US History Repeated

Jimmy LaSalle & Jeananne Xenakis

History Repeated discusses important historical and political concepts that are essential to understanding and discussing U.S. history and politics. Topics and concepts that you should have learned in school, but weren’t interested at the time. History isn’t boring, but is often discussed with a political slant or bias. Our goal is to provide our listeners with the facts. Our podcasts avoid pushing a political agenda. We believe people are tired of being told what and how to think about a topic. Listen to the information provided, take your time to decide where you fall on the issue. Being informed is essential. read less
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Episodes

Japanese Incarceration Camps During World War Two Part 1
Mar 11 2024
Japanese Incarceration Camps During World War Two Part 1
After the attack on Pearl Harbor – political debate began about the need to protect the country against another attack from the Japanese, the fear of espionage, and racism all led to the eventual passage of a series of executive orders. Prior to the forced removal from the West Coast, assets were frozen, and the FBI led by J. Edgar Hoover had compiled a list of about 1500 people of Japanese ancestry that the FBI believed needed to be watched. These individuals were arrested the day after the attack. Many of them remained detained for the duration of the war. In addition, On January 14, 1942, FDR issued Executive Order 2537 which required non-U.S. citizens from World War II-enemy countries—Italy, Germany and Japan—to register with the United States Department of Justice. They were then issued a Certificate of Identification for Aliens of Enemy Nationality. Then came Executive Order 9066. This granted the secretary of war and his commanders the power “to prescribe military areas in such places and of such extent as he or the appropriate Military Commander may determine, from which any or all persons may be excluded.” There was no specific individuals or locations listed in the order. It was broad and left up to interpretation. It was quickly applied to just about the entire Japanese American population on the West Coast.  The War Relocation Board was created.    Listen to this podcast on how this went down and what exactly was involved. There is always more to learn, talk to y'all soon! Jimmy & Jean
The Golden Gate Bridge
Nov 20 2023
The Golden Gate Bridge
The Golden Gate Bridge is located in San Francisco and when it was finished in 1937, it was at one time the longest suspension bridge in the world. Today, it no longer holds that title – that belongs to a bridge in Turkey. We list all the record holding suspension bridges that are still in existance today. Jimmy and Jean have been on 7 of the 17! How many have you been on? The bridge was built by a team lead by Joseph B. Strauss, and would have to cover a mile of water. By the time the bridge was finished if you factor in the approaches to the bridge, it spans 1.7 miles. Not everyone supported the construction of the bridge. For one, it was going to be costly – 25 Million to be exact.  A Ferry company aptly named Golden Gate Ferries didn’t want the bridge to be built either. After all, how many people would need a ferry if there was a bridge they could cross instead? It took almost a decade to garner the support Strauss needed to build the bridge. Construction began on January 5, 1933. Built during the Great Depression, workers were paid $11 dollars a day. This was good pay for 1933 and the jobs were highly coveted. There had been calls for a long time to try to build a bridge to connect San Francisco to Marin County especially as the population grew. There were a number of challenges to building the bridge, learn all about the project of one of the United States' and the world's most iconic bridges in our podcast!   There is always more to learn!   -Jimmy and Jean