FUTUREVVORLD: Progress Over Perfection

FUTUREVVORLD

FUTUREVVORLD is an online hub for Earth Friendlier projects. “Progress Over Perfection” is a new audio series that features interviews with critical thinkers and materials experts, deep dives into brand commitments and product releases, and the latest news in the world of fashion, footwear and design. read less
Society & CultureSociety & Culture

Episodes

MNTGE Is Digitizing Vintage Clothing, Rips, Frays, Fades and All
Dec 30 2022
MNTGE Is Digitizing Vintage Clothing, Rips, Frays, Fades and All
On this episode of Progress Over Perfection, we’re joined by Sean Wotherspoon, Nick Adler, and Brennan Russo, the co-founders of MNTGE.Using blockchain technology, state-of-the-art camera systems and world-renowned graphic designers, MNTGE is a digital wearables brand that brings the real-world heritage of vintage apparel to the virtual world.We admit, we're not even sure what we just wrote, so here's how it essentially works. Sean Wotherspoon–owner of secondhand retailer Round Two, frequent adidas collaborator and fashion designer–is a collector of rare and iconic vintage clothing. He has an archive in California filled with over 4,000 pieces, each with their own unique story to tell, many of which no one will ever see, let alone wear. Now, imagine if you could own one of those items, but a digitized version, complete with the same wear and tear, stains and frays, discoloration and texture as the one that lives in the physical world. That’s MNTGE. “There is gonna be a future just like we see in the movies where there is a parallel universe, we're all living in a digital form, we might have secondary jobs...And you're going to need cool clothes to wear. We're just simply solving that problem way ahead of time.”Alongside physical offerings and a full access membership program, MNTGE is bringing the best parts of vintage clothing to the virtual world, encouraging people to become more conscious, community-driven consumers by buying secondhand.“Our only way to meet what is going to be the future of customer demand is putting it through this digital program. We're going to be able to catalog hundreds of thousands of styles on a phone.”“We're looking at this as a cohesive community project, where we want to entertain you, we want to teach you, and we want you to onboard and feel like you are part of a product.”We had the pleasure of sitting down with these three innovators, to talk about their journey, how MNTGE came about, what MNTGE is exactly, and what I can be. <>If you enjoyed this episode, or any of our past episodes, please subscribe, rate us and leave a comment. It would be greatly appreciated.Also, be sure to sign up for our newsletter at futurevvorld.com and follow us on Instagram @futurevvorld.
MycoWorks Is Solving Industry Problems With Mycelium Materials
Dec 21 2022
MycoWorks Is Solving Industry Problems With Mycelium Materials
MycoWorks is a biotechnology company that specializes in the creation of mycelium-based materials. If you’ve visited the digital pages of FUTUREVVORD at all over the past two years, you’ve likely read about a mushroom leather product–a coat, a bag, or a pair of sneakers. “Mushroom leather,” however, is a bit of an oversimplification; it’s more accurately a mycelium-based material. Mycelium is the underground, root-like structure of mushrooms that lives and feeds off of other organic matter. Under the right, lab-controlled conditions, mycelium can be grown into sheets that can mimic the look, feel and durability of animal-derived leather. For MycoWorks, this creation is called Reishi. MycoWorks, soon to turn 10 years old, has grown alongside its flagship material. In the time we’ve launched FUTUREVVORLD nearly two years ago, we’ve seen MycoWorks collaborate with the likes of luxury fashion house Hermès, designer Heron Preston, milliner Nick Fouquet, and most recently automaker General Motors, where the two are exploring the possibilities of using mycelium leather in our cars. In our interview with Philip we talk about how MycoWorks found its beginning in the art world, particularly sculpture by Mr. Ross himself, how Reishi is changing industries, the power of collaboration and storytelling in changing those aforesaid industries, what’s next for MycoWorks, and so much more. <>If you enjoyed this episode, or any of our episodes, please subscribe, rate us and leave a comment. It would be greatly appreciated.Also, be sure to sign up for our newsletter at futurevvorld.com and follow us on Instagram @futurevvorld.
Natural Fiber Welding's Plastic Free FUTUREVVORLD
Nov 18 2022
Natural Fiber Welding's Plastic Free FUTUREVVORLD
Luke Haverhals came to the latest episode of Progress Over Perfection donned in items made with his own brand’s materials: a Ralph Lauren tee and Allbirds kicks. Clearly, he’s a man on a mission. And his mission is to get humans off the petrochemical supply chain and back onto the natural one.Haverhals is the CEO and Founder of NFW (Natural Fiber Welding), known for its revolutionary plant-based materials MIRUM® and CLARUS®, and used by the likes of Camper and Pangaia. At NFW, if it ain’t 100 percent it ain’t good enough. If you take a look at the materials that it produces, you won’t find a drop of petrol or toxic chemicals anywhere. Whereas some companies may mix plastic-based materials with plant-based ones, NFW is 100 percent plastic free.We sat down with Haverhals for a very interesting chat that moved from the efficiencies of engineered materials (a roll of MIRUM is much more efficient than an irregular shaped cow hide) to the hard economic truths of next-gen material production, and how to be “compatible with the Earth.”Haverhals and Daniel Navetta, FVV’s Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief, also talked about what real transparency and traceability looks like. Humanity is “destined to end in tragedy [if we’re not] truthful and holistic about how we measure and discuss our impact,” says Haverhals. “And that’s something that’s not happening well in our world right now.”The big issue of scalability was also tackled. “If you want to change the world, you've got to get thousands of brands, including the biggest brands in the world, to show up to your place of business,” says Haverhals. You’ve got to go all in. And if the problem you’re facing is as destructive as the climate crisis, your solutions better be moonshot in ambition.“When you look at the 2050, 2030 climate goals, human rights goals, those things will not happen with people who simply do incremental tinkering on the current system. It requires radical vision and disruption of the current system. Not every part of the system, but certain parts cannot stay the same and should not be recognizable by 2050.”Plenty more fascinating subjects are addressed, including why we should think about materials as nutrients for the Earth. It’s tasty stuff.<>If you enjoyed this episode, or any of our episodes, please subscribe, rate us and leave a comment. It would be greatly appreciated.Also, be sure to sign up for our newsletter at futurevvorld.com and follow us on Instagram @futurevvorld.
How Pineapples Became the Leather On Your Nikes
Oct 28 2022
How Pineapples Became the Leather On Your Nikes
It’s been a little while but here we are, back with another episode of our podcast, Progress Over Perfection. For this ep, we sat down with Dr. Carmen Hijosa, the Founder and Chief Creative and Innovation Officer at Ananas Anam, the company behind Piñatex. Piñatex is the exciting plant-based leather alternative made from waste pineapple leaves. But don’t just think of it as a leather alternative. Dr. Hijosa prefers to see it as its own thing.“I don’t even like to compare it with [leather] because it’s a new material,” she said. “Of course it’s not like leather. Forget about leather!” And Dr. Hijosa knows leather. She worked with it for 15 years before making the transition to plant-based textiles. She also knows that Piñatex passes all the performance tests. If it didn’t, the likes of Nike and Saucony wouldn't use it.Both brands have collaborated with Ananas Anam. In May, we reported on Saucony giving its Jazz Court sneaker a pineapple-fresh update. It’s also worth checking out Nike’s "Happy Pineapple" collection which reimagined such classics as the Air Force 1, Air Max 95 and Air Max 90.Dr. Hijosa talked about her love of sneakers in her chat with FVV’s Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief Daniel Navetta. They also talked about the challenges of upscaling, the power of a good collaboration, and the problem of greenwashing in the industry. But it seems like the real joy that Dr. Hijosa gets from her work, is the positive impact it’s having on the people who make it, as well as the planet that it’s sourced from. “We know everybody in our supply chain. We know where the fibers come from. We know the farmers. This is a privilege. For a big company, it's impossible to understand [their entire] supply chain.” Collaborating with the likes of Nike not only brings Ananas Anam status but also helps it grow steadily. And that growth helps communities and families around the world, like in the Philippines where Annas Anam works. We hope that Piñatex continues to grow because it’s a truly awesome material and Dr. Hijosa is a truly inspirational human. <>If you enjoyed this episode, or any of our episodes, please subscribe, rate us and leave a comment. It would be greatly appreciated.Also, be sure to sign up for our newsletter at futurevvorld.com and follow us on Instagram @futurevvorld.
An Interview With Dr. Amanda Parkes, PANGAIA’s Chief Innovation Officer
May 20 2022
An Interview With Dr. Amanda Parkes, PANGAIA’s Chief Innovation Officer
For the Season 2 Episode 2 of Progress Over Perfection, FUTUREVVORLD sits down with PANGAIA’s Chief Innovation Officer, Dr. Amanda Parkes. Dr. Parkes is the scientific and strategic driving force behind PANAGAIA, a brand that we’ve highlighted several times on FUTUREVVORLD. Its collection of colorful wardrobe basics are not as basic as they seem. Lift the lid and you’ll find biodegradable sweat suits made from eucalyptus plants, accessories made from a mushroom leather alternative, and sunglasses made from carbon dioxide.With a background in computer and material science plus a wealth of art and design experience, Dr. Parkes operates in an interesting space. Her role as Chief Innovation Officer means she oversees how the company sources materials and which projects it invests in.In this interview, she discusses what she calls the “valley of death” between the research lab and the commercial fashion industry, and how PANAGAIA acts as a bridge over that gap. She also gives us her thoughts on regulations in the sustainability industry, coming into fashion through the back door, and what we’re getting wrong about microplastics.Sustainability is not about finding one perfect solution. It’s about progress. The only competition for brands should be the materials and processes that are harmful to our planet. “In the same way that nature functions best when you have biodiversity, we really see that in the same way for the material ecology and economy of our brand,” says Dr. Parkes.Sit back and enjoy our conversation with the wonderfully insight Dr. Amanda Parkes.<>If you enjoyed this episode, or any of our episodes, please subscribe, rate us and leave a comment. It would be greatly appreciated.Also, be sure to sign up for our newsletter at futurevvorld.com and follow us on Instagram @futurevvorld.