Inside The Vatican

America Media

Each week, Colleen Dulle goes behind the headlines of the biggest Vatican news stories with America’s Rome correspondent Gerard O’Connell. They'll break down complicated news stories that have a whole lot of history behind them in an understandable, engaging way. Colleen and Gerard will give you the inside scoop on what people inside the Vatican are thinking, saying—and planning.

The Vatican responds to overturning of Roe v Wade, Sant'Egidio continues peacebuilding in South Sudan
30-06-2022
The Vatican responds to overturning of Roe v Wade, Sant'Egidio continues peacebuilding in South Sudan
Pope Francis was set to visit the Democratic Republic of the Congo and South Sudan this week, July 2-9, before his doctors advised against making the trip. But the trip’s postponement doesn’t mean that the Catholic Church’s work for peace in the conflict-torn country is on pause. This week on “Inside the Vatican,” host Colleen Dulle speaks with Sant’Egidio’s Elizabeth Boyle about the lay group’s efforts to foster peace and friendship in South Sudan. Elizabeth explains the most important facts about the conflict, and what Sant’Egidio’s work to foster peace looks like. She also gives an update on what effect the postponement has had in the country. Also in this episode, Colleen gives a brief update on the Vatican’s two responses to the overturning of Roe v. Wade by the U.S. Supreme Court. While the Vatican welcomed the decision, it emphasized the importance of protecting life through caring for those in need, calling for universal healthcare, and fighting gun violence. This is our last episode before our summer hiatus, but we have one last request before we go: Please help us improve Inside the Vatican by responding to our listener survey! Your feedback will help us return even stronger in September. Links from the show: On Roe v. Wade: Vatican: After Roe v. Wade, it’s time for widespread pro-life work Vatican editorial: For life, always Pontifical Academy for Life response to U.S. Supreme Court decision On South Sudan: Pope Francis apologizes for canceling trips to Congo and South Sudan Community of Sant’Egidio World Food Programme U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization International Committee of the Red Cross Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
How Catholic marriage prep could be changing
23-06-2022
How Catholic marriage prep could be changing
The World Meeting of Families is happening in Rome this week, and there has been much family-related news out of the Vatican recently. The Vatican has issued new guidance on marriage preparation, saying couples should go through a yearlong program before getting married in the church, and the Vatican’s office of Laity, Family and Life has seen a few big reforms. To learn more about these stories, America Vatican correspondent Gerard O’Connell recently interviewed Cardinal Kevin Farrell, prefect for the Vatican’s Dicastery for Laity, Family and Life. This week on “Inside the Vatican,” Gerry and host Colleen Dulle recap the Vatican’s recent family-related news through the lens of Gerry’s interview with Cardinal Farrell. Two reforms Cardinal Farrell has made: First, he has increased the share of lay people working in his office. Today, only four of the office’s almost 40 employees are priests, and Cardinal Farrell told Gerry he believes he could be the last cleric to head the office. Second, he established term limits for members of lay movements like Sant’Egidio and the Focolare. (If you don’t know what those are, don’t worry; we explain it all on this week’s show.) Together the Vatican’s updates to formation for married couples, families and members of lay movements are aimed at realizing Pope Francis’ vision of a dynamic church in which older people teach and share leadership with younger people, and in which no one’s pastoral needs are overlooked. Lastly, we’d love your feedback on the show! Please take this brief 2022 ITV Listener Survey and let us know what you’d like to hear in future episodes! Links from the show: Cardinal Farrell: ‘I believe I could be the last cleric in charge of this dicastery’ Citing ‘superficial’ marriage prep, Pope Francis calls for yearlong program for engaged couples Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Pope Francis: Don’t reduce the Ukraine war to ‘good guys and bad guys’
16-06-2022
Pope Francis: Don’t reduce the Ukraine war to ‘good guys and bad guys’
Pope Francis gave a wide-ranging interview to the editors of the European Jesuit journals—America’s across-the-pond counterparts—that was published this week. In the interview, Pope Francis takes on accusations that he is “pro-Putin” and argues that a failure to accept the Second Vatican Council is at the heart of church polarization today. On “Inside the Vatican” this week, host Colleen Dulle and veteran Vatican correspondent Gerard O’Connell unpack the pope’s interview. Speaking about the war in Ukraine, Pope Francis told the editors that World War III had been declared. But what does this mean? Colleen and Gerry examine the pope’s rhetorical shift from describing a third world war fought “piecemeal” to a “declared” world war. In the second half of the show, Gerry and Colleen look at the pope’s comments on “restorationism,” which Gerry defines as “going back to the past. You don’t want the new things; you want things as they were before.” Pope Francis commented to the European editors that there are many such people in the United States, who want to return to a pre-Vatican II era without having ever accepted the council’s reforms. “Restorationism,” the pope said, “has come to gag the Council.” Lastly, the hosts discuss the postponement of Pope Francis’ scheduled trip to the Democratic Republic of the Congo and South Sudan, and what effects the postponement has for people in those countries who were expecting the pope. Lastly, we’d love your feedback on the show! Please take this brief 2022 ITV Listener Survey and let us know what you’d like to hear in future episodes! Links from the show: Pope Francis: ‘World War III has been declared.’ Pope Francis says traditionalist Catholics are ‘gagging’ the reforms of Vatican II Interview: Pope Francis in Conversation with the Editors of European Jesuit Journals Pope Francis postpones July trip to Africa due to knee troubles Pope Francis apologizes for canceling trips to Congo and South Sudan Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Does Pope Francis have plans to resign soon?
09-06-2022
Does Pope Francis have plans to resign soon?
Pope Francis’ increasing mobility woes were already leading some to speculate that another papal resignation might soon be on the horizon.  [Listen and subscribe to Inside the Vatican on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.] “But then Francis pulls a kind of a rabbit out of the hat,” America Vatican correspondent and “Inside the Vatican” host Gerard O’Connell tells co-host Colleen Dulle in this episode of “Inside the Vatican.”  On June 4, the Vatican announced that in the two days between the making of new cardinals in August and the unprecedented meeting of the world’s cardinals, Pope Francis would leave Rome for the central Italian city of L’Aquila, where he would, among other things, visit the tomb of Celestine V, who was the first pope to resign.  This announcement might have gone unnoticed had it not been that Celestine V was the first pope to resign, and that Benedict XVI had made a pilgrimage to the same pope’s tomb four years before announcing his resignation from the chair of Peter. It was this, Gerry says, “that provided ammunition for the guns of speculation.” And while neither Gerry nor Colleen believes a papal resignation is imminent, on this episode of “Inside the Vatican” they consider the reasons to heed, or not, the rumors that Pope Francis will soon follow in the footsteps of Benedict XVI and Celestine V. Lastly, we’d love your feedback on the show! Please take this brief 2022 ITV Listener Survey and let us know what you’d like to hear in future episodes! Links from the show: Will Pope Francis resign? Here are some reasons to believe it—and some to be skeptical What happens if a pope resigns? A Historic Departure: Reflections on Benedict XVI’s surprise decision to resign Should there be a pope emeritus? What Pope Benedict’s retirement says about future former popes Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Pope Francis appoints new cardinals ‘from the ends of the earth’
03-06-2022
Pope Francis appoints new cardinals ‘from the ends of the earth’
On Sunday, May 29, Pope Francis announced he would create 21 new cardinals this year, including American Bishop Robert McElroy of San Diego and several other surprise choices. 16 of the new cardinals are under 80 and will be able to vote in a conclave, meaning Pope Francis has now appointed just under two-thirds of the current cardinal-electors. As of December, that number will rise to 69 percent. This week on “Inside the Vatican,” host Colleen Dulle and veteran Vatican correspondent Gerard O’Connel discuss some of Pope Francis’ most interesting picks for the college of cardinals. He has traditionally passed over so-called “cardinalatial sees,” big cities where the bishop has often been named a cardinal, in favor of bishops from underrepresented communities. This idea of Francis choosing the person over the place was evident in the case of the sole American bishop who was named a cardinal-designate this weekend: Bishop Robert McElroy of San Diego. Bishop McElroy, one of the leading intellectuals in the U.S. hierarchy, has been named while the bishops of two larger cities, Archbishop Gomez in Los Angeles and Archbishop Cordileone in San Francisco, were not. Gerry and Colleen discuss the message this appointment sends to the U.S. church, while dispelling speculation that Bishop McElroy was appointed in direct response to Archbishop Cordileone’s decision to bar U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi from receiving communion. Then, Colleen and Gerry turn their focus to the global stage. Pope Francis named the first cardinal from the Dalit, or “untouchable,” caste in India. The hosts examine what effect this will have on India’s leadership, which sees Christianity as a threat to the caste system. Gerry also tells the story behind Cardinal-designate Peter Ebere Okpaleke, a Nigerian prelate who was once rejected by the priests of a diocese for belonging to a different ethnic group. Links from the show: Pope Francis names 21 new cardinals, including Bishop Robert McElroy of San Diego Bishop McElroy: Pope Francis and Vatican II give us a road map for the synodal process Voting Catholic: How to vote Catholic with Bishop Robert McElroy Bishop McElroy: When bishops increase barriers to Communion, we are not being the pastors Pope Francis called us to be. The Election of Pope Francis: An Inside Account of the Conclave That Changed History by Gerard O’Connell Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Archbishop Cordileone bans Nancy Pelosi from communion. Will Pope Francis intervene?
26-05-2022
Archbishop Cordileone bans Nancy Pelosi from communion. Will Pope Francis intervene?
Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone of San Francisco announced Friday, May 20, that he would bar Nancy Pelosi, the speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, from receiving holy communion in his diocese, which is also Ms. Pelosi’s home diocese.  His decision comes after a lengthy and polarized debate over the past two years among U.S. bishops over whether to mandate a blanket ban on pro-choice politicians receiving communion. Ultimately, and after direct intervention from the Vatican, the U.S. bishops decided not to pursue a joint pastoral teaching on the matter. The decision to deny communion would remain with each individual bishop. On “Inside the Vatican” this week, host Colleen Dulle asks Gerald O’Connell, America Vatican correspondent, how Archbishop Cordileone’s statement has been received at the Vatican and whether the Vatican will intervene..   After the break, we look into a change Pope Francis made to canon law which would open leadership positions in priestly religious orders to members who are lay brothers, not priests. We’ll talk about what effects this could have going forward. [Listen and subscribe to Inside the Vatican on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.] Links from the show: Gloria Purvis Podcast: Archbishop Cordileone explains why he will bar Nancy Pelosi from Communion Behind the Story Video: Archbishop Cordileone declares Nancy Pelosi cannot receive Communion Archbishop bars Nancy Pelosi from Communion in her home diocese, citing ‘aggressive’ defense of abortion rights Nancy Pelosi responds to being barred from Communion: I respect pro-life views but not ‘foisting them onto others’ Deep Dive: What you need to know about the Communion Wars in the U.S. Church Pope Francis: ‘I have never denied Communion to anyone. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Putin’s “holy war” threatens Christian unity
12-05-2022
Putin’s “holy war” threatens Christian unity
Despite his hopes to declare victory over Ukraine May 9, Russian president Vladimir Putin instead used his speech that day to rehash his complaint that the West and NATO had forced him to send troops into Ukraine. More surprising was that Pope Francis echoed Putin’s sentiments in an interview that earned him condemnation by the Wall Street Journal editorial board.  This week on “Inside the Vatican,” veteran Vatican correspondent Gerard O’Connell and host Colleen Dulle unpack the pope’s comments. They also discuss the religious implications of the Russia-Ukraine war and how it threatens work towards Christian unity. After that, the two discuss why the Vatican postponed Pope Francis’ scheduled trip to Lebanon before giving an update on Cardinal Becciu’s testimony at what’s been called the Vatican’s “trial of the century.” In a highly unusual move, Cardinal Becciu revealed confidential information about how much the Vatican was willing to spend to ransom a kidnapped nun. Gerry explains how this revelation could put the safety of church workers around the world at risk. Links from the show: Pope Francis: ‘I am ready to go to Moscow’ to end the war in Ukraine What critics of Pope Francis’ NATO comments don’t understand about Vatican diplomacy Pope Francis approved spending 1 million euros to free nun kidnapped by Al-Qaeda-linked militants Podcast: The Vatican’s $200 million London real estate scandal, explained Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Why the pope wants to visit Russia before Ukraine
05-05-2022
Why the pope wants to visit Russia before Ukraine
In a new interview with the Italian daily newspaper Corriere della Sera, Pope Francis revealed some of the details of his communications with Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill and Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orban. He also reflected on why he chose to appeal publicly to the Russian ambassador to the Holy See to end the war, rather than communicate privately with Russian President Vladimir Putin. This week on “Inside the Vatican,” veteran Vatican correspondent Gerard O’Connell and host Colleen Dulle dig into the pope’s interview—and why he says he is pessimistic about the possibility of peace. “There are none so deaf as those who do not want to hear,” Gerry says on this week’s show. “And it seems at this moment that the Kremlin does not want to listen to peace talk. They want victory; they want taking of territory…even if…as the Pope said, you put a flag on rubble and call it victory.” Also on the show, Colleen gives an update on Pope Francis’ request that the Pontifical Council for the Protection of Minors produce an annual report on, in Francis’ words, “what the church is doing to protect minors and what needs to change.” Links from the show: Pope Francis: ‘I am ready to go to Moscow’ to end the war in Ukraine There are plenty of good reasons for Pope Francis not to go to Ukraine. Futility is not one of them. Pope Francis asks the church to produce annual audit on sexual abuse Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Decoding papal diplomacy with a former ambassador to Russia and the Holy See
28-04-2022
Decoding papal diplomacy with a former ambassador to Russia and the Holy See
Pope Francis will not visit Kyiv as hoped and has suspended his meeting with Patriarch Kirill, the leader of the Russian Orthodox Church, planned for July in Jerusalem. In an interview with La Nación, an Argentine daily newspaper, published on April 21, the pope said he had made the decision to suspend his meeting with Kirill because the Holy See’s diplomatic arm advised him that “a reunion between the two at this time could give rise to much confusion.” This week on “Inside The Vatican,” co-producer Ricardo da Silva, S.J., interviews Anne Leahy, who once served as the Canadian ambassador to Russia and later to the Holy See, to understand Pope Francis and the Vatican in its relations with Russia. As a career diplomat, Ms. Leahy has unique insight into the diplomatic dilemmas facing the pope at this time, in his desire to negotiate peace between two nations at war and end the wanton bloodshed in Ukraine, and in his decision not to name and shame the aggressor of this war.  “What is happening on the ground right now is a very delicate exercise that the Holy See finds itself in,” Ms. Leahy says. “Do you really think that naming President Putin is going to shame him at this point?” The former ambassador also shares personal experiences of her time in Russia and the Vatican, which have points “quite in common between administrations.”  “It’s a lot better now under Pope Francis, in terms of transparency and in terms of access to information, in a way,” she says. At the top of the show, Ricardo joins regular “Inside the Vatican” host Colleen Dulle to discuss the major news coming out of the Vatican this past week. They share their takeaways from the pope’s interview and the ongoing troubles with his knee injury, which has once again forced him to stop his regular liturgies and work schedule at the Vatican. Support America Media through a digital subscription. Links from the show: Pope Francis suspends planned meeting with Russia’s Patriarch Kirill and explains why he hasn’t visited Kyiv There are plenty of good reasons for Pope Francis not to go to Ukraine. Futility is not one of them. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Vatican’s diplomatic tightrope in Ukraine
22-04-2022
The Vatican’s diplomatic tightrope in Ukraine
Catholics worldwide celebrated Holy Week as the latest Russian offensive began in Ukraine. In this episode of Inside the Vatican, host Colleen Dulle and veteran Vatican correspondent Gerard O’Connell examine how the war was addressed in the Vatican’s Holy Week services. Gerry and Colleen explain the controversy that led to one of the Stations of the Cross reflections, which was co-written by a Russian and Ukrainian woman, being changed before the service. They also review how the pope’s physical health looked, after the pope did not celebrate the Easter Vigil as was scheduled. In the second half of the show, Colleen and Gerry turn to Vatican diplomacy, giving an overview of what diplomatic and religious relationships the Vatican has to keep in mind as it weighs its response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and the possibility of a papal visit to Kyiv. “If Russia isn't listening,” Colleen asks, “Does the Pope delivering this peace message matter?” Links from the show: A Ukrainian and a Russian were invited to lead the Vatican’s Via Crucis. Ukraine wants Pope Francis to reconsider. Pope Francis calls for an Easter truce in Ukraine, leading to ‘peace through a true negotiation’ In Easter Message, Pope Francis calls for peace in Ukraine and world: ‘Peace is a duty; peace is everyone’s responsibility!’ Interview: Former U.S.-Vatican ambassador says Pope Francis going to Ukraine is ‘advisable, for sure.’ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Pope Francis apologizes to Indigenous residential school survivors
07-04-2022
Pope Francis apologizes to Indigenous residential school survivors
Last week, Pope Francis apologized to representatives of the First Nations, Métis and Inuit people for the Catholic Church’s role in Canada’s residential schools that suppressed Indigenous culture and were often the site of abuse. This week on “Inside the Vatican,” host Colleen Dulle and Vatican correspondent Gerard O’Connell discuss what the apology meant to Indigenous leaders. Pope Francis also told the Indigenous delegations that he hopes to visit Canada this summer, in addition to his already-announced trips to the Democratic Republic of the Congo and South Sudan in July, and possible trips to Ukraine and Lebanon before that. But this past weekend, the pope struggled to move around during his trip to Malta April 2-3. On the podcast, Gerry recounts the difficulty Pope Francis has had with his knee in Malta and the questions it raises about the impending Holy Week ceremonies and future papal trips. “Obviously they will have to tailor-make the events for him just as they did for the last years of John Paul II,” Gerry said. “They devised ways of reducing the stress and making mobility more easy.” Colleen and Gerry also discuss Pope Francis’ revelation that he closely follows the news Elisabetta Piqué—Gerry’s wife and an Argentine war correspondent—has been reporting from Ukraine, calling her a few times a week for updates. “We never said anything publicly. It was he who spilled the beans!” Gerry says. “I think it really shows the pope doesn't just work by ordinary, official channels to get his information. He doesn’t depend on the Curia or on ambassadors or governments or nuncios. He also goes out to ordinary people whose judgment he trusts and whom he knows are in touch with the reality.” Links from the show: Pope Francis visits Malta this weekend. Here’s what to expect. Arriving in Malta, Pope Francis warns of a new Cold War and urges attention to refugees Read Pope Francis’ address to Maltese authorities, civil society and diplomatic corps Pope Francis last spoke to Putin before New Year’s, is willing to visit Kyiv but that is ‘up in the air’ Pope Francis is wise to not call out Putin directly. Here’s why. Pope Francis to visit Lebanon in June during economic crisis, country’s president says Pope Francis: The blood of innocent victims massacred in Bucha ‘cries out to heaven’ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Roundtable: Indigenous survivors of abuse in Canada's residential schools tell their stories to Pope Francis.
31-03-2022
Roundtable: Indigenous survivors of abuse in Canada's residential schools tell their stories to Pope Francis.
This week, Pope Francis is meeting with leaders of the First Nations, Metis, and Inuit people who have traveled to Rome from Canada. They want to tell the pope about their experiences at the state-funded, church-run residential schools that took indigenous children from their communities in an effort to assimilate them to the dominant Canadian culture. Last year, the country and the church were shocked by the discovery of hundreds of human remains that were found buried on the sites of former residential schools. It’s the hope of Indigenous leaders that Pope Francis will travel to Canada this year to apologize for the church’s role in the schools and for the abuse that was perpetrated there. But this work is part of a larger process of finding truth and reconciliation between indigenous people and the church in Canada, that will take much more than a papal apology. So this week, we’re bringing you an interview with six people from the truth and reconciliation committee that was established within the Archdiocese of Regina in Saskatchewan to uncover the truth of what happened at residential schools in their area and foster a relationship of healing and dialogue, led by Indigenous people.  Our guests include two residential school survivors, May Desnomin and Susan Beaudin, along with Bishop Donald Bolen, Joanna Laundry, Deacon Eric Gurash, and Lisa Polk. This week on Inside the Vatican, they tell their stories—and explain their hopes for what healing can look like when the church and indigenous people can face the truth together. After that, veteran Vatican reporter Gerard O’Connell gives an update from Rome, where the meetings between the pope and the Canadian delegations are already in full swing. Links from the show: The Indigenous people of Canada want an apology from Pope Francis The Canadian church’s leadership is changing. What could it mean for reconciliation with Indigenous peoples? Inside Day 1 of the historic encounter between Pope Francis and Canada’s Indigenous communities What does Our Lady of Fátima have to do with Russia and Ukraine? Pope Francis: Consecrating Russia and Ukraine to Mary is ‘not a magic formula but a spiritual act.’ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Could Pope Francis visit Ukraine?
17-03-2022
Could Pope Francis visit Ukraine?
As Russian airstrikes on Ukraine continue and its ground efforts meet fierce resistance from the Ukrainian army, the Vatican is stepping up its efforts for peace. On this episode of “Inside the Vatican,” veteran Vatican correspondent Gerard O’Connell and host Colleen Dulle discuss Pope Francis’ latest moves, including Vatican secretary of state Cardinal Pietro Parolin’s call with the Russian foreign minister, Cardinals Michael Czerny and Konrad Krajewski’s mission to Ukrainian refugees, the pope’s call to “Stop this massacre,” and the chance of a papal visit to Kyiv.  Amid all these efforts, Colleen asks Gerry: Is the diplomatic solution the Vatican is advocating really possible? In the second part of the show, Gerry tells the story of Sr. Lucia Caram, the heroic nun who drove 4,000 miles to Ukraine and back to rescue six Ukrainian refugees. Find the latest updates on the Vatican’s anti-war efforts at   Links from the show: Cardinal Krajewski in Ukraine: ‘Faith can move mountains, not to mention a stupid war.’ Meet Sister Lucía Caram, the nun who drove 4,000 miles in a weekend to save Ukrainian refugees Inside Cardinal Czerny’s visit to Ukraine Cardinal Parolin calls for an immediate ceasefire in Ukraine: ‘Peace is not a utopia.’ Pope Francis on Ukraine: ‘Stop this massacre’ Ukraine mayor invites Pope Francis to visit Kyiv, asking ‘the world’s spiritual leaders to take a stand’ Read: Pope Francis prays for Ukraine Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Deep Dive: Should there be a pope emeritus?
10-03-2022
Deep Dive: Should there be a pope emeritus?
When Benedict XVI resigned as pope, he broke with 600 years of tradition and reshaped the papacy—possibly forever. As people live longer, it is likely future popes will be more willing to follow Benedict XVI’s example instead of remaining and dying in office. But Benedict’s self-professed intention to be “hidden from the world” has hardly gone according to plan. A collection of controversies including Benedict’s 2019 letter attempting to explain the sexual abuse crisis in the church, the sudden removal of his name from a book that Cardinal Robert Sarah claimed to have co-written with him, and his recent, problematic contribution to church abuse investigators in Germany, have raised questions about future emeritus popes and who controls the messages issued in their names. Outside the Vatican, a small but vocal movement—including the former deputy prime minister of Italy, Matteo Salvini—continues to claim Benedict is still “my pope” and, in so doing, set him up, against his will, as a parallel authority to Pope Francis. It is likely Benedict resigned, in part, to avoid being subjected to the sort of manipulation and power-grabbing that Pope John Paul II faced in his final years as leader of the worldwide Catholic Church. But in the nine years since his resignation, Benedict’s legacy and the questions raised about his aptitude to govern are no less contested. On this deep dive episode of “Inside the Vatican,” host Colleen Dulle talks with Gerard O’Connell, America’s veteran Vatican correspondent; Christopher Lamb, author of “The Outsider: Pope Francis and the Battle to Reform the Church”; and Christopher Bellitto, a church historian at Kean University, in Union, N.J., to peel back the layers of papal politics, precedents and history. Together, they examine the title of pope emeritus—and what might need to change in the future to protect popes who retire from the opportunism and scandal we have witnessed in the nine years since the retirement of Benedict XVI. Links from the show: Austen Ivereigh: Pope Benedict’s letter on sex abuse is not an attack on Francis (or Vatican II) Editorial: Discerning when and how a pope emeritus should speak The Gloria Purvis Podcast: Do Pope Francis and Pope Benedict disagree about Vatican II and the traditional Latin Mass? David Gibson: Pope Benedict likely won’t be punished for his handling of sex abuse. But his record can point the way forward. More from our guests: The Election of Pope Francis: An Inside Account of the Conclave That Changed History by Gerard O’Connell The Outsider: Pope Francis and His Battle to Reform the Catholic Church by Christopher Lamb Website: Christopher M. Bellitto, Ph.D. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices