this new "emo Batman" to the Riddler as a 4Chan influencer ("like and subscribe, guys!"), the squad brings their own backgrounds and perspectives into how they've received new iterations of Batman throughout the decades and center the importance of media literacy even, and especially, with large blockbusters.Full transcription here!GUESTSSophie Elizabeth James is a political sociologist, project manager in the anti-human trafficking sector, and creator of the Unpaid Emotional Labor podcast. With a masters in sociology AND pop culture, she aims to provide nuance and levity to topics taken for granted.  Pearl Quick, hailing from the South Bronx, is an educator in soil science, disease ecology, genetics, and faith formation from Sarah Lawrence & Princeton University. Pearl created ‘Many Soils,’ a farming space where Black and brown youth come to learn how to decolonize their palates, look at the physical world, and grow food for themselves, their families, and their communities outside of the white gaze. CREDITS: Intro music from the 1960's Batman theme song by the Ventures and outro music from 2022's The Batman theme song by Michael Giacchino. Audio engineered by Kiera Battles. Episode photo from The Batman. --Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 78 - Black Farming & Finding Your Food Story ft. Pearl Quick
07-05-2022
Ep. 78 - Black Farming & Finding Your Food Story ft. Pearl Quick
BrownTown breaks bread with long-time homie Pearl Quick, soil science educator, farmer, and pastor as they discuss the histories of Black, brown, and indigenous farming practices while navigating the relationship and resistance to oppressive institutions, and what it means to decolonize our food systems.Full transcription here!GUESTHailing from the South Bronx, Pearl Quick is an educator in soil science, disease ecology, genetics, and faith formation from Sarah Lawrence & Princeton University. Pearl created Many Soils, a farming space where Black and brown youth come to learn how to decolonize their palates, look at the physical world, and grow food for themselves, their families, and their communities outside of the white gaze.Mentioned in episode and more information:SoapBox's Crossroads and Street Vendors Association Micro-DocSoul Fire Farm (New York) and Chicago City FarmCaullen's Climate Change MemeLucia Leon -- LinkedIn, Farm Website (Chicago)"Black Farmers Sow the Seeds for the Future" (In These Times)"How do you estimate theft from slavery?" (Vox)Black Farmers - If You Don’t Know, Now You Know (The Daily Show)Justice for Black Farmers (MSNBC)"All-American Farms" (S5E2), United Shades of America (CNN) CREDITS: Intro soundbite from AJ+ and outro music Rainforest by Noname. Audio engineered by Kiera Battles. Episode photo by Pearl Quick. --Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 77 - Independent Media Creation in the Age of Spin (& Capital) ft. Sophie Elizabeth James
29-04-2022
Ep. 77 - Independent Media Creation in the Age of Spin (& Capital) ft. Sophie Elizabeth James
BrownTown gets meta with return guest Sophie Elizabeth James, sociologist, program manager in the anti-human trafficking sector, and creator of the Unpaid Emotional Labor podcast. The team dissects our current independent media landscape and the digital and socio-political histories that make it up. While they center their own experience in making films and podcasts and using social media, they also lean into noteworthy media events in relation to dominant narratives on "propaganda", media literacy, and the issues of too many dudes with podcasts.Full Transcriptions Here!GUESTSophie Elizabeth James is a political sociologist and project manager in the anti-human trafficking sector and creator of the Unpaid Emotional Labor podcast. With a masters in sociology AND pop culture, she aims to provide nuance and levity to topics taken for granted. She is most interested in how folx negotiate their identities in the sociopolitical and engaging in a system that seeks to destroy. Her favorite pastimes are verbally eviscerating bored trolls with expert use of their colonized language. Follow Sophie on Instagram and Unpaid Emotional Labor on Instagram and Patreon.Mentioned in episode:Joseph Goebbels and “Triumph of the Will”Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer TimesMedia Literacy informationLil' Wayne - "Live from the 504" FreestyleEp. 46 - Exploring Blackness & Cultural Media ft. Courtney Phillips & Matthew Manning of Gumbo Media CREDITS: Intro/outro music XXX by Kendrick Lamar. Audio engineered by Kiera Battles. Episode photo by Victoria Price.--Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 76 - Surveillance Capitalism & Abolitionist Tech, Pt. 2 ft. Alyxandra Goodwin
23-10-2021
Ep. 76 - Surveillance Capitalism & Abolitionist Tech, Pt. 2 ft. Alyxandra Goodwin
BrownTown spills even more the tea on in part two of the surveillance capitalism and abolitionist tech conversation with Alyx Goodwin, currently a Deputy Campaign Director on Policing and Incarceration at the Action Center on Race and the Economy (ACRE), organizes with BYP100 Chicago, and is a co-founder and writer with LEFT OUT Magazine.Alyx and BrownTown pick up where they left off centering a couple reminders and updates before the dig in. The gang discusses the observations and broader lessons from the October 4th Chicago Police Department budget hearing, then-updates of the #StopShotSpotter campaign (1, 2), and the global ramifications of Facebook going down for several hours before unpacking policing as a logic, disaster capitalism, and the bias of tech. Alyx and Caullen discuss how prison tech came home during COVID-19 lockdowns and the advantages of public tech. David re-introduces the role of popular culture in both reinforcing copaganda and problematic systems while also offering heightened critiques of such "fictional" future worlds with tech and spectacle at the forefront. Caullen offers his abolitionist and anti-capitalist critiques of RoboCop (1987) and its early 90's sequels, RoboCop (2014), The Running Man (1987), Demolition Man (1993), and Minority Report (2002) while David and Alyx build out the real world implications, deducing the highly reflexive relationship between art and culture. Once again, they close out encouraging us to interrogate not only the uses of new technologies, but the technologies themselves as well as the unaltered violent systems that they often embolden. If surveillance capitalism and the prison-industrial complex is the puppet master of technology, who is the show for? Here's their take. Originally recorded October 7, 2021. Listen to Part One!NOTE: Content warning for gunshot sounds and spoiler alert for aforementioned films--Corrections and information on films mentioned:RoboCop  (2014) - 5 Reasons Why RoboCop 2014 Isn’t As Bad As People Say It Is (& 5 Reasons It Is) (Screenrant)RoboCop (2014) - Opening scene takes place in Tehran, Iran, presented as "Operation: Tehran" in the film.The Politics of Demolition Man (video)The Running Man (1987) synopsis: By 2017, the United States has become a totalitarian police state following a worldwide economic collapse. The government pacifies the populace through The Running Man, a broadcast game show, where criminals fight for their lives as "runners", fleeing from armed mercenaries named the "stalkers", to earn a state pardon.Mentioned in episode and extra information:Shoshana Zuboff featured in 'The goal is to automate us': Welcome to the Age of Surveillance Capitalism (Naughton, The Guardian)Gang database under a new fancy name Criminal Enterprise Information System (CEIS) (MacArthur Justice Center)Operation Legend is Bringing Surveillance Tech to Cities (Schwenk, The Intercept)Students Are Pushing Back Against Proctoring Surveillance Apps (Kelly, EFF)For Tech to be equitable, the people must control it (Alyx Goodwin, LEFT OUT)Issues in "crime" reporting  (Alex Karakatsanis)Afghan Activist: We All Deserve Refuge, Not Just Those Who Served the U.S. (Lazare, In These Times)Where Counter-terrorism Got Us  (Todd St. Hill, LEFT OUT)General McKenzie apologies for Kabul strike killing 10 civilians, not ISIS-K (Smith, The Guardian)Plans for $400-billion new city in the American desert unveiled (Holland, CNN)Dystopian world’: Singapore patrol robots stoke fears of surveillance state (France-Presse, The Guardian)Chicago Drill 'n' Activism cross-platform documentary and multimedia project on drill rap and activismObama CBA Coalition and SoapBox projectPredictive policing and Chicago's Heat List (The Verge)Neighborhoods Watched: The Rise of Urban Mass Surveillance (Stein, et. al)Social justice solutions for BIPOC communities (SXSW)Citizens Police Data ProjectTech is Not Neutral--Follow Alyxandra on Instagram and Twitter! Read her and others' work at LEFTOUTmag.com and follow LEFT OUT on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Sign the #StopShotSpotter petition and take action with the toolkit! Watch SoapBox's Stop ShotSpotter PSA here!Follow ACRE on their site, Facebook, Instagram, and Medium; and BYP100 on their site, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.--CREDITS: Intro soundbite from SoapBox's Stop ShotSpotter PSA edited by James Edward Murray and outro song Police State by Dead Prez. Audio engineered by Genta Tamashiro and Kiera Battles. Episode graphic from the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Three Interactive Tools for Understanding Police Surveillance article.--Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 76 - Surveillance Capitalism & Abolitionist Tech, Pt. 1 ft. Alyxandra Goodwin
30-09-2021
Ep. 76 - Surveillance Capitalism & Abolitionist Tech, Pt. 1 ft. Alyxandra Goodwin
BrownTown spills the tea on surveillance capitalism and talks abolitionist tech with Alyxandra Goodwin, who is recently organizing the #StopShotSpotter campaign in Chicago. In part one of this two-part episode, the gang unpack surveillance in various forms from policing to social media while unpacking the many intricacies and insidious ways it controls our lives from the most intimate to the most systemic.Alyx and the gang quickly digs into the relationship between social media tech surveillance and large corporations, stating that these industries are moving faster than state regulation can keep up with or can even understand (see Zuckerberg vs. Congress). Alyx unpacks her article The True Dilemma: Silicon Valley, Race & Profit while BrownTown turns the surveillance conversation to the prison-industrial complex (PIC). As capitalism's output is always profit above all, we see the PIC's usage of surveillance to further the protection of that profit on top of uplifting the anti-Blackness, white supremacy, and the overall quell of dissent that it was founded on.BrownTown and Alyx sift through numerous related topics with surveillance and social control at the forefront, centering the current Chicago campaign to cancel the ShotSpotter contract with Chicago Police Department (which several other cities have done). LEFTOUT comrade and writer Todd St. Hill's article Where Counter-terrorism Got Us adds weight to the turn of surveillance in the U.S. after 9/11 as we reflect on the two-decade-long war in Afghanistan and the new departments and machines of surveillance that it yielded. David transitions the conversation out by asking about media narratives and pop culture's role in furthering copaganda and acceptance of new technologies without interrogating the unaltered violent systems that they often embolden. If technology is a mere puppet, surveillance capitalism and the prison-industrial complex is the puppet master. Originally recorded September 15, 2021. Listen to Part Two!GUESTAlyx is currently a Deputy Campaign Director on Policing and Incarceration at the Action Center on Race and the Economy (ACRE), organizes with BYP100 Chicago, and is a co-founder and writer with LEFT OUT Magazine. Her writing and activism are centered around the momentum and challenges of building Black power and self-determination. Her work at ACRE currently focuses on the relationship between the finance industry and policing, racialized capitalism, and how they exacerbate oppressions.--Mentioned in episode and other information:Shoshana Zuboff's workThe Age of Surveillance Capitalism (book)The Surveillance Threat Is Not What Orwell Imagined'The goal is to automate us': Welcome to the Age of Surveillance Capitalism (Naughton)A Company That Designs Jails is Spying On Activists Who Oppose Them (Fassler) on corporate counterinsurgencyOperation Legend is Bringing Surveillance Tech to Cities (Schwenk)Raptivist Bella BAHHS on the history of Chicago gangs and machine politics (TRiiBE)Chicago Drill 'n' Activism cross-platform documentary and multimedia project on drill rap and activismBnB Ep. 21 - Welcome to the Gun Show (on US vs. UK drill rap)Texas police surveillance: HALO cameras, BnB Episode 73Stingray technology for phone trackingErase the (Gang) Database in Chicago (coalition, SoapBox project)For Tech to be equitable, the people must control it (Alyx Goodwin, LEFTOUT)CPD Settlement for men wrongfully accused of murder (article, SoapBox project)EndPoliceSurveillance.comChicagoPoliceSurvelliance.comElectronic Frontier Foundation--Sign the #StopShotSpotter petition and take action with the toolkit! Watch SoapBox's Stop ShotSpotter PSA here!Follow Alyxandra on Instagram and Twitter! Read her and others' work at LEFTOUTmag.com and follow LEFT OUT on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.Follow ACRE on their site, Facebook, Instagram, and Medium; and BYP100 on their site, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.--CREDITS: Intro soundbite from SoapBox's Stop ShotSpotter PSA edited by James Edward Murray and outro song Feds Watching by 2 Chainz ft. Pharrell. Audio engineered by Genta Tamashiro and Kiera Battles. Episode graphic by Ellen Hao from South Side Weekly's Shot Heard Round the City article.--Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 75 - Youth Radio: Inside & Out ft. Simone St. Pierre Nelson & Stories by Youth Incarcerated in Seattle
30-08-2021
Ep. 75 - Youth Radio: Inside & Out ft. Simone St. Pierre Nelson & Stories by Youth Incarcerated in Seattle
BrownTown and Simone discuss the power of youth radio in this episode that includes three (3) full audio stories produced by and featuring teens incarcerated in Seattle. In April 2021, Simone, David, and Caullen worked with the teens to create the featured stories in a two-day workshop with KUOW Radioactive Youth Media. They discuss the importance of authentic narratives in media creation, intergenerational youth programming, and uplifting justice-involved youth while navigating inequitable social conditions and the institutions that reinforce them. Collectively, BrownTown and Simone unpack their personal proximity to these themes, the pitfalls of adultism, and zoom out to compare and contrast the obvious stark differences and invisible similarities between restorative justice and the carceral system; and commissary and capitalism.As creators of media who work with younger people and were, of course, younger people ourselves, how do we make spaces not only accessible to youth of various ages but also create sustainable conditions where they can thrive and we can build together? From an abolitionist lens, how does this lend itself to making presence outside of normative, hierarchical structure that we may have been brought up in? Here's their take.GUESTSimone St. Pierre Nelson (all pronouns) is an 18-year-old writer and audio producer who is passionate about radio, education justice, and police and prison abolition. Simone produces and teaches with RadioActive Youth Media at KUOW Public Radio, hosts a podcast amplifying youth organizers for Student Voice, and was an intern and facilitator for the Seattle-based National Center for Restorative Justice. Simone lives with their family in Issaquah, Washington, and is headed to college in California in the fall. When Simone isn't teaching and making radio, you can find them playing dungeons and dragons or walking their dog.--Follow Simone on Twitter, Instagram, listen to her podcast Students Speak Out, and follow her work at KUOW. Follow Student Voice on their site and Linktree.Audio stories from 'They can never lock your mind up.' Three stories from juvenile jail (in order of episode and article):'More than my name.' [transcript] -- Milli, Shadow and Glow discuss observing Ramadan in jail, what they do for joy, and what makes them proud.'Can't nobody make you change. You got to change yourself.' [transcript]-- Milli, Tilley and Trilly say job training, mentorship and access to youth programs— not incarceration— is what King County youth need to thrive.'Your body is in jail but your mind is not.' [transcript] -- From brushing their teeth to "smacking some snacks," J-Wow, T-Dog and EJ take listeners through a day in juvenile detention.RadioActive Youth Media is where young people discover public radio journalism and gain access to the skills, community and institutional resources that spur their growth as media makers. Through their stories, listeners of all ages gain a deeper understanding of young people whose voices are rarely heard by the greater public (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter).--CREDITS: Intro song World in My Hands by Saba ft. Smino and Legit and outro song Guerrilla Radio by Rage Against the Machine. Audio engineered by Genta Tamashiro and Kiera Battles. Episode photo by Megan Sobchuk.Special thanks to KUOW RadioActive for letting BrownTown amplify youth stories!--Bourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
BONUS - The Collective Freedom Project: Debrief
21-08-2021
BONUS - The Collective Freedom Project: Debrief
In the first recording since the Collective Freedom Project (CFP) series, Caullen and David debrief on the series' conversations, producing the project behind-the-scenes, as well as unpack previously unheard material. Caullen outlines the timeline of SoapBox's journey in the Collective Freedom Project and what it was like pitching the podcast series. David unpacks some of the difficulties and limitations with producing even long-form audio stories, in that there is always more to explore with guests and subjects. BrownTown discusses other campaigns, past episodes, cultural/regional differences in organizing, and issues with the olympics.THE COLLECTIVE FREEDOM PROJECTThe CFP is a movement media and resource hub that tells the stories of the local and regional efforts where people — both U.S. citizens and non U.S. citizens — are coming together to fight unique campaigns against criminalization in their communities. From Chicago to California, Atlanta to Texas, activists, organizers, and communities are rising up to fight against criminalization and violence in varied yet connected forms.Mentioned in episode:Ep. 64 - Non-Profit industrial Complex ft. Lizette GarzaFinal Five CampaignGulf on Fire memeCaullen & David Interviewed with Boston DSA on #NoCopAcademy#NoCopAcademy (1, 2)Lit Review Podcast--Through the CFP, SoapBox created a micro-doc on the Erase the Gang Database coalition and campaign in Chicago, which you can find among other cities/regions' videos, podcast episodes, and a plethora of resources on CollectiveFreedomProject.org/Multimedia.Follow the Collective Freedom Project on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube. --CREDITS: Intro/outro music by Genta Tamashiro. Audio engineered by Genta Tamashiro and Kiera Battles. Episode photo by Sean Robert Kelly.This series is sponsored by the Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC) and the Four Freedoms Fund (FFF).--The Collective Freedom ProjectSite | Multimedia | Campaigns | ResourcesBourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 74 - The Collective Freedom Project, Pt. 4: California & #Budget2SaveLives ft. Sandy Valenciano
09-07-2021
Ep. 74 - The Collective Freedom Project, Pt. 4: California & #Budget2SaveLives ft. Sandy Valenciano
BrownTown listens, learns, and breaks down California's state-wide efforts for a just budget, to resist immigrant detention, and advance alternatives to incarceration, especially on the onset of COVID-19 with Sandy Valenciano. Watch the micro-docs, listen to the series, and take action at CollectiveFreedomProject.org/Multimedia.Similar to Part Three of the CFP series with Austin, Texas, Sandy debunks the myth of California as progressive bubble it's often painted from the outside. She breaks down some of the socio-political geography of the state and the reasoning behind putting energy into state-wide legislative battles. Her and BrownTown unpack the role electoral organizing plays in budget and decriminalization fights as well as unpack the power of district attorneys. Sandy explains the threat to AB 32 (California's private prison ban) from Biden's DOJ as the group analyzes and uplifts the #DignityNotDetention and #Budget2SaveLives campaigns and what it takes to win a decriminalization agenda.GUESTSandy (she/they) is crimmigration strategist, who organizes at the intersection of criminal justice and immigrant rights with an abolition framework. Sandy is an immigrant from Zacatecas, Mexico, who has spent most of her life in the Bay Area. Sandy graduated from Sonoma State University, where she obtained her Bachelors in Psychology. Sandy led leadership development and campaign strategy while at the California Immigrant Youth Justice Alliance (CIYJA), where she served as the Executive Director. She has organized grassroots efforts to build community defense models to stop the criminalization, detention and deportation of immigrant communities.THE COLLECTIVE FREEDOM PROJECTThis episode is Part Four in the Collective Freedom Project four-part series with Bourbon 'n BrownTown. The Collective Freedom Project (CFP) is a movement media and resource hub that tells the stories of the local and regional efforts where people — both U.S. citizens and non U.S. citizens — are coming together to fight unique campaigns against criminalization in their communities. From Chicago to California, Atlanta to Texas, activists, organizers, and communities are rising up to fight against criminalization and violence in varied yet connected forms.--Mentioned in the episode:Chicago VotesOakland Police Department re-allocating funds away from police and towards communities over time (1, 2)Defund Oakland Police Department - Anti-Police Terror Project (Oakland, CA)2019 Chicago City Council meeting - pastor's speech (starts at 2:24)Follow the Collective Freedom Project on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.Follow Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC) on their site, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Follow Dignity Not Detention - California on Facebook, Twitter, and read their guide here. Follow Freedom for Immigrants on their site, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter; and the #Budget2SaveLives campaign here.--CREDITS: Intro/outro music by Genta Tamashiro with excerpts from the California CFP video; outro song California Love by Tupac ft. Dr. Dre. Audio engineered by Genta Tamashiro and Kiera Battles.This series is sponsored by the Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC) and the Four Freedoms Fund (FFF).--The Collective Freedom ProjectSite | Multimedia | Campaigns | ResourcesBourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 73 - The Collective Freedom Project, Pt. 3: Texas & #ShutDownHutto ft. Rebecca Sanchez & David Johnson
08-07-2021
Ep. 73 - The Collective Freedom Project, Pt. 3: Texas & #ShutDownHutto ft. Rebecca Sanchez & David Johnson
BrownTown links up with Rebecca Sanchez & David Johnson of Grassroots Leadership in Austin, Texas. In Part Three of the Collective Freedom Project series, they discuss the the socio-political climate in Austin, the #DefundAPD campaign(s); #ShutDownHutto and other campaigns to close or halt construction of new jails; and the intersections of technology, surveillance, and gentrification.BrownTown and guests cover several interrelated topics throughout the course of their time together. After Rebecca and David (or "DJ") share more about their backgrounds, they quickly debunk the myth of Austin as the liberal blue bubble in a sea of red Texas, explaining the history, the municipal political system (weak Mayor vs. strong Mayor), and the social facade. DJ likens the 1-35 interstate in Texas with the Dan Ryan Expressway in Chicago explaining how they were both built intentionally to subjugate Black people. The team continues to sift through various topics including the affect of the George Floyd uprisings on specifically budget campaigns, #NoCopAcademy (1, 2), academic institutions and private companies' relationship with police, and the role of technology in surveillance and furthering social control. BrownTown, Rebecca, and DJ close out the an introspective note that abolishing police is more than just the defunding and dismantling the local PD but abolishing the police in our heads, in our hearts, and creating new relationships between people and our natural environment.GUESTSRebecca Sanchez is the daughter of Jose and Rosalia Sanchez, the youngest of 8 and a tia to 17; from a tiny town in East Texas. Rebecca is an artist, educator, and the organizing manager with Grassroots Leadership, a nonprofit working to end prison profiteering, mass incarceration, deportation, and criminalization. She is also a member of Communities of Color United; an intergenerational grassroots group pushing for racial equity in Austin. All of this work is guided by the lens of artivism, personal/familial struggles, and her experience as a former art teacher in a commitment to center intergenerational creativity, healing, and autonomy.David Johnson is an organizer and policy and research analyst who draws upon his personal experience with white supremacist culture to work towards a collective divestment from harmful and violent practices, policies, and systems, while expanding investment in people-centered responses to community needs. In addition to his role at Grassroots Leadership, he is a member of Texas Advocates for Justice, the Community Strategy Team for the University of Texas' Dell Medical School Department of Population Health, the Reimagine Public Safety Task Force for the City of Austin, the Mayor's Gun Violence Task Force for the City of Austin, and the board of BRAVE Communities. He is also a community ambassador for Solstice Recovery Foundation, and the co-founder of the Coalition to Abolish Slavery - Texas (CAST).THE COLLECTIVE FREEDOM PROJECTThis episode is Part Two in the Collective Freedom Project four-part series with Bourbon 'n BrownTown. The Collective Freedom Project (CFP) is a movement media and resource hub that tells the stories of the local and regional efforts where people — both U.S. citizens and non U.S. citizens — are coming together to fight unique campaigns against criminalization in their communities. From Chicago to California, Atlanta to Texas, activists, organizers, and communities are rising up to fight against criminalization and violence in varied yet connected forms.--Mentioned in the episode:Moving Texas ForwardMichael Ramos (1, 2, 3)Austin City-Community Reimagining Public Safety Task Force#NoNewYouthJail in Seattle, WashingtonAustin's Big Secret: How Big Tech and Surveillance Are Increasing PolicingStrategic Decision Support Centers in ChicagoShot Spotter in Chicago (1, 2, 3, 4, 5)Dave Chappelle, "Racism out in the open"Follow the Collective Freedom Project on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.Follow Grassroots Leadership on their site, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Follow Communities of Color United on their site, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.--CREDITS: Intro/outro music by Genta Tamashiro with excerpts from the Texas CFP video; outro song Crooked Officer by Z-Ro. Audio engineered by Genta Tamashiro and Kiera Battles.This series is sponsored by the Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC) and the Four Freedoms Fund (FFF).--The Collective Freedom ProjectSite | Multimedia | Campaigns | ResourcesBourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support
Ep. 72 - The Collective Freedom Project, Pt. 2: Atlanta & #CloseTheJailATL ft. Denise Ruben
07-07-2021
Ep. 72 - The Collective Freedom Project, Pt. 2: Atlanta & #CloseTheJailATL ft. Denise Ruben
BrownTown chops it up with Denise Ruben as they discuss the #CloseTheJailATL campaign and coalition. The Atlanta City Detention Center (ACDC) was built in preparation for the 1996 Summer Olympics as the "extra jail" in Atlanta and previously was divided into two sides — the "city side" and the ICE side. The campaign won legislation in May 2019 to close and repurpose the jail through a community-led taskforce but is still fighting to repurpose the facility into a Center for Wellness & Freedom, reallocate $32.5 million back into the community, and decriminalize the "broken windows" offenses that populated the jail.Denise shares her experience being system-impacted and starting her work with Women on the Rise. Her and BrownTown discuss coalition-building across identities and the importance of investing in communities on the front-end of social issues versus on the back-end with incarceration, punishment, and criminalization. Now summer 2021, Denise updates BrownTown on the current struggles with the campaign as Mayor Lance Bottoms of Atlanta who initially championed #CloseTheJailATL is not running for re-election this fall and the County makes plans to utilize the jail as an overflow facility.GUESTDenise Ruben is a lead organizer with Women on the Rise - Georgia. Women on the Rise is a grassroots organization led by women of color who are targeted and/or impacted by the legal system. Women on the Rise works to educate, heal, and empower themselves, one another and our communities to demand justice, dignity, and liberation for all.THE COLLECTIVE FREEDOM PROJECTThis episode is Part Two in the Collective Freedom Project four-part series with Bourbon 'n BrownTown. The Collective Freedom Project (CFP) is a movement media and resource hub that tells the stories of the local and regional efforts where people — both U.S. citizens and non U.S. citizens — are coming together to fight unique campaigns against criminalization in their communities. From Chicago to California, Atlanta to Texas, activists, organizers, and communities are rising up to fight against criminalization and violence in varied yet connected forms.--Follow the Collective Freedom Project on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.Follow Women on the Rise on their site, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Support the #CloseTheJailATL effort at CloseTheJailATL.org.--CREDITS: Intro/outro music by Genta Tamashiro with excerpts from the Atlanta CFP video; outro song Better by ALAZ. Audio engineered by Genta Tamashiro and Kiera Battles.This series is sponsored by the Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC) and the Four Freedoms Fund (FFF).--The Collective Freedom ProjectSite | Multimedia | Campaigns | ResourcesBourbon ’n BrownTownFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | PatreonSoapBox Productions and Organizing, 501(c)3Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Site | Linktree | Support