Coaching for Leaders

Dave Stachowiak

Leaders aren’t born, they’re made. This Monday show helps you discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations. Independently produced weekly since 2011, Dr. Dave Stachowiak brings perspective from a thriving, global leadership academy, plus more than 15 years of leadership at Dale Carnegie. Bestselling authors, expert researchers, deep conversation, and regular dialogue with listeners have attracted 25 million downloads and the #1 search result for management on Apple Podcasts. Activate your FREE membership to search the entire episode library by topic at CoachingforLeaders.com

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596: The Ways Leadership Can Derail Us, with Bill George
6d ago
596: The Ways Leadership Can Derail Us, with Bill George
Bill George: True North Bill George is executive fellow at Harvard Business School, where he has taught leadership since 2004. He is the author of four best-selling books: Authentic Leadership, True North, Discover Your True North, and 7 Lessons for Leading in Crisis. He was chair and CEO of Medtronic, the world’s leading medical technology company. Under his leadership, Medtronic’s market capitalization grew from $1.1 billion to $60 billion, averaging 35 percent a year. Bill has served as a director of Goldman Sachs, ExxonMobil, Novartis, Target, the Mayo Clinic, and World Economic Forum USA. He has been named one of the Top 25 Business Leaders of the Past 25 Years by PBS, Executive of the Year by Academy of Management, and Director of the Year by National Association of Corporate Directors. He is the author with Zach Clayton of True North: Leading Authentically in Today's Workplace, Emerging Leader Edition*. We’ve all seen leadership go badly and most of us struggle with tendencies to get pulled off course. In this conversation, Bill and I explore the five most common archetypes that tend to derail leaders and the antidote that prevents them. We also discuss how we can recognize these tendencies in ourselves so that we can do better for others. Key Points Five archetypes of leadership derailment: Imposters: political animals who figure out who their competitors and then eliminate them. Rationalizers: masters of denial who don’t take responsibility themselves. Glory seekers: motivated by the acclaim of the world. Loners: they believe they can make it on their own and reject feedback. Shooting stars: they build shallow foundations and move on quickly to the next things, often avoiding commitment. Antidotes to leadership derailment: Write down the most difficult ethical dilemma you are currently facing and chronicle the “least generous” interpretation of your actions. Project forward a decade and assume the worst: you have derailed in a major failure. Envision the situation in which you could lose your way. Resources Mentioned True North: Leading Authentically in Today's Workplace, Emerging Leader Edition* by Bill George and Zach Clayton Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Discover Your True North, with Bill George (episode 225) Leadership Lies We Tell Ourselves, with Emily Leathers (episode 479) How to Help Your Manager Shine, with David Gergen (episode 588) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
596: The Ways Leadership Can Derail Us, with Bill George
6d ago
596: The Ways Leadership Can Derail Us, with Bill George
Bill George: True North Bill George is executive fellow at Harvard Business School, where he has taught leadership since 2004. He is the author of four best-selling books: Authentic Leadership, True North, Discover Your True North, and 7 Lessons for Leading in Crisis. He was chair and CEO of Medtronic, the world’s leading medical technology company. Under his leadership, Medtronic’s market capitalization grew from $1.1 billion to $60 billion, averaging 35 percent a year. Bill has served as a director of Goldman Sachs, ExxonMobil, Novartis, Target, the Mayo Clinic, and World Economic Forum USA. He has been named one of the Top 25 Business Leaders of the Past 25 Years by PBS, Executive of the Year by Academy of Management, and Director of the Year by National Association of Corporate Directors. He is the author with Zach Clayton of True North: Leading Authentically in Today's Workplace, Emerging Leader Edition*. We’ve all seen leadership go badly and most of us struggle with tendencies to get pulled off course. In this conversation, Bill and I explore the five most common archetypes that tend to derail leaders and the antidote that prevents them. We also discuss how we can recognize these tendencies in ourselves so that we can do better for others. Key Points Five archetypes of leadership derailment: Imposters: political animals who figure out who their competitors and then eliminate them. Rationalizers: masters of denial who don’t take responsibility themselves. Glory seekers: motivated by the acclaim of the world. Loners: they believe they can make it on their own and reject feedback. Shooting stars: they build shallow foundations and move on quickly to the next things, often avoiding commitment. Antidotes to leadership derailment: Write down the most difficult ethical dilemma you are currently facing and chronicle the “least generous” interpretation of your actions. Project forward a decade and assume the worst: you have derailed in a major failure. Envision the situation in which you could lose your way. Resources Mentioned True North: Leading Authentically in Today's Workplace, Emerging Leader Edition* by Bill George and Zach Clayton Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Discover Your True North, with Bill George (episode 225) Leadership Lies We Tell Ourselves, with Emily Leathers (episode 479) How to Help Your Manager Shine, with David Gergen (episode 588) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
595: How to Deal With Passive-Aggressive People, Amy Gallo
19-09-2022
595: How to Deal With Passive-Aggressive People, Amy Gallo
Amy Gallo: Getting Along Amy Gallo is an expert in conflict, communication, and workplace dynamics. She combines the latest management research with practical advice to deliver evidence-based ideas on how to improve relationships and excel at work. In her role as a contributing editor at Harvard Business Review, Amy writes about interpersonal dynamics, communicating ideas, leading and influencing people, and building your career. Amy is co-host of HBR's Women at Work podcast and author of both the HBR Guide to Dealing with Conflict and Getting Along: How to Work with Anyone (Even Difficult People)*. In this conversation, Amy and I discuss one of the most common questions she receives from leaders: how do I handle a colleague who’s passive aggressive? We examine what causes this behavior, how to respond to it, and what to avoid that could worsen the relationship. Plus, we discuss the intention that leaders can bring in responding to passive-aggressive behavior that will help everybody move forward. Key Points Don’t use the “passive-aggressive behavior” to label someone. It rarely helps and often results in more defensiveness. Focus on the other person’s underlying concern or question rather than how they are expressing it. Not everyone is able to discuss thoughts and feelings openly. Consider doing hypothesis testing to determine what’s next. Language like, “Here’s the story I’m telling myself…” can help everyone move forward without assigning blame. When making a direct request, stick to the facts. Review past behavior like you’re a referee vs. a fan. Artificial harmony is a danger spot for teams and leaders. Setting norms can help to reduce passive-aggressive behavior. Resources Mentioned Getting Along: How to Work with Anyone (Even Difficult People)* by Amy Gallo Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344) Four Habits That Derail Listening, with Oscar Trimboli (episode 500) How to Prepare for Conflict, with Amy Gallo (episode 530) The Way to Get People Talking, with Andrew Warner (episode 560) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
594: How to Begin Difficult Conversations About Race, with Kwame Christian
12-09-2022
594: How to Begin Difficult Conversations About Race, with Kwame Christian
Kwame Christian: How to Have Difficult Conversations About Race Kwame Christian is a best-selling author, lawyer, professor, and the Managing Director of the American Negotiation Institute. He has conducted countless specialized trainings worldwide and is a highly sought after keynote speaker. His best-selling book, Finding Confidence in Conflict has helped countless individuals overcome the fear, anxiety, and emotion associated with difficult conversations. The book was inspired by Kwame’s TED Talk with the same name that has over 250,000 views. He’s also host of the Negotiate Anything Podcast, the most popular negotiation podcast in the world. Kwame was the recipient of the John Glenn College of Public Affairs Young Alumni Achievement Award in 2020 and the Moritz College of Law Outstanding Recent Alumnus Award 2021. Additionally, Kwame is a business lawyer at Carlile, Patchen & Murphy LLP and serves a professor for The Ohio State University’s Moritz College of Law in its top-ranked dispute resolution program and Otterbein University’s MBA program. He is also a Contributor for Forbes and his LinkedIn Learning course, How to Be Both Likable And Assertive, was the most popular course on the platform in July of 2021. He is the author of How to Have Difficult Conversations About Race: Practical Tools for Necessary Change in the Workplace and Beyond*. In this conversation, Kwame and I discuss how to begin a difficult conversation about race. We explore the key questions that each of us should ask ourselves so that we can determine in advance what we want to gain from a tough conversation. Finally, we look at the three critical things to say in the first 30 seconds that will help you start an important conversation that helps everybody move forward. Key Points It's hard for someone else to appreciate how much of a person's identity affects every other area of their lives until you've lived it. People explain away racism because they don’t like it and don’t want it to be true. Whether you think a conversation is about race or not, if it’s about race for the other person then you’re having a conversation about race. There questions to ask yourself before a conversation: What do I hope to accomplish in this conversation? Given what I know about them and the situation, what is likely to be their goal? What are three questions I can ask them that will help me to understand their position? Use situation, impact, and invitation as the starting point for a difficult conversation. Usually this is less than 30 seconds. “Naked facts” reduce the likelihood that someone will dispute the premise of what you are addressing. Resources Mentioned How to Have Difficult Conversations About Race: Practical Tools for Necessary Change in the Workplace and Beyond* by Kwame Christian Negotiate Anything podcast Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way Into Difficult Conversations, with Kwame Christian (episode 497) How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510) The Way Managers Can be Champions for Justice, with Minda Harts (episode 552) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
593: How to Start Finding Useful Stories, with David Hutchens
05-09-2022
593: How to Start Finding Useful Stories, with David Hutchens
David Hutchens: Story Dash David Hutchens helps leaders find and tell their stories. He works with leaders around the world to find, craft, and tell their most urgent stories for the purpose of creating shared meaning, preserving culture, disseminating learning, and speeding change in organizations. He has taught the Storytelling Leader program at some of the most influential organizations — and he’s written many books, including the Circle of the 9 Muses and The Leadership Story Deck. He is the co-creator with longtime friend of the show Susan Gerke of the GO Team program. He's also the author of the new book, Story Dash: Find, Develop, and Activate Your Most Valuable Business Stories…In Just a Few Hours. In this conversation, David and I discuss how to find stories that you can use in your organization. We reflect on the reality that we both hear many leaders say to us: “How do I find the right stories?” David then shares the key principles and steps that every leader can take to surface and curate the best stories. Key Points The “Us At Our Best” taxonomy is what it looks like when are are delivering with energy and excellence. A recent Southwest Airlines story is an example of this. Find the area the area of your work where you need to influence the emotional system. Trust stories about small moments. Don’t attempt to create an epic drama of huge importance. The best stories are individual incidents that send a bigger message. Formal story mining can be done alone or as team building. Institutionalizing practices like story sharing can help this happen regularly and naturally. When informally collecting stories, listen for time, place, and person as signals that a story is beginning. Resources Mentioned Download a free set of Story Deck cards or… Reach out to David directly at david@davidhutchens.com for more free resources Purchase the full set of Leadership Story Deck by David Hutchens Related Episodes How to Create an Unstoppable Culture, with Ginger Hardage (episode 350) Three Stories to Tell During Uncertainty, with David Hutchens (episode 486) The Way to Earn Attention, with Raja Rajamannar (episode 521) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
592: How to Change the Way You Think, with Ari Weinzweig
29-08-2022
592: How to Change the Way You Think, with Ari Weinzweig
Ari Weinzweig: A Lapsed Anarchist’s Approach to The Power of Beliefs in Business In 1982, Ari, along with his partner Paul Saginaw, founded Zingerman’s Delicatessen with a $20,000 bank loan, a Russian History degree from the University of Michigan, 4 years of experience washing dishes, cooking, and managing in restaurant kitchens and chutzpah from his hometown of Chicago. Today, Zingerman’s Delicatessen is a nationally renowned food icon and the Zingerman’s Community of Businesses has grown to 10 businesses with over 750 employees and over $55 million in annual revenue. Besides being the Co-Founding Partner and being actively engaged in some aspect of the day-to-day operations and governance of nearly every business in the Zingerman’s Community, Ari is also a prolific writer. His most recent publications are the first 4 of his 6 book series Zingerman’s Guide to Good Leading, including A Lapsed Anarchist’s Approach to The Power of Beliefs in Business. In this conversation, Ari and I explore how the power of our beliefs show up in virtually every one of our daily actions. We examine how to begin looking at what isn’t working and how to start examining our beliefs. When those beliefs aren’t working, Ari shares several, critical steps we can take to begin to change our thinking. Key Points Our beliefs, many of which we may not be consciously aware of, are often calling the shots in our daily actions and behaviors. Start examining a belief by picking a current problem to address. Listen carefully to your internal voices to identify the language showing up. Notice places especially where you frame things as facts, certitudes, thoughts, theories, norms, shoulds, and should nots. Examine how you came to the beliefs that you uncover. Then, confront your cannons. Change now, find facts later. Most people do that the opposite way. Resources Mentioned A Lapsed Anarchist's Approach to the Power of Beliefs in Business by Ari Weinzweig Humility: A Humble, Anarchistic Inquiry by Ari Weinzweig Schein On, You Crazy Diamond by Ari Weinzweig Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 363) How to Help People Engage in Growth, with Whitney Johnson (episode 576) Help People Show Up as Themselves, with Frederic Laloux (episode 580) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
591: How to Build a Network While Still Doing Everything Else, with Ruth Gotian
22-08-2022
591: How to Build a Network While Still Doing Everything Else, with Ruth Gotian
Ruth Gotian: The Success Factor Ruth Gotian has been hailed by the journal Nature and Columbia University as an expert in mentorship and leadership development. Recently, she was named as the #1 emerging management thinker in the world by Thinkers50. She was a semi-finalist for the Forbes 50 Over 50 list and has coached and mentored hundreds of people throughout her career. In addition to being published in academic journals, she is a contributor to Forbes and Psychology Today, where she writes about optimizing success. She is the Chief Learning Officer in Anesthesiology and former Assistant Dean of Mentoring and Executive Director of the Mentoring Academy at Weill Cornell Medicine, where she is a faculty member. She is the author of The Success Factor: Developing the Mindset and Skillset for Peak Business Performance*. In this conversation, Ruth and I explore her research on how high achievers build their networks — and also what works for us both in our personal practices. We discuss several tactics that most leaders can use to strengthen existing networks. Plus, we examine the mindsets that tend to lead to success in professional relationships, in spite of busy schedules. Key Points High achievers are always seeking perspective, insight, and inspiration from people in many different career stages and disciplines. Use the 24/7/30 rule when making new connections. Reach out within 24 hours, again in 7 days, and also at 30 days. Almost always there is a way you can add value to another person, even if they are at the top of professional game. Find that way to help. When you create content on social media, you emerge as one of the 1% of professionals who choose to do this. Give without expectation of anything in return. Resources Mentioned The Success Factor: Developing the Mindset and Skillset for Peak Business Performance* by Ruth Gotian How Do You Find a Decent Mentor When You’re Stuck at Home? by Ruth Gotian Networking for Introverted Scientists by Ruth Gotian Conversation Starters by Ruth Gotian Related Episodes The Power of Weak Connections, with David Burkus (episode 347) How to Strengthen Your Network, with Marissa King (episode 425) How to Get Noticed on LinkedIn, with Stephen Hart (episode 495) How to Lead and Retain High Performers, with Ruth Gotian (episode 567) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
590: How to Genuinely Show Up for Others, with Marshall Goldsmith
15-08-2022
590: How to Genuinely Show Up for Others, with Marshall Goldsmith
Marshall Goldsmith: The Earned Life Marshall Goldsmith is one of the world’s leading executive coaches and the New York Times bestselling author of many books, including What Got You Here Won’t Get You There, Mojo, and Triggers. In his coaching practice, he has advised more than 150 major CEOs and their management teams, including clients like Alan Mulally, Frances Hesselbein, and Hubert Joly. His newest book is The Earned Life: Lose Regret, Choose Fulfillment*. We’ve all heard about the benefits of empathy and most of us assume that more empathy for the people we lead is always better. In this conversation, Marshall and I look at the different types of empathy and explore the downsides of leaning into empathy too much. Plus, we discuss how singular empathy can help busy leaders stay present in the midst of their busy schedules. Key Points There are multiple types of empathy — and each of them bring challenges along with their positive attributes. We often hit the reset button successfully at work, but then neglect it in our personal relationships. Singular empathy helps us to stay present with people and to move between the multiple spaces and situations that most leaders find themselves in daily. A key question for us all to ask ourselves: am I being the person I want to be right now? Resources Mentioned The Earned Life: Lose Regret, Choose Fulfillment* by Marshall Goldsmith Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Stop Rescuing People From Their Problems, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 284) Getting Better at Empathy, with Daniel Goleman (episode 391) The Way to Be More Self-Aware, with Tasha Eurich (episode 442) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
589: How to Create Inclusive Hiring Practices, with Ruchika Tulshyan
08-08-2022
589: How to Create Inclusive Hiring Practices, with Ruchika Tulshyan
Ruchika Tulshyan: Inclusion on Purpose Ruchika Tulshyan is the founder of Candour, a global inclusion strategy firm. She is a regular contributor to The New York Times and Harvard Business Review. As a keynote speaker, Ruchika has addressed organizations like NASA, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the United States Congress. Ruchika is the author of The Diversity Advantage: Fixing Gender Inequality in the Workplace, and most recently, Inclusion on Purpose: An Intersectional Approach to Creating a Culture of Belonging at Work*. She is on the Thinkers50 Radar list and named as one of Hive Learning's Most Influential D&I Professionals for the past two years. In this conversation, Ruchika and I discuss how leaders can adapt their hiring practices to attract more diverse candidates — and ultimately support inclusion inside their organizations. We discuss the importance of what to both include and avoid in job postings. Plus, we examine how well-intended interview practices can sometimes have unintended results on supporting diversity and inclusion. Key Points Make the hiring process transparent from start to finish. Include an authentic equal opportunity statement. Refrain from using certain words in job listings. Examples include: rockstar, ninja, hacker, guru, manage, build, aggressive, fearless, independent, analytic, and assertive. Emphasize skills and experience over professional degrees. Avoid panel interviews and refrain from asking questions or having conversations about culture fit. Resources Mentioned Inclusion on Purpose: An Intersectional Approach to Creating a Culture of Belonging at Work* by Ruchika Tulshyan Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Get the Ideal Team Player, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 301) How to Be More Inclusive, with Stefanie Johnson (episode 508) Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
588: How to Help Your Manager Shine, with David Gergen
01-08-2022
588: How to Help Your Manager Shine, with David Gergen
David Gergen: Hearts Touched With Fire David Gergen has served as a White House adviser to four US presidents of both political parties: Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, and Bill Clinton. He then served as the editor of US News & World Report. For the past two decades, he has served as a professor of public service and founding director of the Center for Public Leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School. David is also a senior political analyst for CNN, where he is a respected voice in national and international affairs. He is the author of Hearts Touched with Fire: How Great Leaders Are Made*. In this conversation, David and I discuss his years working in the White House for four different presidents. We explore what worked for David to be able to support a powerful person in being the best version of themselves. Plus, we discuss how to speak truth to power, the strategy of playing to strengths, and the critical importance of staying aligned with the big picture. Key Points Speaking up means you ensure that your manager has considered alternate perspectives. Be aware of your own shortcomings so you do not bias your own advice. You made need to help a manager overcome their own challenges. Help them play to their strengths. Beware of managing up with arrogance. Instead, create zones and pathways that can help a manager make tough calls. Making a suggestion in a short note can be one way to open up a tough conversation. Keep the bigger, nobler motive in mind at all times. Advocate for that larger vision. Resources Mentioned Hearts Touched with Fire: How Great Leaders Are Made* by David Gergen The Bin Laden Raid: Inside the Situation Room Photo Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Start Managing Up, with Tom Henschel (episode 433) Leadership in the Midst of Chaos, with Jim Mattis (episode 440) How to be Diplomatic, with Susan Rice (episode 456) Your Leadership Motive, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 505) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
587: Enhancing Teamwork and Confidence, with Bonni Stachowiak
04-07-2022
587: Enhancing Teamwork and Confidence, with Bonni Stachowiak
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Listener Questions Margaret is wondering what resources we’d recommend for her team to identify different communication styles. Jeff asked us what steps we might take to help someone increase their confidence. Christopher mentioned a prior episode and is seeking our advice on what to do when challenging authority is ignored. Resources Mentioned GO Team Resources by Susan Gerke and David Hutchens Creative Acts for Curious People* by Sarah Stein Greenberg Emergent Strategy* by adrienne maree brown StrengthsFinder Dignity: Its Essential Role in Resolving Conflict* by Donna Hicks Related Episodes How Teams Use StrengthsFinder Results, with Lisa Cummings (episode 293) How to Lead an Offsite, with Tom Henschel (episode 377) End Imposter Syndrome in Your Organization, with Jodi-Ann Burey (episode 556) The Way to Make Struggles More Productive, with Sarah Stein Greenberg (episode 569) Make It Easier to Challenge Authority, with Richard Rierson (episode 575) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
586: How to Involve Stakeholders in Decisions, with Eric Pliner
27-06-2022
586: How to Involve Stakeholders in Decisions, with Eric Pliner
Eric Pliner: Difficult Decisions Eric Pliner is chief executive officer of YSC Consulting. He has designed and implemented leadership strategy in partnership with some of the world’s best-known CEOs and organizations. Eric’s writing has been featured in Harvard Business Review, Fortune, Forbes, and Fast Company. A member of the Dramatists’ Guild of America, Eric is co-author of the U.S. National Standards for Health Education and Spooky Dog & the Teen-Age Gang Mysteries (with Amy Rhodes), an Off-Broadway theatrical parody of television cartoons for adults. He is a board director with Hip Hop Public Health. He is also the author of Difficult Decisions: How Leaders Make the Right Call with Insight, Integrity, and Empathy*. In this conversation, Eric and I discuss the difficult and sometimes awkward moments when we engage other stakeholders in our decisions. We explore the language to use when discussing a stakeholder’s role in a decision. Plus, Eric details how to establish clear expectations about involvement in decisions to avoid sending messages that we otherwise don’t intend. Key Points Clarify who you will engage and how you intend to do so. Before discussing a decision with a stakeholder, explain how the decision is going to be made. Make it clear if you’re offering them a views, a voice, a vote, or a veto. Standardize your individual and team processes for decision-making. Ask the stakeholder for input — and go deeper with a second or third question to appreciate what’s behind what they’ve said. Remind stakeholders how the decision will be made when you conclude. Don’t underestimated the importance of this step. Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Influence Many Stakeholders, with Andy Kaufman (episode 240) How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328) The Way to Make Better Decisions, with Annie Duke (episode 499) Handling a Difficult Stakeholder, with Nick Timiraos (episode 581) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
585: How Top Leaders Influence Great Teamwork, with Scott Keller
20-06-2022
585: How Top Leaders Influence Great Teamwork, with Scott Keller
Scott Keller: CEO Excellence Scott is a senior partner in McKinsey’s Southern California office. He co-leads the firm’s global CEO Excellence service line and is the author of six books, including the bestseller Beyond Performance. Scott spent his early consulting years working on business strategy and operational topics until his life was turned upside down when his second child was born with profound special needs. After taking time off to attend to his family, Scott returned to McKinsey with the desire to bring the best of psychology, social science, and the study of human potential into the workplace. He is a cofounder of Digital Divide Data and one of a few hundred people in history known to have traveled to every country in the world. His most recent book written with Carolyn Dewar and Vikram Malhotra is titled CEO Excellence: The Six Mindsets That Distinguish the Best Leaders from the Rest*. In this conversation, Scott and I examine McKinsey’s research on what the top CEOs do (and avoid) when building great teams. We look at a few of the key mindsets that the best CEOs bring to their organizations — and how teamwork plays into this. Plus, we explore some of the key questions top leaders should ask when determining if it’s time to exit someone from the team. Key Points Top leaders staff for both aptitude and attitude. The have an eye to both the short and long term. The most successful CEOs have a mindset of “first team” and expect leaders in the organization to prioritize serving the whole team/organization over any functional area. New CEOs are often known for acting quickly on staffing, but the most successful leaders also temper this with fairness. They use the four questions below to act with both fairness and speed. Top leaders stay connected with people throughout the organization, but also keep some distance. There’s a key distinction between being friendly and making friends. The best CEO’s ensure that they have positively addressed all four questions below before removing somebody: Does the team member know exactly what’s expected of them: i.e., what the agenda is and what jobs need to be done to drive that agenda? Have they been given the needed tools and resources, and a chance to build the necessary skills and confidence to use them effectively? Are they surrounded by others (including the CEO) who are aligned on a common direction and who display the desired mindsets and behaviors? Is it clear what the consequences are if they don’t get on board and deliver? Resources Mentioned CEO Excellence: The Six Mindsets That Distinguish the Best Leaders from the Rest* by Carolyn Dewar, Scott Keller, and Vikram Malhotra The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate - Discoveries from a Secret World* by Peter Wohlleben Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192) How to Sell Your Vision, with Michael Hyatt (episode 482) Your Leadership Motive, with Patrick Lencioni (episode 505) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
584: The Starting Point for Inclusive Leadership, with Susan MacKenty Brady
13-06-2022
584: The Starting Point for Inclusive Leadership, with Susan MacKenty Brady
Susan MacKenty Brady: Arrive and Thrive Susan MacKenty Brady is the Deloitte Ellen Gabriel Chair for Women and Leadership at Simmons University and the first Chief Executive Officer of The Simmons University Institute for Inclusive Leadership. As a relationship expert, leadership wellbeing coach, author, and speaker, Susan educates leaders and executives globally on fostering self-awareness for optimal leadership. Susan advises executive teams on how to work together effectively and create inclusion and gender parity in organizations. She is the coauthor, along with Janet Foutty and Lynn Perry Wooten, of The Wall Street Journal bestselling book, Arrive and Thrive: 7 Impactful Practices for Women Navigating Leadership*. In this conversation, Susan and I discuss the reality that while we may intend well on inclusion, real change starts with us first. We explore how implicit bias assessments can be useful in discovering where they bias is that we don’t see in ourselves. Plus, we examine some of the key actions we can take on relationship building and repair in order to get better. Key Points Most of us intend well, but we often miss the opportunity to move from being an ally (alignment) to being an upstander (taking action in the moment). Utilizing an assessment can help us understand where our implicit biases diverge from our conscious thoughts. Curiosity and relationship-building isn’t just for the moment — it’s the before, during, and after of conversations to discover how we get better. When we make a misstep, move quickly and purposefully to repair the relationship. Resources Mentioned Arrive and Thrive: 7 Impactful Practices for Women Navigating Leadership* by Susan MacKenty Brady, Janet Foutty, and Lynn Perry Wooten The Inclusive Leader's Playbook by Susan MacKenty Brady, Elisa van Dam, and Loe Lee Project Implicit: Implicit Association Tests Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398) How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) How to Be More Inclusive, with Stefanie Johnson (episode 508) How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
583: How to Give Feedback, with Russ Laraway
06-06-2022
583: How to Give Feedback, with Russ Laraway
Russ Laraway: When They Win, You Win Russ has had a diverse 28 year operational management career. He was a Company Commander in the Marine Corps before starting his first company, Pathfinders. From there, Russ went to the Wharton School, and then onto management roles at Google and Twitter. He then co-founded Candor, Inc., along with best selling author and past guest Kim Scott. Over the last several years, Russ served as the Chief People Officer at Qualtrics, and is now the Chief People Officer for the fast-growing venture capital firm, Goodwater Capital, where he is helping Goodwater and its portfolio companies to empower their people to do great work and be totally psyched while doing it. He's the author of the book When They Win, You Win: Being a Great Manager Is Simpler Than You Think*. It’s the job of every leader to give feedback. In this episode, Russ and I discuss what to say and what to avoid when giving feedback. Plus, we explore how to think about truth and the most effective ways to start and close feedback conversations in order to help everybody move forward. Key Points Avoid spending too much time talking about the impending conversation and just have the conversation. Use language like this: “I think I’m seeing some behavior that I believe is getting in your way. Are you in a spot where you can hear that right now?” Use the framework of situation, behavior/work, and impact in order to organize your feedback. Invite dialogue by asking: “What are your thoughts about that?” Avoid framing feedback discussions around “the truth” — there are always multiple truths in every discussion like this. You are offering them what you see. Resources Mentioned When They Win, You Win: Being a Great Manager Is Simpler Than You Think* by Russ Laraway When They Win, You Win website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Three Steps to Soliciting Feedback, with Tom Henschel (episode 107) Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway (episode 370) How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) How to Reduce Bias in Feedback, with Therese Huston (episode 510) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
582: How to Compare Yourself to Others, with Mollie West Duffy
30-05-2022
582: How to Compare Yourself to Others, with Mollie West Duffy
Mollie West Duffy: Big Feelings Mollie West Duffy is an expert in organizational design, development, and leadership coaching. She previously was an organizational design lead at global innovation firm IDEO. She’s helped advise and coach leaders and founders at companies including Casper, Google, LinkedIn, Bungalow, and Slack. She’s experienced in designing talent processes and systems, as well as organizational structures and behaviors, cultural values, and learning and development programs. She's written for Harvard Business Review, Fast Company, Entrepreneur, Quartz, and other digital outlets. She co-founded the Capital Good Fund, Rhode Island's first microfinance fund. She is the co-author with Liz Fosslien of the Wall Street Journal bestseller No Hard Feelings: The Secret Power of Embracing Emotions at Work and now their second book Big Feelings: How To Be Okay When Things Are Not Okay*. We’ve all heard the well-intended advice that we should not compare ourselves to others. In this conversation, Mollie and I explore why that's almost impossible to do and how we can cooperate a bit more with the inevitable and make our comparisons more useful. We highlight some of the key ways that comparison can help us and where leaning in may actually be useful in your own happiness and development. Key Points It’s a myth that the less you compare yourself to others, the better. Often, the opposite is true: we don’t compare ourselves enough. We tend to compare our weaknesses to other people's strengths. Finding ways to curate our inputs is often much more useful. Shifting from malicious envy to benign envy is helpful. Thoughts such as “I’m inspired by what they’ve done…” or “I haven’t done what they’ve done…yet,” can move us to a healthier place. We see the best of people on social media. It’s helpful to piece together the missing footage by comparing some of the nitty gritty. Compare present you against past you. Resources Mentioned Big Feelings: How To Be Okay When Things Are Not Okay* by Liz Fosslien and Mollie West Duffy How to Manage Your Anger at Work by Liz Fosslien and Mollie West Duffy Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Four Steps to Get Unstuck and Embrace Change, with Susan David (episode 297) What to Do With Your Feelings, with Lori Gottlieb (episode 438) How to Reduce Burnout, with Jennifer Moss (episode 561) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
581: Handling a Difficult Stakeholder, with Nick Timiraos
23-05-2022
581: Handling a Difficult Stakeholder, with Nick Timiraos
Nick Timiraos: Trillion Dollar Triage Nick Timiraos has been the chief economics correspondent at The Wall Street Journal since 2017, where he is responsible for covering the Federal Reserve and other major developments in U.S. economic policy. He joined the Journal in 2006 and previously covered the 2008 presidential election. He wrote about U.S. housing markets and the mortgage industry as a reporter based in New York. His coverage included the government’s response to the foreclosure crisis and the takeover of finance companies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Nick is the author of Trillion Dollar Triage: How Jay Powell and the Fed Battled a President and a Pandemic -- and Prevented Economic Disaster*. Key Points Some of Federal Reserve Chair Jerome “Jay” Powell’s core skills have helped him navigate difficult stakeholders: He’s highly regarded as a good listener with excellent emotional intelligence. He’s intentional about creating strong teams and espoused the value of teamwork regularly. He is mindful of daily events, but is always playing the long game. He speaks in plain language that makes sense to many people, regardless of their education level. Specifically, four unwritten rules of dealing with a difficult stakeholder like Donald Trump emerged in Nick’s analysis of Jay Powell’s public appearances: Don’t talk about Trump. When provoked, don’t return fire. Stick to the economy, not politics. Develop allies outside the Oval Office. Resources Mentioned Trillion Dollar Triage: How Jay Powell and the Fed Battled a President and a Pandemic -- and Prevented Economic Disaster* by Nick Timiraos Nick Timiraos website Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Listen When Someone Is Venting, with Mark Goulston (episode 91) How to Handle a Boss Who’s a Jerk, with Tom Henschel (episode 164) The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
580: Help People Show Up as Themselves, with Frederic Laloux
16-05-2022
580: Help People Show Up as Themselves, with Frederic Laloux
Frederic Laloux: Reinventing Organizations Frederic is the author of Reinventing Organizations: A Guide to Creating Organizations Inspired by the Next Stage of Human Consciousness*. The book is a global word-of-mouth bestseller with over 850,000 copies sold in 20 languages. Frederic’s work has inspired the founders of Extinction Rebellion, the Sunrise Movement, and Project Drawdown, as well as countless corporate leaders and faith movements. In a past life, he was an associate principal with McKinsey & Company. He's also the creator of the Insights for the Journey video series. In this conversation, Frederic and I explore a place where almost every leader can have a meaningful impact: helping people show up as their whole selves. We discuss how critical it is for leaders to lead the way in doing this — and how storytelling can be an important entry point. We look at some of the practical actions leaders can take to enter into a place of wholeness, including elevating beyond content, using everyday language, and integrating with the work at hand. Key Points As a leader, wholeness begins with you. Exploring wholeness yourself sets the stage for everyone else to be able to engage more fully. Rather than talking lots about wholeness, it’s often helpful just to begin modeling it. When you do, everyday language us useful to help others engage. Your personal history, the history of the organization, and the organization’s purpose are often helpful stories to share that open up a space for wholeness. You can turn any conversation into a moment of wholeness. One invitation for leaders is to stop talking about content and elevate the dialogue to “what’s happening” overall. Resist any temptation to disconnect wholeness from the work at hand. Bringing these together helps people to show up at work more authentically. Resources Mentioned Reinventing Organizations: A Guide to Creating Organizations Inspired by the Next Stage of Human Consciousness* by Frederic Laloux Reinventing Organizations: An Illustrated Invitation to Join the Conversation on Next-Stage Organizations* by Frederic Laloux Insights for the Journey video series by Frederic Laloux Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Stay Grounded, with Parker Palmer (episode 378) How to Be More Inclusive, with Stefanie Johnson (episode 508) The Path Towards Trusting Relationships, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 539) End Imposter Syndrome in Your Organization, with Jodi-Ann Burey (episode 556) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
579: How to Pitch Your Manager, with Tom Henschel
09-05-2022
579: How to Pitch Your Manager, with Tom Henschel
Tom Henschel: The Look & Sound of Leadership Tom Henschel of Essential Communications grooms senior leaders and executive teams. As an internationally recognized expert in the field of workplace communications and self-presentation, he has helped thousands of leaders achieve excellence through his work as an executive coach and his top-rated podcast, The Look & Sound of Leadership. In this conversation, Tom and I explore the sometimes awkward moment of needing to get buy-in from your manager on a next step, proposal, or funding. We detail three considerations and how attention to them can help you frame this conversation better. Plus, we share tactics such as making the business case, telling a story, and past interactions — in order to help you get forward movement. Key Points Three lenses of consideration are helpful when considering how to pitch you manager: purpose, preference, and protocol. When framing your purpose in making a pitch, it’s helpful to be able to change altitude. Consider “clicking out” on a map to frame the bigger picture. To be purposeful, make sure you are making the business case for whatever you are pitching. Anger and emotion can be sentinels that you might not have moved past thinking about it personally or framed the business context fully. Consider past interactions with your manager on how they prefer to receive information. The way you pitch them should begin with their preferences, not yours. Get intel in advance from other stakeholders, if practical. They can help you see the variables that might be clouding your judgement if you’re too close to the situation. Clearly frame the problem and examples of it. Consider strutting your pitch in the framework of The Want, The Obstacle, and The Resolution (see PDF below). Resources Mentioned Storytelling: A Three-Part Model by Tom Henschel (PDF download) Related Episodes How to Start Managing Up, with Tom Henschel (episode 433) The Way to Influence Executives, with Nancy Duarte (episode 450) The Way to Make Sense to Others, with Tom Henschel (episode 518) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
578: Leadership When Others Know More Than You, with Bonni Stachowiak
02-05-2022
578: Leadership When Others Know More Than You, with Bonni Stachowiak
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, Dean of Teaching and Learning and Professor of Business and Management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, she was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. Bonni is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Listener Questions Allison asked for resources on how to lead others who are more knowledgeable than you in the field of work. Everett wondered how he can navigate a situation where accents make it difficult to understand interview candidates. Stephen asked about motivating people independent of incentives. Resources Mentioned The Empowered Manager: Positive Political Skills at Work* by Peter Block Drive* by Daniel Pink Effective Delegation of Authority: A (Really) Short Book for New Managers About How to Delegate Work Using a Simple Delegation Process* by Hassan Osman The Coaching Habit* by Michael Bungay Stanier Humble Leadership* by Edgar Schein and Peter Schein HBO Max Presents Brené Brown: Atlas of the Heart Leading with Dignity: How to Create a Culture That Brings Out the Best in People* by Donna Hicks On the folly of rewarding A while hoping for B by Steven Kerr Related Episodes How to Improve Your Coaching Skills, with Tom Henschel (episode 190) How to Motivate People, with Dan Ariely (episode 282) The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 363) Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413) Start Finding Overlooked Talent, with Johnny Taylor, Jr. (episode 544) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
577: The Path Towards Joy in Your Career, with David Novak
25-04-2022
577: The Path Towards Joy in Your Career, with David Novak
David Novak: Take Charge of You David Novak is Co-Founder, retired Chairman and CEO of Yum! Brands, the world’s largest restaurant company with over 45,000 restaurants in more than 135 countries and territories. During his tenure as CEO, Yum! Brands became a global powerhouse, growing from $4 billion in revenue to over $32 billion. After retiring in 2016, he became Founder and CEO of David Novak Leadership, dedicated to developing leaders at every stage of life. David is also the host of the top-ranked podcast, How Leaders Lead and founder of the leadership development platform of the same name. An expert on leadership and recognition culture, David is also a New York Times bestselling author. His books include Taking People With You: The Only Way to Make Big Things Happen, O GREAT ONE! A Little Story About the Awesome Power of Recognition, and his latest book with Jason Goldsmith, Take Charge of You: How Self Coaching Can Transform Your Life and Career*. In this conversation, David and I discuss the importance of finding joy in our careers. David highlights several of the key questions that he utilizes when helping others to uncover how joy can show up their work. He encourages us to surface the single biggest thing that’s important right now in order to get immediate traction. Key Points Sometimes your best (and only) coach is yourself. Use joy as your destination finder. Find your joy blockers by asking yourself: what’s getting in the way of my joy? Your worst days often provide insight on this. Discover your joy builders by asking yourself: what would grow your joy personal and professionally? Your most memorable days are starting points for answers here. Your goal is to surface your single biggest thing. This changes over time, but ideally is only one thing, one at a time. That’s how you gain traction. Resources Mentioned Take Charge of You: How Self Coaching Can Transform Your Life and Career* by David Novak and Jason Goldsmith Interview Notes Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Find Your Calling, with Ken Coleman (episode 352) Align Your Work With Your Why, with Kwame Marfo (episode 542) How to Nail a Job Transition, with Sukhinder Singh Cassidy (episode 555) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.