The Alcohol Minimalist Podcast

Molly Watts

The Alcohol Minimalist podcast is dedicated to helping habit drinkers and adult children of alcoholics to change their drinking habits and create a peaceful relationship with alcohol: past, present and future. We are proof positive that you can break unbreakable habits and create a peaceful relationship with alcohol. Becoming an alcohol minimalist means: Choosing how to include alcohol in our lives following low-risk guidelines. Freedom from anxiety around alcohol use. Less alcohol without feeling deprived. Using the power of our own brains to overcome our past patterns and choose peace. The Alcohol Minimalist Podcast explores the science behind alcohol and analyzes physical and mental wellness to empower choice. You have the power to change your relationship with alcohol, you are not sick, broken and it's not your genes! This show is intended for educational purposes and does not constitute medical advice. If you are physically dependent on alcohol, please seek medical help to reduce your drinking. read less
EducationEducation

Episodes

Alcohol Core Belief #5: Alcohol Keeps Me Going
4d ago
Alcohol Core Belief #5: Alcohol Keeps Me Going
This week on the podcast  Alcohol Core Belief #5-Alcohol Keeps Me GoingHere are the five Alcohol Core Beliefs I see most often.  One is likely your dominant core belief but it’s absolutely possible (and probable) that you believe more than one of these core beliefs.  Alcohol Helps Me Relieve Stress. (Episode 158) Alcohol Makes Things More Fun. (Episode 159) Alcohol Creates Connection. (Episode 160) Alcohol Is My Reward. (Episode 161) Alcohol Keeps Me Going.  (Episode 163) Resource Mentioned:  Alcohol Core Belief Mind Map--Pick it up here.Drink? The New Science of Alcohol and Your HealthNew to the podcast? Download the Podcast Listening Guide.Ready to get started on changing your drinking habits?  Check out Just Start.Join my private FB group Alcohol Minimalists here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/changeyouralcoholhabitHas this podcast helped you? Please leave a review wherever you listen to podcasts! Follow me on Instagram: @AlcoholMinimalist Have you grabbed your free e-book, "Alcohol Truths: How Much is Safe?" Get it here.Low risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
Whole Brain Living: The Anatomy of Choice and the Four Characters that Drive Our Life with Dr. Jill Bolte-Taylor
Feb 14 2024
Whole Brain Living: The Anatomy of Choice and the Four Characters that Drive Our Life with Dr. Jill Bolte-Taylor
This week on the show I'm thrilled to share with you my conversation with Dr. Jill Bolte-Taylor. Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor is a Harvard-trained and published neuroanatomist whose research specialized in understanding how our brain creates our perception of reality. As irony would have it, in 1996 at the age of 37, Dr. Jill experienced a severe hemorrhage in the left hemisphere of her brain. On the afternoon of this rare form of stroke (AVM), she could not walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of her life. It took eight years for Dr. Jill to completely rebuild her brain to recover all physical, emotional, and thinking abilities.Learn more at www.drjilltaylor.comBooks written by Dr. Jill Bolte-Taylor:My Stroke of InsightWhole Brain Living: The Anatomy of Choice & The Four Characters that Drive Our LifeDr. Jill's Ted Talk New to the podcast? Download the Podcast Listening Guide.Ready to get started on changing your drinking habits?  Check out Just Start.Join my private FB group Alcohol Minimalists here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/changeyouralcoholhabitHas this podcast helped you? Please leave a review wherever you listen to podcasts! Follow me on Instagram: @AlcoholMinimalist Have you grabbed your free e-book, "Alcohol Truths: How Much is Safe?" Get it here.Low risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
Alcohol Core Belief #4: Alcohol Is My Reward
Feb 7 2024
Alcohol Core Belief #4: Alcohol Is My Reward
This week on the podcast the Alcohol Core Beliefs Series continues with Alcohol Core Belief #4-Alcohol is My RewardHere are the five Alcohol Core Beliefs I see most often.  One is likely your dominant core belief but it’s absolutely possible (and probable) that you believe more than one of these core beliefs.  Alcohol Helps Me Relieve Stress. (Episode #158) Alcohol Makes Things More Fun.  (Episode #159) Alcohol Creates Connection.   (Episode #160)Alcohol Is My Reward. Alcohol Keeps Me Going. Resource Mentioned:  Alcohol Core Belief Mind Map--Pick it up here.New to the podcast? Download the Podcast Listening Guide.Ready to get started on changing your drinking habits?  Check out Just Start.Join my private FB group Alcohol Minimalists here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/changeyouralcoholhabitHas this podcast helped you? Please leave a review wherever you listen to podcasts! Follow me on Instagram: @AlcoholMinimalist Have you grabbed your free e-book, "Alcohol Truths: How Much is Safe?" Get it here.Low risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
Dry January Series: Alcohol Core Belief #3-Alcohol Creates Connection
Jan 31 2024
Dry January Series: Alcohol Core Belief #3-Alcohol Creates Connection
This week on the podcast in the Dry January Series: Alcohol Core Belief #3-Alcohol Creates ConnectionHere are the five Alcohol Core Beliefs I see most often.  One is likely your dominant core belief but it’s absolutely possible (and probable) that you believe more than one of these core beliefs.  Alcohol Helps Me Relieve Stress. Alcohol Makes Things More Fun. Alcohol Creates Connection.Alcohol Is My Reward. Alcohol Keeps Me Going. Resource Mentioned:  Alcohol Core Belief Mind Map--Pick it up here.New to the podcast? Download the Podcast Listening Guide.Ready to get started on changing your drinking habits?  Check out Just Start.Join my private FB group Alcohol Minimalists here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/changeyouralcoholhabitHas this podcast helped you? Please leave a review wherever you listen to podcasts! Follow me on Instagram: @AlcoholMinimalist Have you grabbed your free e-book, "Alcohol Truths: How Much is Safe?" Get it here.Low risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
Dry January Series: Alcohol Core Belief #2-Alcohol Makes Things More FUN
Jan 24 2024
Dry January Series: Alcohol Core Belief #2-Alcohol Makes Things More FUN
This week on the podcast in the Dry January Series: Alcohol Core Belief #2-Alcohol Makes Things More FUN!Here are the five Alcohol Core Beliefs I see most often.  One is likely your dominant core belief but it’s absolutely possible (and probable) that you believe more than one of these core beliefs.  Alcohol Helps Me Relieve Stress. Alcohol Makes Things More Fun. Alcohol Creates Connection.Alcohol Is My Reward. Alcohol Keeps Me Going. Resource Mentioned:  Alcohol Core Belief Mind Map--Pick it up here.New to the podcast? Download the Podcast Listening Guide.Ready to get started on changing your drinking habits?  Check out Just Start.Join my private FB group Alcohol Minimalists here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/changeyouralcoholhabitHas this podcast helped you? Please leave a review wherever you listen to podcasts! Follow me on Instagram: @AlcoholMinimalist Have you grabbed your free e-book, "Alcohol Truths: How Much is Safe?" Get it here.Low risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
It's STILL Dryuary Mini-Series: Oh No it's Friday and I CAN'T Drink!
Jan 19 2024
It's STILL Dryuary Mini-Series: Oh No it's Friday and I CAN'T Drink!
It's the last episode in our Mini-Series and today we're talking about the weekend, and celebrations and what we make alcohol mean. If you're worried about sticking to your Dry January plans for the next two weekends, then this episode is for you! Resources Mentioned:Podcast Listening GuideAlcohol Core Beliefs MindmapRecovery & Reflection WorksheetAlcohol Minimalists Facebook GroupLearn more about how I work with people here: www.mollywatts.com/workwithmeOr if you want to have a conversation, email me molly@mollywatts.comLow risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
It's STILL Dryuary Mini-Series: If You've Already Drank Off Plan
Jan 18 2024
It's STILL Dryuary Mini-Series: If You've Already Drank Off Plan
Here's the 4th in our STILL DRYUARY mini-series and today I'm talking all about how we approach off-plan drinking. This is the #1 skill you should build if you're interested in creating sustainable change beyond Dry January.We focus on compassion and curiosity to observe our own thinking and understand what's driving our desire to drink off-plan. Resource:  Recovery & Reflection Worksheet Alcohol Minimalists Facebook GroupLearn more about how I work with people here: www.mollywatts.com/workwithmeOr if you want to have a conversation, email me molly@mollywatts.comLow risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
It's STILL Dryuary Mini-Series: When Everyone Around You is Drinking
Jan 17 2024
It's STILL Dryuary Mini-Series: When Everyone Around You is Drinking
Back for more of It's STILL DRYUARY mini-series-day three. Today I'm talking about the pressure you might feel when everyone around you is drinking alcohol and you're not. This is more than just simple peer pressure, it's all about managing our minds.Are you looking for some other folks who are working on their drinking habits, committed to science and learning what's fueling the desire to drink?  Check out my the Alcohol Minimalist private Facebook group. It's another great free resource.  Learn more about how I work with people here: www.mollywatts.com/workwithmeOr if you want to have a conversation, email me molly@mollywatts.comLow risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
It's STILL DRYUARY Mini-Series: Surviving the Witching Hour
Jan 16 2024
It's STILL DRYUARY Mini-Series: Surviving the Witching Hour
Back for more of It's STILL DRYUARY mini-series with some help to navigate the witching hour. Whether is's an ingrained habit or responding to the stress of your life, the witching hour is that time of day that seems to trip you up on a regular basis.I'm talking about the why and how we can make the witching hour easier. Resources mentioned:  PB&J Tool Learn more about how I work with people here: www.mollywatts.com/workwithmeOr if you want to have a conversation, email me molly@mollywatts.comLow risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
It's STILL DRYUARY Mini-Series: You're Not Alone if this feels HARD
Jan 15 2024
It's STILL DRYUARY Mini-Series: You're Not Alone if this feels HARD
Welcome to It's STILL DRYUARY! This week-long mini-series is designed to help support you through the "messy middle" of whatever dry, dryish or damp January plan you have in place. A new episode every day and today we're starting with "You're Not Alone if this feels HARD". Resources mentioned: Podcast Listening GuideAlcohol Core Belief MindmapLearn more about how I work with people here: www.mollywatts.com/workwithmeOr if you want to have a conversation, email me molly@mollywatts.comLow risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
Dry January Series: Understanding Your ACB's (Alcohol Core Beliefs)
Jan 10 2024
Dry January Series: Understanding Your ACB's (Alcohol Core Beliefs)
This week on the podcast in the Dry January Series: Understanding Your ACB's  (Alcohol Core Beliefs)Here are the five Alcohol Core Beliefs I see most often.  One is likely your dominant core belief but it’s absolutely possible (and probable) that you believe more than one of these core beliefs.  Alcohol Helps Me Relieve Stress. Alcohol Makes Things More Fun. Alcohol Creates Connection.Alcohol Is My Reward. Alcohol Keeps Me Going. Resource Mentioned:  Alcohol Core Belief Mind Map--Pick it up here.New to the podcast? Download the Podcast Listening Guide.Ready to get started on changing your drinking habits?  Check out Just Start.Join my private FB group Alcohol Minimalists here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/changeyouralcoholhabitHas this podcast helped you? Please leave a review wherever you listen to podcasts! Follow me on Instagram: @AlcoholMinimalist Have you grabbed your free e-book, "Alcohol Truths: How Much is Safe?" Get it here.Low risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
Dry January Series: 5 Questions to Ask Yourself About Alcohol & Your Health
Jan 3 2024
Dry January Series: 5 Questions to Ask Yourself About Alcohol & Your Health
This week on the podcast I'm diving into the health benefits of Dry January, by exploring some of the questions that you may not ask yourself regularly about alcohol. 1) Do you have any preexisting conditions that are exacerbated by drinking? This can include diabetes, liver disease, hypertension, epilepsy, and more.  2) Are you taking any medications that are less effective because of your alcohol consumption or that pose dangerous side effects when mixed with alcohol? This can include blood pressure medications, insulin, antibiotics, and various psychiatric medications.3) How does alcohol interfere with your ability to take care of your physical health? For example, is it affecting your skin, teeth, digestion, diet, or exercise habits?4) What is your cancer, Alzheimer’s, and stroke risk? Have you or anyone else in your family been diagnosed with these types of conditions, which makes drinking more likely to negatively impact you?5) How is alcohol affecting your sleep? Do you find that you are waking frequently at night? Chronically tired in the morning? New to the podcast? Download the Podcast Listening Guide.Ready to get started on changing your drinking habits?  Check out Just Start.Want to get involved in Dryuary?  Check out www.Dryuary.orgJoin my private FB group Alcohol Minimalists here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/changeyouralcoholhabitHas this podcast helped you? Please leave a review wherever you listen to podcasts! Follow me on Instagram: @AlcoholMinimalist Have you grabbed your free e-book, "Alcohol Truths: How Much is Safe?" Get it here.Low risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
Alcohol & Emotional Resilience with Alice Kearney
Dec 27 2023
Alcohol & Emotional Resilience with Alice Kearney
This week on the podcast I'm talking to Alice Kearney. Alice is one of my students who is also an art therapist, and mental health counselor. We are talking all about emotional resilience and how lacking it, often leads to people using alcohol as a coping mechanism.  We're also talking about parenting and why teaching our children emotional resilience AND how to have a healthy relationship with alcohol is possible. Alice has created a product that helps parents teach kids to become more emotionally reslient called The Bounce Box.  Check it out here! New to the podcast? Download the Podcast Listening Guide.Ready to get started on changing your drinking habits?  Check out Just Start.Want to get involved in Dryuary?  Check out www.Dryuary.orgJoin my private FB group Alcohol Minimalists here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/changeyouralcoholhabitHas this podcast helped you? Please leave a review wherever you listen to podcasts! Follow me on Instagram: @AlcoholMinimalist Have you grabbed your free e-book, "Alcohol Truths: How Much is Safe?" Get it here.Low risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
Alcohol Minimalist Success Stories: Jodi
Dec 20 2023
Alcohol Minimalist Success Stories: Jodi
This week on the podcast I'm talking to Jodi. Jodi is an Alcohol Minimalist success story!Listen in as we talk about what she's learned in terms of her drinking and becoming a better thinker.Want to see that sky picture from Oregon? It's here. New to the podcast? Download the Podcast Listening Guide.Ready to get started on changing your drinking habits?  Check out Just Start.Want to get involved in Dryuary?  Check out www.Dryuary.orgJoin my private FB group Alcohol Minimalists here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/changeyouralcoholhabitHas this podcast helped you? Please leave a review wherever you listen to podcasts! Follow me on Instagram: @AlcoholMinimalist Have you grabbed your free e-book, "Alcohol Truths: How Much is Safe?" Get it here.Low risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
Mindful Drinking 2.0 with Sunnyside Co-Founder Ian Andersen
Dec 13 2023
Mindful Drinking 2.0 with Sunnyside Co-Founder Ian Andersen
This week on the podcast, I'm talking to Sunnyside Chief Growth Officer and Co-Founder, Ian Andersen. He's sharing some of the exciting accomplishments that Sunnyside, a mindful drinking app, has achieved in the last 18 months. He's also breaking some fun news about Dryish January. Check out Sunnyside at www.sunnyside.co. New to the podcast? Download the Podcast Listening Guide.Ready to get started on changing your drinking habits?  Check out Just Start.Want to get involved in Dryuary?  Check out www.Dryuary.orgJoin my private FB group Alcohol Minimalists here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/changeyouralcoholhabitHas this podcast helped you? Please leave a review wherever you listen to podcasts! Follow me on Instagram: @AlcoholMinimalist Have you grabbed your free e-book, "Alcohol Truths: How Much is Safe?" Get it here.Low risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
Wine Witch on Fire with Natalie MacLean
Dec 6 2023
Wine Witch on Fire with Natalie MacLean
This week on the show I'm joined by wine writer, sommelier and award-winning author, Natalie MacLean. We're talking all about Natalie's newest book Wine Witch on Fire: Rising from the Ashes of Divorce, Defamation and Drinking Too Much.Whether you're someone who loves wine but wants to cut back, or you've gone through struggles of your own and used alcohol to cope--this conversation will be inspiring and informative. You can learn more about Natalie or pick up the book here: www.WineWitchonFire.comYou can get a free companion guide to the book here: www.WineWitchonFire.com/GuideRecommendations from Natalie on low or no alcohol wines: Feel Free Sparkling Rosé, from Cox Creek Cellars, offers aromas of juicy field strawberries to pair with oven-roasted turkey. 0.5% alcohol | 90 points | $21.95Cupcake Lighthearted Rosé, California, is bursting with ripe raspberries to match your sweet potatoes. 8% alcohol | 88 points | $12.45Nozeco Alcohol-Free Sparkling, France, with white peach and floral notes, is perfect for creamed corn. 0.01% alcohol | 88 points | $10.95Reif Riesling, Niagara, has mouth-watering flavours of lemon and lime to brighten brussels sprouts with bacon. 12% alcohol | 89 points | $14.95 Villa Wolf Pinot Noir, Germany, features seductive hints of fleshy ripe cherries that will dance with cranberry sauce. 12% alcohol | 88 points | $17.95For more wine picks and info about Natalie MacLean's book, visit www.nataliemaclean.com. Join my private FB group Alcohol Minimalists here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/changeyouralcoholhabitLow risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
Redefining Your Drinking: Molly Watts on the Done with Dieting Podcast
Nov 29 2023
Redefining Your Drinking: Molly Watts on the Done with Dieting Podcast
This week I'm sharing a recent episode that I recorded with Elizabeth Sherman on the Done with Dieting Podcast. We dive into neurochemistry, anxiety, FOMO and more.  Elizabeth works with midlife women who want to look and feel their best but are tired of all the diet industry tactics. Learn more here: https://elizabethsherman.com/   Check out the 8 Habits Healthy People Do! New to the podcast? Download the Podcast Listening Guide.Ready to get started on changing your drinking habits?  Check out Just Start.Join my private FB group Alcohol Minimalists here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/changeyouralcoholhabitHas this podcast helped you? Please leave a review wherever you listen to podcasts! Follow me on Instagram: @AlcoholMinimalist Have you grabbed your free e-book, "Alcohol Truths: How Much is Safe?" Get it here.Low risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
Undoing the Urge to Overdrink
Nov 22 2023
Undoing the Urge to Overdrink
This week I'm talking about interrupting the urge cycle to undo your urge to overdrink. There are multiple points inside the urge cycle that we need to learn to interrupt the process.I'm talking about after the fact, before you start overdrinking at all and when you've started and have the option to stop "during the binge". All of these are important in learning how to overdrink less.Happy Thanksgiving!  New to the podcast? Download the Podcast Listening Guide.Come check out Making Peace with Alcohol! my new online group coaching program and community.Join my private FB group Alcohol Minimalists here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/changeyouralcoholhabitHas this podcast helped you? Please leave a review wherever you listen to podcasts! Follow me on Instagram: @AlcoholMinimalist Have you grabbed your free e-book, "Alcohol Truths: How Much is Safe?" Get it here.Low risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
Change How You Think, Change How You Drink: Molly Watts on the Brain Shaman Podcast
Nov 15 2023
Change How You Think, Change How You Drink: Molly Watts on the Brain Shaman Podcast
This week on the podcast I'm sharing a guest episode I recorded with Michael Waite on the Brain Shaman podcast. You can listen to more Brain Shaman here.Lots of great information on alcohol and brain chemistry, the different areas of brain organization, and how to manage your mind to create a different relationship with alcohol.  New to the podcast? Download the Podcast Listening Guide.Ready to get started on changing your drinking habits?  Check out Just Start. Join my private FB group Alcohol Minimalists here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/changeyouralcoholhabitHas this podcast helped you? Please leave a review wherever you listen to podcasts! Follow me on Instagram: @AlcoholMinimalist Have you grabbed your free e-book, "Alcohol Truths: How Much is Safe?" Get it here.Low risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★
Revisting: Overdrinking Neuroscience, Numbers, & Note to Self
Nov 8 2023
Revisting: Overdrinking Neuroscience, Numbers, & Note to Self
This week on the podcast, I'm talking about the idea of a "No Binge November". Lots of information on the definition of bingeing and then we're revisiting an episode from last year talking all about overdrinking by the numbers.Resource mentioned: Is Moderation Possible by Rachel Hart New to the podcast? Download the Podcast Listening Guide.Come check out Making Peace with Alcohol! my new online group coaching program and community.Join my private FB group Alcohol Minimalists here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/changeyouralcoholhabitHas this podcast helped you? Please leave a review wherever you listen to podcasts! Follow me on Instagram: @AlcoholMinimalist Have you grabbed your free e-book, "Alcohol Truths: How Much is Safe?" Get it here.Low risk drinking guidelines from the NIAAA:Healthy men under 65:No more than 4 drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks per week.Healthy women (all ages) and healthy men 65 and older:No more than 3 drinks in one day and no more than 7 drinks per week.One drink is defined as 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. So remember that a mixed drink or full glass of wine are probably more than one drink.Abstinence from alcoholAbstinence from alcohol is the best choice for people who take medication(s) that interact with alcohol, have health conditions that could be exacerbated by alcohol (e.g. liver disease), are pregnant or may become pregnant or have had a problem with alcohol or another substance in the past.Benefits of “low-risk” drinkingFollowing these guidelines reduces the risk of health problems such as cancer, liver disease, reduced immunity, ulcers, sleep problems, complications of existing conditions, and more. It also reduces the risk of depression, social problems, and difficulties at school or work.If you' are unsure about whether or not you have alcohol use disorder, please visit the NIAAA for more information. ★ Support this podcast ★