Now and Men

Durham University Centre for Research into Violence and Abuse

What's it like to be a man in the 21st century? How are feminist issues relevant to men and boys? These questions are being discussed more than ever. Our monthly podcast delves into these issues with experts such as practitioners, activists and academics. In each episode, you’ll hear in-depth conversations about masculinity, gender equality, and the lives of men and boys, with topics ranging from preventing violence against women, to promoting active fatherhood, to supporting men's health. The podcast is created and hosted by Dr Stephen Burrell, Sandy Ruxton and Professor Nicole Westmarland, who are researchers from the Centre for Research into Violence and Abuse (CRiVA), in the Department of Sociology at Durham University in the UK. If you would like to give us your feedback, suggest a guest, or have a question you'd like us to discuss in a future episode, get in touch with us at nowandmen@gmail.com. read less

Prof Lucy Delap - Exploring the History of Feminism and Men’s Engagement with It
18-01-2023
Prof Lucy Delap - Exploring the History of Feminism and Men’s Engagement with It
What can a historical and global perspective teach us about feminism and gender relations? How have men engaged with women's movements over the course of their history in the UK and beyond? And how have anti-sexist men dealt with the challenging questions feminists raise about our emotional and sexual lives within patriarchy? These are some of the questions Professor Lucy Delap has explored in her fascinating research.Please note that this conversation features some discussion of sexual violence, especially between minutes 32 and 39.Lucy is a Professor in Modern British and Gender History at the University of Cambridge, where she is a Fellow of Murray Edwards College. Her research has principally focused on the history of feminism, and in 2020 she published the book ‘Feminisms: A Global History’. Lucy has also worked extensively in labour history, with a focus on the intersections of gender, class and disability. She helped create the ‘Unbecoming Men’ and ‘The Business of Women’s Words’ oral history collections at the British Library. She and colleagues were awarded the Royal Historical Society Public History Prize in 2018 for their work on child sexual abuse. Find out more about her work here: https://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/people/prof-lucy-delap, and follow her on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/suff66.In this episode of Now and Men we explore the following topics: What a historical perspective brings to our understanding of feminism, gender, and masculinitiesHow we can study the history of people’s intimate lives and the ‘private sphere’What led Lucy to become involved in studying gender, feminist history, and men’s responses to itLucy’s research on men who became involved in anti-sexist activism in the UK in the wake of the Women’s Liberation Movement of the 1970s/80s Why the nature of men’s pro-feminist political organising has changed over timeHow and why the ‘men’s movement’ splintered off into different directions (e.g. mythopoetic and ‘men’s rights’ activism)Why issues of emotion, such as guilt and shame, are so important in understanding men’s engagements with feminismMen reflecting on and reconfiguring their ‘sex lives’ in response to feminist activism against sexual violenceThe value of adopting a global perspective on feminist movementsLucy reads from her book ‘Feminisms’ about the work of Nigerian feminist activist Funmilayo Ransome-KutiFurther reading:Lucy’s book, ‘Feminisms: A Global History’ (Penguin, 2020) - https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/305361/feminisms-by-delap-lucy/9780141985985Information about Lucy’s ‘Unbecoming Men’ British Library project - https://www.bl.uk/womens-rights/articles/male-allies and https://www.bl.uk/sisterhood/articles/mens-reponses-to-womens-liberationLucy’s article, ‘Rethinking rapes: Men’s sex lives and feminist critiques’ in Contemporary British History (2022) - https://doi.org/10.1080/13619462.2022.2051489Lucy’s article ‘Feminism, masculinities and emotional politics in the late twentieth century’ in Cultural and Social History (2018) -
Dan Guinness (Beyond Equality) - Working with Men and Boys for Gender Equality
08-12-2022
Dan Guinness (Beyond Equality) - Working with Men and Boys for Gender Equality
For over 10 years, Beyond Equality have been engaging with young men in the UK to give them a chance to reflect on who they want to be, and how they can help create safer and more inclusive communities. This was originally through two different organisations: the Good Lad Initiative in universities and Great Men in schools. Since then they have become Beyond Equality, and now work with men and boys in a range of different settings and communities across the UK. Dan Guinness, the Managing Director, was one of the founders - he talks to us about the journey the organisation has been on, and what they have learnt about how to engage men and boys in transformative conversations about issues such as gender equality, relationships, violence against women, and mental health.Dan has an academic background, holding a PhD in Cultural Anthropology from the University of Oxford. He discusses with us some of the fascinating findings from his research on the links between sport, masculinity, global economic inequalities and neo-liberalism, and how this is embodied in the current Qatar 2022 men’s football World Cup. In addition, he explores the possibilities for healthy and inclusive environments to be created within sport, and his own powerful story of how he came to be involved in gender equality work.  You can find out more about Beyond Equality at: https://www.beyondequality.orgTwitter: https://twitter.com/beyond_equalityInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/beyond_equality/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/beyondequality1Follow Dan on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/danguinness/We cover the following topics in this episode: Dan’s personal journey of getting involved in issues of gender equality, masculinity and violence preventionThe extent to which egalitarian, non-violent cultures can be created in sportHow the rise of neoliberalism since the 1980s together with ‘breadwinner’ expectations have pressured young men in the Global South to become involved in professional sportHow Beyond Equality started and has changed over time, and the work it’s doing nowThe importance of good quality facilitation in work with men and boysHow Beyond Equality evaluate the impact of their work Future plans, including a new project with Movember about men’s mental health and collective resilience (more info: https://www.beyondequality.org/blog-posts/announcement-collective-resilience-in-community-settings-project-funded-by-movember) How debates in the UK about masculinity and violence against women have shifted in recent years, and what still needs to change at the policy levelMore information:You can access much of Dan’s research here: https://www.researchgate.net/scientific-contributions/Daniel-Guinness-2126813915Besnier, N., Calabrò, D.G. and Guinness, D. (eds) (2021) Sport, Migration, and Gender in the Neoliberal Age. Abingdon: Routledge.
Gary Barker (Equimundo) - Promoting Nurturing, Non-Violent Masculinity in Times of Political Upheaval
07-11-2022
Gary Barker (Equimundo) - Promoting Nurturing, Non-Violent Masculinity in Times of Political Upheaval
Gary Barker has been a trailblazer in the field of men and masculinities for over thirty years. He is the co-founder and CEO of Equimundo (formerly known as Promundo-US and Instituto Promundo), which does a wide range of innovative work and research with men and boys for gender justice across the globe. We explore his own personal story of how he came to be involved in efforts against violence and for gender equality, and how his own ‘journey’ overlaps with the development of the organisations he has led. As well as hearing from Gary about some of the exciting current elements of this work, we discuss the political turbulence in the United States (where he is based) and Brazil (where he has lived for over fifteen years) in the midst of elections in the two countries. Gary also shares with us his experience of writing fiction, and the conversation ends with him reading a passage from his novel ‘The Museum of Lost Love’.Find out more about Equimundo and follow them on social media via https://equimundo.orgOn 8th November 2022 the Global Boyhood Initiative launched a report called ‘The State of UK Boys’ - read it here: https://boyhoodinitiative.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/11/State-of-UK-Boys-Long-Report.pdf (pdf)Watch the launch event: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efxq6M9ESAMFind out more about Gary’s fiction writing: https://garytbarker.comWe discuss the following topics in the episode:How Gary became involved in working on issues of masculinity, violence and gender equality in the first placeGary’s PhD in Developmental Psychology, which researched young men’s experiences of growing up in societies with high levels of violence, and led to the book ‘Dying to be Men’ (more info:https://www.routledge.com/Dying-to-be-Men-Youth-Masculinity-and-Social-Exclusion/Barker/p/book/9780415337755#)The history of Equimundo, and how Gary’s personal story maps onto thatThe International Men and Gender Equality Survey (IMAGES) survey and generational shifts that can be observed from itThe Global Boyhood Initiative – a collaboration with the Kering Foundation, Gillette, Plan International, and Meghan Markle (the Duchess of Sussex) and her new podcast ArchetypesCaring masculinities, the MenCare global fatherhood campaign, and why caregiving is such an important part of engaging with men and boys The political turmoil in the United States surrounding the midterm elections - from the attack on Capitol Hill, to the rolling back of abortion rights, to the ever-increasing toll of gun violenceConnections with the masculinist right-wing populism of the Bolsonaro government in BrazilThe four fiction books Gary has written and how they connect to his other workGary reads out and reflects on a passage from his novel ‘The Museum of Lost Love’ (2019), which is influenced by a real museum, the Museum of Broken Relationships in Zagreb (more info: https://www.worldeditions.org/product/the-museum-of-lost-love/) More information:The Global Boyhood Initiative:
Sandy Ruxton and Stephen Burrell Talking to Yaz Brien - Now and Men: One Year On
21-10-2022
Sandy Ruxton and Stephen Burrell Talking to Yaz Brien - Now and Men: One Year On
In this special 20th episode, Sandy and Stephen reflect on the year since we started Now and Men, and our experience of running the podcast so far. The episode was recorded live at a workshop at a conference called 'Boys at the Crossroads – Insights and Innovations in Young Masculinities', organised by Bristol Young Men’s Network in the UK on 14th October 2022. We discuss why we set the podcast up in the first place, what it has achieved thus far, and the role that podcasts and other media can play in engaging with men and boys about gender equality and influencing constructions of masculinity. In the second half of the episode, we also respond to a range of questions from the workshop participants.The conversation was facilitated by Yaz Brien, who’s involved in Bristol Young Men’s Network, and has worked across the frontlines of homelessness, mental health, drug and alcohol recovery and domestic abuse, as well as on community reuse and nature-based projects. They’ve also been involved in grassroots organising and activism across multiple continents, including in worker, housing and community cooperatives. Many thanks to Yaz and the workshop participants for their brilliant contributions! If you would like to put a question or comment to us to discuss in a future episode, do contact us at nowandmen@gmail.com. Yaz is involved in the Transition Network: https://transitionnetwork.org/people/yaz-brien/, and has previously been a presenter on Ujima Radio, Bristol's Black-led community radio station: https://www.ujimaradio.comFind out more about Bristol Young Men's Network: https://www.facebook.com/BristolYMN/. In the episode we also mention talks at the conference by Lewis Wedlock: https://www.lewiswedlock.com, and Nate Eisenstadt: https://research-information.bris.ac.uk/en/persons/nathan-eisenstadt We discuss the following topics:Why we set up Now and MenWhat we wanted to achieve with the podcast, and how successful it's been so farThe response we've received, and what we know about Now and Men's audienceWhat's particularly excited us from the guests we've spoken to far, in relation to the conference theme of young masculinitiesHow to have conversations about masculinity without creating further polarisationWhat the role of feminism is in the podcastHow podcasts differ from other mediums and forms of engagementWhat we've learnt from the process and how it's changed usAdvice for others looking to start a podcastWho we have in our mind's eye when creating the podcastWith the following questions from participants:How skills from academia can help with setting up a podcastHow universities don't always provide welcoming environments for disadvantaged studentsConnections between the diversity of our guestsHow to deal with the limitations of what a podcast can achieveShould we strive for 'healthy masculinity', or seek to move away from it altogether?Difficulties with challenging gender stereotypes as parentsHow a historical perspective can help us understand how gender is constructed
Dr Jade Levell - Boys, Domestic Abuse and Gang Involvement: Eliciting Men’s Stories Through Music
22-09-2022
Dr Jade Levell - Boys, Domestic Abuse and Gang Involvement: Eliciting Men’s Stories Through Music
What impact does domestic abuse have on boys when growing up? Why is it that so many young men who are ‘on-road’ or involved in gangs have experienced domestic abuse in the home as children? If the boundaries between being a ‘perpetrator’ and a ‘victim’ of violence are not always as clear cut as we might think, what implications does this have for trying to prevent violence from happening in the first place? We explore these challenging questions and more with Dr Jade Levell, who has recently written a book on her research entitled ‘Boys, Childhood Domestic Abuse and Gang Involvement: Violence at Home, Violence On-Road’, published by Bristol University Press in June 2022.Jade is a Senior Lecturer in Criminology and Gender Violence at the University of Bristol, and is part of the Gender and Violence Research Centre there. Prior to her research career she was based for over ten years in organisations working to end gender-based violence, including a refuge for women and children, a rape crisis centre, and other projects supporting survivors.Find out more about Jade’s work at https://jadelevell.com. Follow her on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JadeLevell, and LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-jade-levell-88099830/. Buy her book: https://bristoluniversitypress.co.uk/boys-childhood-domestic-abuse-and-gang-involvementWe cover the following topics in the episode: The impacts domestic abuse has on boysWhat childhood domestic abuse and gang involvement have to do with each otherWhat Raewyn Connell’s concept of ‘protest masculinity’ means and how it was relevant in Jade’s researchWhy and how Jade uses ‘music elicitation’ in her workWhy when talking about serious youth violence, we rarely think about genderThe implications of Jade’s research for policy and practice on preventing violenceThe ‘cycle of violence’ theoryThe police killing of Chris Kaba and the impacts of stereotypes about young Black menWhy Jade decided to carry out research on domestic abuse and boys and men in the first placeResearching these issues as a parentWhat effective work with domestic abuse perpetrators looks likeThree songs which help to tell Jade’s own life storyFurther reading:Piece by Jade for Transforming Society, ‘Invisible child victims of DVA become hyper-visible in gangs’ - https://www.transformingsociety.co.uk/2022/06/13/invisible-child-victims-of-dva-become-hyper-visible-in-gangs/Summary of policy recommendations from Jade’s book - https://www.transformingsociety.co.uk/2022/06/13/policy-briefing-boys-childhood-domestic-abuse-and-gang-involvement/Read more about Jade’s music elicitation method in the journal Sociological Review - https://thesociologicalreview.org/magazine/november-2021/methods-and-methodology/music-elicitation/Read more about Jade’s research on work with perpetrators of domestic abuse in the Journal
Sebastián Molano (Oxfam America) – Men at Work, Men at Home: Advancing Feminist Social Change
31-08-2022
Sebastián Molano (Oxfam America) – Men at Work, Men at Home: Advancing Feminist Social Change
How can we engage with men in the workplace about gender equality and masculinity? Sebastián Molano deals with this question on a day-to-day basis at Oxfam America, where he has facilitated a regular ‘men-identified’ group for the last 4.5 years, discussing men’s role in relation to gender justice issues such as privilege, accountability, and decolonisation. The group was established in part in response to sexual misconduct and power abuses by Oxfam staff which were uncovered in Haiti and other countries in 2017 and 2018.Sebastián has been working at Oxfam America for over 5 years, and now leads their efforts to translate intersectional feminism commitments into practice. He has over 16 years of experience in the international development field, working in the US, Latin America and the Caribbean. Sebastián also discusses the Defying Gender Roles initiative he set up, navigating the challenges of fatherhood in a patriarchal society, and how workplaces should do more to encourage caregiving. Originally from Colombia and now living in Boston, we ask Sebastián about responses to the overturning of the landmark 1973 Roe vs Wade abortion rights ruling in the US. Our conversation concludes by exploring the implications of Colombia recently electing its first ever left-wing president, and Sebastián’s experience of growing up in a society riven by conflict.You can follow Sebastián on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sebastianmolano/ and Twitter: @JuanseMolano. Find out more about Oxfam America: https://www.oxfamamerica.org. Read about the Defying Gender Roles project: https://www.defyingenderoles.org, and follow it on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/defyingenderoles/, and Twitter: https://twitter.com/DefygenderolesWe cover the following topics in this episode:Sebastián’s reflections on 4 years of fatherhood and trying to be a ‘feminist dad’Men’s experiences of parenting, our relationships with our own fathers, and with patriarchyThe men-identified group Sebastián facilitates at Oxfam AmericaKey lessons and advice about running a group discussing masculinity in the workplaceAddressing the loneliness and lack of connection many men feelChanging the culture at Oxfam after cases of sexual misconduct in Haiti and other countriesPromoting caregiving among men in the workplaceAttacks on abortion rights in the USThe recent election results in Colombia and what it means for gender equalityWhy Sebastián set up Defying Gender RolesFurther resources relevant to the episode:Sebastián’s piece, ‘How to become a feminist dad: Four years later’ - https://www.defyingenderoles.org/master-in-love/2022/8/5/how-to-become-a-feminist-dad-four-years-laterbell hooks (2004) ‘The Will to Change: Men, Masculinity, and Love’ - https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/The-Will-to-Change/bell-hooks/9780743456081David Spiegelhalter, ‘I’ve been meeting with the same group of men for 36...
Dan Boyden (Safe Ground) - Reimagining Masculinities in the Prison System
04-08-2022
Dan Boyden (Safe Ground) - Reimagining Masculinities in the Prison System
Prisons can be hyper-masculine, harsh, hierarchical environments where there is a lot of pressure to be tough, never show weakness or emotion, and be prepared to use violence in order to survive. But is it possible to work with men in these spaces to unpack the rigid, restrictive expectations of masculinity that boys and men learn from wider society – and which might have played a part in why they are in prison in the first place? We talk to Dan Boyden, lead facilitator on the ‘Man Up’, ‘Family Man’ and ‘Fathers Inside’ programmes run by the UK charity Safe Ground, about how they do this in their work. We discuss how, in order to reduce crime, perhaps we need to not only work with individual men in prison, but also change prison cultures and the criminal justice system more broadly.Safe Ground design and deliver arts-based programmes for people in prison and the community. Find out more (pdf): http://www.safeground.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/Safe-Ground-A-Vision.pdf. Follow them on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Safe_Ground and Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/safe_ground/Dan Boyden is also the director of an organisation called The Change Collective, which brings together creative practitioners seeking to use the arts as a tool for social change: https://www.thechangecollective.com. Follow him on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dan-boyden-4517542b/. He has given a TED Talk on ‘Creativity and the Alchemy of Groups’: https://www.ted.com/talks/dan_boyden_creativity_the_alchemy_of_groupsWe cover the following topics in this episode:What the ‘Man Up’, ‘Family Man’ and 'Fathers Inside' programmes are about, and what Safe Ground’s work with men in prisons involvesChallenges involved in doing group work with men in prisonHow the prisons themselves interact with Safe Ground’s workShifts in penal policy in the UK towards more punitive responsesWhy Dan and Safe Ground use arts-based methodsEngaging with men in prison about fatherhoodWhat impacts the work has on the men who take partThe need for more engagement with men and boys across society about masculine norms and expectationsHow Dan got involved in working on masculinity issues, and the impact the work has on himFurther reading:‘Treatment of UK prisoners during Covid meets UN definition of torture’ (The Guardian): https://www.theguardian.com/society/2022/jul/20/treatment-of-uk-prisoners-during-covid-meets-un-definition-of-tortureMaslow’s hierarchy of needs: https://www.simplypsychology.org/maslow.htmlTheatre of the Oppressed: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theatre_of_the_Oppressed, and its founder, Augusto Boal:
Dr Stacey Pope - Building Gender Equality in Football
06-07-2022
Dr Stacey Pope - Building Gender Equality in Football
The surging interest in Euro 2022, the Women’s European Championships taking place in England this summer, provides more evidence that we are in a ‘new age’ when it comes to coverage of women’s football. It highlights that much has been achieved in building gender equality in soccer in the UK and beyond. However, numerous recent issues, from questionable stadium choices to high-profile cases of sexual and domestic violence by male players, demonstrate there is still a long way to go, particularly in getting more men to become allies to women and speak out against sexism and misogyny at all levels in the game. In this episode of Now and Men, we talk to Dr Stacey Pope about her extensive research in this area – on issues from attitudes among male fans, to experiences of women in football – which gives vital insights into what the problems are and how things can be changed. Stacey is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences at Durham University. She studies issues of gender, sport and inequality and is a leading figure in research into women sports fans. She has written a book, ‘The Feminization of Sports Fandom: A Sociological Study’, published by Routledge in 2017: https://www.routledge.com/The-Feminization-of-Sports-Fandom-A-Sociological-Study/Pope/p/book/9780367233006Follow Stacey on Twitter: https://twitter.com/StaceyPope20 or LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stacey-pope-104a2a57/. Read more about her work: https://www.durham.ac.uk/staff/stacey-pope/.We discuss the following topics in the episode:Where Euro 2022 fits in the history of women’s football in EnglandWhat the Women’s Euros tell us about gender equality in the game todayTackling violence against women in footballStacey’s research on attitudes among male fans towards women’s footballProgressive shifts in masculinities in footballChallenging stereotypes about football fans and working-class masculinitiesStacey’s research on the history of female football fandomExperiences of women football fans todayWhere Stacey’s own interests in football come fromHow to build gender equality in the game, including examples from other countriesHow men in football can be allies to womenWho will win the Euros!Further reading:Just after we recorded the episode, an exciting new campaign was launched by the phone company EE called #HopeUnited #NotHerProblem, featuring several high-profile men and women players challenging sexist and misogynistic abuse online – https://www.eehopeunited.co.ukA recent piece by Stacey in The Conversation – ‘Why football needs a gender revolution’ – https://theconversation.com/why-football-needs-a-gender-revolution-182394Stacey’s research on ‘a new age’ of media coverage of women’s sport –  https://doi.org/10.1177/0038038518797505Stacey’s research on men’s attitudes towards women’s football:
Sé Franklin - Older Men, Masculinities in Ireland, and ‘Inner Work’
26-05-2022
Sé Franklin - Older Men, Masculinities in Ireland, and ‘Inner Work’
Many older men, especially those who are socially isolated, face significant challenges – from physical ill-health, to loneliness, to marginalisation and poverty. These struggles can be compounded by the ‘hard shell’ of masculinity, learnt young and persisting through the life-course, which can leave some older men feeling a loss of a sense of purpose and potency, and prevent them from opening up about their vulnerabilities or the need for connection and support. Yet growing older can also provide opportunities for reflection, taking life in new directions, and leaving behind restrictive gendered expectations. In this episode of Now and Men, we have a moving conversation with Sé Franklin about the work he does with older men in Ireland on these issues – as well as the profound impact of doing ‘inner work’ guided by feminist principles. We consider some of the significant social change which has been taking place in Ireland – from divorce reform, to marriage equality, and abortion rights – and what it tells us about gender in Irish society today. The episode ends with Sé reading out a piece he has written on being an older man.Sé Franklin has been ‘sitting with men in circles’ since 1997. He has worked with the Men's Development Network and other community-based organisations for many years. He has been part of the MenEngage Europe Network since its inception. He is a husband, father and grand-father, and lives in rural County Wexford in the South-East of the Republic of Ireland.In this episode we cover the following topics:The group work Sé does with older men in IrelandThe role of masculinity in this work and in older men’s livesThe positive effects engaging with older men can haveHaving a men’s health strategy in IrelandThe personal impacts that doing this work hasHow poetry can be used in engaging with menThe value of doing inner workStopping men’s violence against women in Ireland after the killing of Ashling MurphyThe implications of ongoing social change in Ireland around divorce law reform, same-sex marriage and abortionSé’s reading of his piece, ‘An Old Man’s Masculinities’Links:Men’s Development Network - https://mensnetwork.ieWe talk to Colm Kelly Ryan, Head of Programmes and Advocacy at the Men's Development Network, in episode 6, 'Men Marching Against Violence Against women' - https://now-and-men.captivate.fm/episode/seville-marchWhite Ribbon Ireland - https://mensnetwork.ie/whiteribbon/  MenEngage Europe - https://menengage.org/region/europe/Explainers:Irish Men’s Sheds Association - https://menssheds.ie‘Calls for action on gender-based violence after Ashling Murphy killing’ (The Guardian) - https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/jan/17/calls-for-action-on-gender-based-violence-after-ashling-murphy-killing-ireland‘Huge Republic of Ireland vote for gay marriage’ (BBC News) - https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-32858501‘Ireland votes by landslide to legalise abortion’ (The Guardian) -
Luis Lineo - Masculinity, the War in Ukraine, and Refugees: Swedish Responses
28-04-2022
Luis Lineo - Masculinity, the War in Ukraine, and Refugees: Swedish Responses
Luis Lineo was born in Ukraine to Chilean parents, and was raised there by a single mother. He moved to Sweden at the age of 12 as a refugee. As an adult, he became involved in work on masculinity, violence, and gender equality. We speak to him about the impact of watching on as his country of birth is invaded, and why masculinity and gender matter in the horrifying war on Ukraine. We also explore issues of inequality, integration, and violence in contemporary Sweden, and why Swedish society is more complicated than the beacon of gender equality it is often perceived to be.Luis is actively involved in Sweden’s Feminist Initiative Party and works at the secretariat for MenEngage Europe (MenEngage is a global network of civil society organisations working with men and boys for gender equality). For over 15 years he has been a journalist and sexuality educator, and helps to run a media house called Fanzingo for young people in a low-income area south of Stockholm. He is an active member of MÄN, a leading organisation in Sweden and Europe working on preventing men’s violence against women and a range of other masculinity issues. He is also a fan of rugby, and used to play for the Swedish national men’s rugby team!We cover the following topics in the episode:The impact of the war on Luis and his friends and familyLuis’s life growing up in Ukraine – and what led him to move to SwedenLuis’s experience of hosting a Ukrainian refugee family since the war beganWhy a masculinities perspective is so relevant to the war in UkraineRapid changes in Swedish foreign policy – including potentially joining NatoLuis’s experience of being involved in the Feminist Initiative PartyGender equality, gender norms and backlash in Sweden, e.g. around parental leaveRiots against the burning of the Quran in Sweden – and the influence of xenophobia and the far-rightHow Luis first got involved in gender equality workBeing a rugby player, and masculine cultures in rugbyFor more information...Follow Luis on Twitter - https://twitter.com/lucholineoFeminist Initiative Party - https://feministisktinitiativ.se/sprak/english/election-platform/MenEngage Alliance - https://menengage.orgMedia House Fanzingo - https://fanzingo.se/in-english/MÄN - https://mfj.se/enExplainers:Sweden has not yet signed or ratified the UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) - https://www.icanw.org/swedenMalmö: Two women killed after violent attack at Swedish school (BBC) - https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-60830059Swedish parental leave policy (Swedish Institute) - https://sweden.se/life/society/work-life-balanceWomen's Equality Party (UK) - https://womensequality.org.ukSweden riots over Quran burning: What is happening? (Al Jazeera) -
Prof Nicole Westmarland - Men’s Activism to End Violence Against Women and Girls
31-03-2022
Prof Nicole Westmarland - Men’s Activism to End Violence Against Women and Girls
Some men are playing an active part in speaking out against violence towards women – but not nearly enough. So how do those men who are involved in anti-violence activism come to that position, and what can we learn from their experiences? March 2022 marks one year since Sarah Everard was murdered by a serving police officer, and given the anger this precipitated about the continued prevalence of violence against women and girls in the UK, this is a vital moment to consider what has changed since then, and what change remains needed – especially regarding men’s role in the solution. To explore these issues further, we speak to Professor of Criminology Nicole Westmarland. Nicole is the Director of Durham University’s Centre for Research into Violence and Abuse (http://www.dur.ac.uk/criva), and is internationally recognised for her research in this area. Together with colleagues in Sweden and Spain, Nicole and Now and Men hosts Sandy and Stephen wrote a book entitled ‘Men’s Activism to End Violence Against Women’, published by Policy Press in 2021.The book is available to buy, or for free as an open access e-book, here: https://policy.bristoluniversitypress.co.uk/mens-activism-to-end-violence-against-women. We have also written two pieces for The Conversation UK, ‘How men can be allies to women right now’: https://theconversation.com/how-men-can-be-allies-to-women-right-now-157126 and ‘Sarah Everard, police culture and the ‘masculinised’ workplaces we can all help change’: https://theconversation.com/sarah-everard-police-culture-and-the-masculinised-workplaces-we-can-all-help-change-169774. In addition, we have produced a toolkit for the UK Government Equalities Office on ‘Engaging with men and boys about masculine gender norms’: http://dur.ac.uk/criva/geotoolkit/Nicole has also written a number of other books, including 'Violence Against Women - Criminological Perspectives on Men's Violences' (Routledge, 2015): https://www.routledge.com/Violence-against-Women-Criminological-perspectives-on-mens-violences/Westmarland/p/book/9781843923985 and ‘Researching Gender, Violence and Abuse’ (Routledge, 2019): https://www.routledge.com/Researching-Gender-Violence-and-Abuse-Theory-Methods-Action/Westmarland-Bows/p/book/9781138641266. She has co-led one of the biggest pieces of research about work with perpetrators of domestic abuse in the UK, Project Mirabal: https://projectmirabal.co.uk. You can find out more about Nicole's work here: https://www.durham.ac.uk/staff/nicole-westmarland/, and follow her on Twitter at https://twitter.com/Nwestmarland.We cover the following topics in this episode:What has changed...
Prof Raewyn Connell - Making Sense of Men and Masculinities in the 21st Century
10-03-2022
Prof Raewyn Connell - Making Sense of Men and Masculinities in the 21st Century
There is probably no one who has had as big an impact on understandings of men and masculinities as Professor Raewyn Connell. She is one of the founders of this field of research, and has written what is perhaps its key text, the 1995 book ‘Masculinities’, in which she developed her hugely influential concept of hegemonic masculinity. Raewyn has also written and researched on a range of other issues in addition to gender and sexuality, from ‘Southern Theory’, to class, neoliberalism, education, and the politics of intellectual life. Now Professor Emerita at the University of Sydney, she recently received the International Sociological Association's Award for Excellence in Research and Practice, in recognition of her enormous contribution to social science.It was therefore a huge privilege to talk to Raewyn for this episode of Now and Men. We discuss her views on everything from Russia’s horrifying war on Ukraine, to the Covid-19 pandemic, to some of her earliest research with young men and its relevance to today, to the environmental movement, to her own life history and the experiences of trans women (and other trans groups). Raewyn is also a published poet, and she kindly shares one of her poems with us at the end of the episode.You can find out much more about the wealth of work Raewyn has done on her personal website, http://www.raewynconnell.net. Her most recent book is called ‘The Good University: What Universities Actually Do and Why It’s Time for Radical Change’, which was published by Zed Books in 2019: https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/good-university-9781786995407/. She also recently wrote an article about this topic for The Conversation: https://theconversation.com/remaking-universities-notes-from-the-sidelines-of-catastrophe-175920Explainers:The 2nd edition of the book ‘Masculinities’ was published in 2005 by Routledge: https://www.routledge.com/Masculinities/Connell/p/book/9781741145199The 4th edition of the book ‘Gender: In World Perspective’ was published by Polity in 2020: https://www.politybooks.com/bookdetail?book_slug=gender-in-world-perspective-4th-edition--9781509538997The book ‘Southern Theory: Social Science and the Global Dynamics of Knowledge’ was published by Polity in 2007: https://www.politybooks.com/bookdetail?book_slug=southern-theory-social-science-and-the-global-dynamics-of-knowledge--9780745642482The book ‘Making the Difference: Schools, Families and Social Division’, was published by Routledge in 1982: https://www.routledge.com/Making-the-Difference-Schools-families-and-social-division/Connell/p/book/9780868611327. Raewyn also wrote an article about it in 2010 – ‘Making the Difference, Then and Now’: https://doi.org/10.1080/0159630022000029812Raewyn wrote an article about the...
Prof Paul Higate - Militarism and Military Masculinities: Why Do They Matter?
11-02-2022
Prof Paul Higate - Militarism and Military Masculinities: Why Do They Matter?
With the build-up of Russian troops on the borders of Ukraine, and the macho posturing of political leaders, military masculinities remain highly influential. But what does this concept mean, and is it something we should be concerned about? How are masculinities constructed within the armed forces? Is UK society becoming increasingly influenced by militarism? We explore these questions and much more with Professor Paul Higate.Paul is Professor in Security and Conflict at the University of Bath, in the Department of Politics, Languages & International Studies. He is an advisory editor for the journal Men & Masculinities, and on the editorial board for the journal Critical Military Studies. He was previously in the Royal Air Force for 8 years as a non-commissioned officer, having enlisted when he was 17.Paul’s research has focused on the links between service in the British army and homelessness, the experience of armed service leavers more broadly, peacekeepers and sexual exploitation, security and host populations hosting peacekeeping operations, and Private Military Security Companies and masculinity. In 2003 he edited the book ‘Military Masculinities: Identity and the State’ (Praeger). You can read more about Paul’s work here: https://researchportal.bath.ac.uk/en/persons/paul-higate, and find him on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/paul-higate-956876b/.We cover the following topics in this episode:What 'military masculinities' are The values celebrated within military masculinityHow the military is viewed in the UK Misogyny, homophobia, extremism in service subculturesParallels between military culture and other masculinised institutionsViolence against women in the military'Feminisation' of the military and more inclusionary approaches to race, sexuality, religionPaul’s experience in the RAF and the impact it had on himPaul’s PhD research on homelessness among veteransEarly recruitment of young people in the UKMilitarism in Britain: Troops to Teachers, cadet forces, services visibilityImpacts of war toys and video gamesSymbolism of the poppyWhat the military might look like in the futureSome of Paul’s work:Lecture on ‘Beyond the Myth of the Apolitical Actor: The Case of the British Military’: https://youtu.be/1DoOOp5gb2ELecture on ‘Interrogating British Armed Forces Recruiting in Contemporary Times’: https://youtu.be/_G9DMzuQ9XIArticle for Rethinking Security on ‘Racial Hierarchies and the War on Terror’ (2021): https://rethinkingsecurity.org.uk/2021/10/12/racial-hierarchies/Article for The Conversation UK on ‘Colour, gender, religion: There’s more than political correctness to the new British Army recruitment campaign’ (2018): https://theconversation.com/colour-gender-religion-theres-more-than-political-correctness-to-the-new-british-army-recruitment-campaign-90199Co-edited book on ‘Private Security in Africa: From the Global Assemblage to the Everyday’ (2017, Zed Books):
Prof Jason Arday - Being Young, Black and Male: Challenging the Dominant Discourse
26-01-2022
Prof Jason Arday - Being Young, Black and Male: Challenging the Dominant Discourse
How do stereotypes about Black masculinity influence the lives and aspirations of Black men and boys today? What impacts do they have on individuals and institutions - and how are people of colour challenging such prejudices? How should white people - and especially white men - respond, and what should they do to support the struggle against racism? We explore these questions and much more with Professor Jason Arday, who is based in Durham University’s Department of Sociology like Stephen and Sandy, and is about to move to the School of Education at the University of Glasgow.Jason is a Trustee of the Runnymede Trust, the UK’s leading Race Equality Thinktank, and the British Sociological Association. He also sits on the Centre for Labour and Social Studies (CLASS) National Advisory Panel and the NHS Race and Health Observatory Academic Reference Group, as well as being a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (RSA). He holds Visiting Fellowships at several institutions including Ohio State University.You can find out more about Jason’s work at https://www.durham.ac.uk/staff/jason-a-arday/. He has a book coming out soon through Palgrave Macmillan called ‘Being Young, Black and Male: Challenging the Dominant Discourse’. He has written the book ‘Cool Britannia and Multi-Ethnic Britain: Uncorking the Champagne Supernova’ (Routledge, 2019): https://www.routledge.com/Cool-Britannia-and-Multi-Ethnic-Britain-Uncorking-the-Champagne-Supernova/Arday/p/book/9781138217409. Jason and Prof Heidi Mirza have co-edited the book ‘Dismantling Race in Higher Education: Racism, Whiteness and Decolonising the Academy’ (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018): https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-319-60261-5We cover the following topics in this episode:The ‘Colston Four’ verdict and removing statues of colonial figuresResponses to the Black Lives Matter movement in the UKHow Black masculinities are viewed, and the effects this hasStruggles around ‘talking to white people about race’Resisting racist stereotypes, and Jason’s upcoming book ‘Being Young, Black and Male: Challenging the dominant discourse’How Jason got involved in researching these issuesJason’s experience of growing up and dealing with disability as a Black manThe role of the education system in tackling race inequalityHow Covid-19 has interacted with structural racism in the UKPrinciples for white people in becoming genuine allies Music which reflects the challenges Jason has facedResources of interest:Reni Eddo-Lodge’s book ‘Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race’ (Bloomsbury, 2018): https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/why-im-no-longer-talking-to-white-people-about-race-9781408870587/Lemn Sissay’s book ‘My Name Is Why’ (Canongate, 2019): https://www.waterstones.com/book/my-name-is-why/lemn-sissay/9781786892362Guardian documentary ‘The Circle’, directed by Lanre Malaolu, about masculinity, racism and brotherhood on a Hackney estate (2020):
Olivia Dickinson - Let Toys Be Toys: Gender Stereotypes and Boys
20-12-2021
Olivia Dickinson - Let Toys Be Toys: Gender Stereotypes and Boys
At Christmas time, many of us are buying toys for the children in our lives. But do toys, and the way they are promoted, play a significant role in reinforcing gender stereotypes from a young age? What impact does it have on boys that they are frequently encouraged to play with vehicles, construction toys, weapons – but rarely dolls, domestic toys, fashion or crafts? In this Christmas Special episode of Now and Men, we explore these issues with Olivia Dickinson from the UK campaign Let Toys Be Toys. We discuss new research Let Toys Be Toys have just published, showing that whilst progress is being made, gender stereotypes remain widespread in TV toy advertising, with adverts featuring girls often focusing on themes of fashion, beauty, ‘be nice’ and consumerism, and adverts featuring boys often focusing on action and conflict. Read more about the research here: https://lettoysbetoys.org.uk/tvads2021/. Let Toys Be Toys have 'Just 4 Asks' for manufacturers, retailers and now advertisers: https://www.lettoysbetoys.org.uk/just4asks/. They have also created some videos for advertisers: https://www.lettoysbetoys.org.uk/toyads-just4asks/Olivia has 20 years’ experiences of working in children’s media across Amazon, the BBC, Nickelodeon and Sky Kids. She provides training for school staff and trainee teachers, as well as consulting for children's TV and digital companies on equality issues, and is a member of the executive group responsible for diversity and inclusion at The Children’s Media Foundation. You can find out more and get involved in Let Toys Be Toys at https://lettoysbetoys.org.uk. Follow Olivia on Twitter at https://twitter.com/OlivaceousD, and on LinkedIn at https://linkedin.com/in/oliviadickinson/. She has also been involved in the charity Lifting Limits, who you can find out more about at: https://liftinglimits.org.uk. Read their pilot evaluation here: https://liftinglimits.org.uk/pilot-evaluation/In the episode we cover the following topics:How gender stereotypes are reinforced through toys and other parts of children’s lives (e.g. media, advertising, publishing, clothes) and why this is harmfulWhat impact this has on boys and on constructions of masculinityWays in which children resist these influencesHow gender stereotypes in childhood have changed (and in some cases become more significant) over timeAchievements of the Let Toys Be Toys campaignThe role that toy companies are playing and how they could do betterHow gendered marketing contributes to more consumption and more environmental damageThe work of Lifting Limits and how schools and educators can help challenge gender stereotypesHow Olivia got involved in campaigning on these issues and how she keeps motivatedAdvice she would give to parents and other adults about how to help children not be held back by gender stereotypesThe following resources were also discussed during the episode…Let Toys Be Toys article on 10 ways to challenge gender stereotypes in the classroom:
Prof Bob Pease - Masculinities, Climate Change, and Men’s Relationships with Nature
08-12-2021
Prof Bob Pease - Masculinities, Climate Change, and Men’s Relationships with Nature
What do men, gender inequality and the climate crisis have to do with each other? What role might masculinities be playing in contributing to environmental destruction? In the wake of COP26, hear Professor Bob Pease discuss why men need to recreate our relationships with nature in order to tackle global heating in this episode of Now and Men. Bob is an Adjunct Professor in the Institute for Social Change at the University of Tasmania in Australia, and an Honorary Professor in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at Deakin University. He is a pro-feminist academic and activist with a background in critical social work, who has been involved in research and campaigning around ending men's violence against women for several decades, and has recently been exploring the gendered dynamics of natural disasters and climate change.The episode covers the following topics…Bob’s reflections on the COP26 UN Climate Conference in Glasgow.Why studying men and masculinities can help us to understand the climate and ecological crises, and how a pro-feminist lens offers solutions for tackling them.How masculinities can affect and hinder men’s emotional responses to natural disasters, such as the bushfires in Australia.Bob’s reflections on his participation in anti-sexist activism and research since the 1970’s, and how he came to be involved in the first place.His advice for men interested in getting involved in pro-feminist, anti-violence work today.Why men should want to work to undo male privilege.What Bob does to maintain a sense of hope in the work he does.You can find out more about Bob’s work here: https://rmdb.research.utas.edu.au/public/rmdb/q/indiv_detail_warp_trans/19205. He has written and edited more than 15 books during his career, the most recent of which include:‘Undoing Privilege: Unearned Advantage and Systemic Injustice in an Unequal World’ – the second edition of which will be published on 16th December 2021 by Bloomsbury: https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/undoing-privilege-9781913441135/‘Post-Anthropocentric Social Work: Critical Posthuman and New Materialist Perspectives’ (Routledge, 2021, co-edited with Prof Vivienne Bozalek): https://www.routledge.com/Post-Anthropocentric-Social-Work-Critical-Posthuman-and-New-Materialist/Bozalek-Pease/p/book/9780367349653‘Facing Patriarchy: From a Violent Gender Order to a Culture of Peace’ (Zed Books, 2019): https://www.bloomsburycollections.com/book/facing-patriarchy-from-a-violent-gender-order-to-a-culture-of-peace/‘Men, Masculinities and Disaster’ (Routledge, 2016, co-edited with Dr Elaine Enarson):https://www.routledge.com/Men-Masculinities-and-Disaster/Enarson-Pease/p/book/9781138324602You can read his article, ‘Recreating Men’s Relationship with Nature: Toward a Profeminist Environmentalism’, in the journal Men and Masculinities here: https://doi.org/10.1177/1097184X18805566
Peter Baker - Improving Men's Health and Wellbeing
23-11-2021
Peter Baker - Improving Men's Health and Wellbeing
How and why has men’s health been so badly impacted by Covid-19? What do masculinities and feminism have to do with men’s health? What are some of the key issues affecting the wellbeing of men and boys in the UK today, and what can we do about it? Find out more in the latest episode of Now and Men, with international men’s health expert Peter Baker. Peter is the Director of the Global Action on Men’s Health network, and for 12 years was the Chief Executive of the Men’s Health Forum in the UK. Until 2020 he was also the Campaign Director for HPV Action, and in 2018 received the Royal Society for Public Health’s award for Outstanding Contribution to Championing the Public’s Health because of his efforts in getting boys vaccinated against HPV (human papillomavirus).Topics covered in this episode include…Why Covid-19 demonstrates the need to engage much more with men and boys about their physical and mental health (for example, regarding vaccinations).Why the male suicide rate does not appear to have increased so far during the pandemic.How Peter got involved in working on men’s health, and the impact of his own experiences of growing up as a boy.Peter’s involvement in anti-sexist activism such as the magazine Achilles Heel, and why feminism has made a vital contribution to men’s health.The effects of pornography on men and boys, and Peter’s involvement in anti-pornography campaigning.The impacts of masculine gender norms and expectations on men’s and boys’ health.The increasing struggles some men and boys are facing around body image.Peter’s campaigning for boys to get vaccinated against the human papillomavirus (HPV).What works, what some of the tensions are, and what policies are needed to improve the health of men and boys. You can find out more about Peter and his work at his website, https://pbmenshealth.co.uk. You can also follow him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/pbmenshealth, and on LinkedIn: http://uk.linkedin.com/in/pbmenshealth/.Other organisations and resources mentioned in the episode…Global Action on Men’s Health: https://gamh.orgUK Men’s Health Forum: https://www.menshealthforum.org.ukHPV Action: http://www.hpvaction.orgBritish Medical Journal (BMJ) piece, ‘Our response to Covid-19 must not be gender blind nor a gender battle’: https://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2021/07/02/our-response-to-covid-19-must-not-be-gender-blind-nor-a-gender-battle/UK Men’s Sheds Association: https://menssheds.org.uk
Men Marching Against Violence Against Women
02-11-2021
Men Marching Against Violence Against Women
What does a men’s march against violence against women look like? What kind of actions are organisations across Europe taking to engage men and boys in building gender equality? We find out in this special episode of Now and Men, recorded in Seville at a demonstration against gender-based violence, which takes place every year on 21st October in cities across Spain. To coincide with this, a MenEngage Europe members’ meeting was also happening in Seville, so we spoke to participants from several different European countries about their experience of the demonstration, the work they do, and why it’s so important for men to transform harmful ideas of masculinity and take action against patriarchal violence.We talk to:Miguel Lázaro - Vice-President of Masculinidades Beta in Spain - https://masculinidadesbeta.org, and member of MenEngage Iberia - https://twitter.com/menengageiberiaAnna Lindqvist - Director of MÄN in Sweden - https://mfj.se/en Colm Kelly Ryan - Head of Programmes at the Men's Development Network in Ireland - https://mensnetwork.ie (Colm has written a report of the demonstration and MenEngage meeting here: https://mensnetwork.ie/menengage/)Joni van de Sand – Global Co-Director of the MenEngage Alliance - http://menengage.orgThe demonstration was covered (in Spanish) by RTVE, the Spanish public broadcasting service, here: https://www.rtve.es/play/videos/telediario-2/manifestacion-sevilla-bajo-lema-hombres-igualdad/6148239/.You can join the MenEngage Europe Facebook Page at: https://www.facebook.com/MenEngageEuropeSandy, Stephen and other colleagues have co-authored a book, ‘Men’s Activism to End Violence Against Women: Voices from Spain, Sweden and the UK’ (Policy Press, 2021), which is available to buy or to read for free as an e-book here: https://policy.bristoluniversitypress.co.uk/mens-activism-to-end-violence-against-womenPlease note that because the podcast was recorded whilst we were at the demonstration, the sound quality is not always perfect, for which we apologise!Thank you to Shkodran Latifi (from SIT, Kosovo - https://sit-ks.org) for the photo.
Dr Fiona Vera-Gray - Men’s Violence against Women, Street Harassment, and Pornography
08-10-2021
Dr Fiona Vera-Gray - Men’s Violence against Women, Street Harassment, and Pornography
What role can men play in ending violence against women and girls? Sarah Everard, Sabina Nessa, Nicole Smallman and Bibaa Henry – and many other women – have been murdered by men in the UK over the last year. This has led to an outpouring of anger about the extent of men’s violence, the pervasiveness of sexism and misogyny that underpins it, and the failure of key institutions to respond effectively. In this episode we talk to Dr Fiona Vera-Gray, Assistant Professor in Durham University’s Department of Sociology, who is an expert on sexual violence, street harassment and pornography, about her research and what needs to change.The episode covers the following topics:Whether the heightened awareness and public debate about men’s violence against women is likely to lead to significant change.The response of the police, the wider criminal justice system, and UK government to calls for them to do more to tackle men’s violence against women and girls.What men need to do to help become part of the solution.Problems that can arise when men do get involved in work to end violence against women.Fiona’s research into the impacts of men’s intrusions and harassment of women in public spaces, and how this constrains their freedoms.Her research on the content of mainstream online pornography.The influences that pornography is having on society, including on ideas of masculinity and male sexuality, and what we should do about it.The impact that feminism and being part of the movement to end violence against women and girls has had on Fiona. You can find out more about Fiona’s work here: https://www.durham.ac.uk/staff/fiona-vera-gray/, and follow her on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/VeraGrayFFiona has recently written an article for the Guardian, ‘If we’re serious about ending violence against women, we need to talk about culture’: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/oct/04/violence-against-women-culture-true-crime-pornography-onscreenYou can buy her 2018 book, ‘The Right Amount of Panic: How women trade freedom for safety in public’ (Policy Press), here: https://policy.bristoluniversitypress.co.uk/the-right-amount-of-panicAnd her 2016 book, ‘Men's Intrusion, Women's Embodiment: A critical analysis of street harassment’, here: https://www.routledge.com/Mens-Intrusion-Womens-Embodiment-A-critical-analysis-of-street-harassment/Vera-Gray/p/book/9781138360327You can read her latest journal article, ‘Sexual violence as a sexual script in mainstream online pornography’ (2021), in the British Journal of Criminology here: https://academic.oup.com/bjc/article/61/5/1243/6208896An article on what men can do to help end violence against women by Stephen, Sandy and Nicole Westmarland, ‘How men can be allies to women right now’, was published in March 2021:
Owen Thomas - Working with Marginalised Young Men
21-09-2021
Owen Thomas - Working with Marginalised Young Men
What’s life like for young Black men in London today – and how has it changed since the 1980s? What can be done to support them, and to open up new ways of being a man? Find out more in this conversation with Owen Thomas, Head of Programmes with Fathers at the charity Future Men, where he has worked for over 15 years. Some of the issues we cover in this episode of Now and Men include:Why Owen was invited to the G7 to talk to the Duchess of Cambridge and Jill Biden about Future Men’s work with fathers.Owen’s experiences of growing up and learning about what it means to be a man in Brixton in the 1980s and 1990s.The struggles and new opportunities around being a father during the pandemic.The work that Future Men do and how they seek to foster new, healthier models of masculinity.The Black Lives Matter movement, and the impacts of racism on Future Men staff and the men and boys they work with.The challenges that young men in London are facing now and in the future, from extreme wealth inequalities, to gentrification, to gang violence - and how young people are creating social change in the face of this.We apologise for the background noise during the first part of the episode – Future Men’s office is near a school and the children were obviously having their break at the same time we were recording!Find out more about the work of Future Men at http://futuremen.org. You can follow them on Twitter at https://twitter.com/FutureMenUK, Facebook at https://facebook.com/FutureMenCharity/, and LinkedIn at https://linkedin.com/company/future-men-charity.Future Men chair the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Fatherhood, which you can read more about at: https://futuremen.org/appg-on-fatherhood/Early on in the episode Owen mentions the uprisings against racism in 1981, 1985 and 1995. These are sometimes described as the Brixton riots, and you can read more about them here: https://theguardian.com/world/2021/apr/11/brixton-riots-40-years-on-a-watershed-moment-for-race-relations and here: https://runnymedetrust.org/histories/index.html  Towards the end of the episode Owen refers to the killing of the former footballer Dalian Atkinson by a police officer, which you can learn more about here: https://theconversation.com/dalian-atkinson-manslaughter-conviction-for-pc-but-justice-for-police-violence-remains-elusive-163457Early on in the episode the following acronyms are used: ILEA (Inner London Education Authority) and GLC (Greater London Council).If you have any questions or comments about this or future episodes of Now and Men, you can contact us at nowandmen@gmail.com.