TILT Parenting: Raising Differently Wired Kids

Debbie Reber

TiLT Parenting, from parenting activist, speaker, and author Debbie Reber, features transformational interviews and conversations with authors, parenting experts, educators, and other parents aimed at inspiring, informing, and supporting parents raising differently-wired kids (giftedness, ADHD, austim, 2e, learning differences, sensory processing issues, anxiety, and more). TiLT aims to help parents feel empowered and in choice in how they parent, have more peace in their daily lives, and parent and advocate for their child from a place of confidence and awareness so that our children can thrive in every way. https:/tiltparenting.com read less
Kids & FamilyKids & Family

Episodes

TPP 372: Dr. Megan Anna Neff on Self-Care for Autistic People
Yesterday
TPP 372: Dr. Megan Anna Neff on Self-Care for Autistic People
I’ve done one episode just about self-care for this show — it’s a solocast from five years ago where I shared twelve strategies and ideas for creating a sustainable, doable self-care practice. I’ll have a link to that in the show notes page for this episode. Today’s episode is about self-care, too, but the focus is on self-care for autistic people, and joining me is return guest Dr. Megan Anna Neff of Neurodivergent Insights. Megan Anna has just published a brand new book called Self-Care for Autistic People: 100+ Ways to Recharge, De-Stress, and Unmask! which she wrote to help autistic people accept themselves, destigmatize autism, find community, and take care of physical and mental health. I really enjoyed going inside this book because, as we discuss, self-care is so much more than what it appears to be on the surface. Megan Anna considers self-care to be a collective effort that includes the well-being of the community, a framework that really resonated with me. So we talk about that, along with other ideas from Megan Anna’s book, including how internalized ableism can hinder self-care, considerations for navigating self-care for individuals with PDA, and insights into co-regulation, sensory considerations, and how advocacy and accommodations in the workplace can also be forms of self-care.   About Dr. Megan Anna Neff Dr. Megan Anna Neff (she/they) is a neurodivergent Clinical Psychologist and founder of Neurodivergent Insights where she creates education and wellness resources for neurodivergent adults. Additionally, she is co-host of the Divergent Conversations podcast. As a late-diagnosed AuDHDer (Autistic ADHD), Dr. Neff applies their lived experiences from a cross-neurotype marriage and parenting neurodivergent children to their professional focus. They are committed to broadening the mental health field's understanding of autism and ADHD beyond traditional stereotypes. This personal-professional blend enriches their work and advocacy within neurodiversity. Dr. Neff is the author of Self-Care for Autistic People and a forthcoming book on Autistic Burnout. Additionally, she has published in several peer-reviewed journals on topics ranging from neurodivergence, place attachment, relational psychoanalysis, social psychology, and integration of spirituality into psychotherapy. Passionate about distilling complex research into visually accessible formats, she translates research into visual pixels which you can find on her website, Instagram, and digital workbooks. Additionally, Dr. Neff is passionate about community building and creating digital communities by and for neurodivergent individuals.   Things you'll learn from this episode Why self-care should be approached with self-attunement and an understanding of one's own needs Why self-care is a collective effort that includes the well-being of the community How internalized ableism can hinder self-care and why it’s important to address it Ideas for navigating self-care for individuals with PDA regarding autonomy, co-regulation, and sensory considerations Ways to practice self-care in the workplace, including self-disclosure, documentation, and setting realistic expectations   Resources mentioned for Self-Care for Autistic People Dr. Megan Anna Neff’s website Self-Care For Autistic People by Dr. Megan Anna Neff * A special bonus offer for Tilt Parenting community * Divergent Conversations Podcast Neurodivergent Insights on Instagram Neurodivergent Insights on Facebook Dr. Megan Anna Neff on LinkedIn Dr. Megan Anna Neff’s Link in Bio Dr. Megan Anna Neff on Diagnoses and Misdiagnoses (Tilt Parenting Podcast) Sarah Wayland Is This Autism? A Guide for Clinicians and Everyone Else by Dr. Donna Henderson and Dr. Sarah Wayland Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
TPP 370: Dr. Eric Endlich on Gap Years Experiences for Neurodivergent Young Adults
Apr 9 2024
TPP 370: Dr. Eric Endlich on Gap Years Experiences for Neurodivergent Young Adults
As many listeners know, Asher is doing a gap year this year, having graduated from high school last summer. And so I’ve been pretty immersed in this topic, but I’ve been getting so many questions from families who want to know more about navigating gap year. And in fact, I’ve been hearing more and more about the benefits of gap years for ALL students, not only neurodivergent kids, especially since the pandemic. The questions I get the most are what exactly is a gap year? How is a parent to know if their child would benefit from taking a gap year? How should a student be spending their time between high school and college, if that is indeed the next step for them? And where should I start when it comes to finding and vetting the best programs and possibilities for a child taking this year between high school and what comes next? To explore this topic, I invited Dr. Eric Endlich, a clinical psychologist, founder of Top College Consultants, and expert who guides students with learning differences and mental health challenges through the college application process. I asked Eric how we can determine as parents whether our kid is ready or not for college, what types of gap year experiences for neurodivergent students exist, and how universities perceive a student taking a gap year when considering their application. We also talked about how to find the right program for your student and how to do some voting to make sure it’s the right fit. As you’ll hear from the episode, Eric has a wealth of knowledge about ways to navigate the sometimes lengthy and unique runway for neurodivergent students. I hope you enjoy this conversation! About Dr. Eric Endlich Eric Endlich, Ph.D., clinical psychologist and founder of Top College Consultants, guides students with learning differences and mental health challenges through the college application process. Dr. Endlich has served on the Learning Differences/Neurodiversity and DEI Committees of the Independent Educational Consultants Association (IECA), and was honored by IECA with a “Making a Difference” award for contributions such as a database of neurodiversity-friendly colleges. He co-teaches a course, Working with Students with Learning Differences, and co-manages a 16,000-member Facebook group for parents of college-bound neurodivergent students. A national presenter, researcher and professional writer, Dr.Endlich has been interviewed by various media including Forbes, Money magazine, College Confidential and U.S. News & World Report.   Things you'll learn The key components when considering a student’s college readiness, including academic capabilities and independence skills What types of gap year experiences are possible (from formal programs to DIY) How colleges perceive gap years, as well as whether to apply to universities before or during a gap year A look at the types of formal gap year programs specifically designed to support neurodivergent students Strategies and insights for researching and vetting gap year programs   Resources mentioned Top College Consultants Top College Consultants' Articles Neurodiversity in College (Top College Consultants' Resource) Top College Consultants on Facebook Young Scholars Academy The Dorm (therapeutic treatment center for young adults) Parents of College Bound Students with Learning Disabilities, ADHD and ASD (Facebook group) Dynamy Gap Year program Mansfield Hall (post-graduate program in Connecticut) Mitchell College Landmark College Summer Program Middlebridge School (post-graduate program in Rhode Island) SOAR Gap Year program Semester Off Program (Massachusetts) Franklin Academy (post-graduate program in Connecticut) Winston Transitions (non-residential post-graduate program in New York) CIP Transition Program at Berkeley (California)   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
TPP 368: Autum Romano on the Safe and Sound Protocol & Nervous System Regulation
Apr 2 2024
TPP 368: Autum Romano on the Safe and Sound Protocol & Nervous System Regulation
If I told you there was a passive intervention that could help your kiddo and your family increase the window of tolerance in the way the world is received, would you believe me? Well today, I’m sharing a conversation on exactly that — it’s called the Safe and Sound Protocol, and it’s essentially a therapeutic listening program designed to support emotional regulation and neuroception. I was first introduced to SSP by a therapist our family was working with and I wanted to know more about how it works, and how it can support kids who have what Dr. Mona Delahooke refers to as a less-sturdy nervous system platform. I reached out to educator, author, and bodyworker Autum Romano to join me for this conversation, as she is passionate about nervous system regulation as a foundation for transformative whole health. Autum, who is also neurodivergent and twice-exceptional, is known for her intuitive healing approach. She recently collaborated with Dr. Porges on a case study for his upcoming book on the benefits of the Safe and Sound Protocol, and last year published her own childrens’ book called Body Wisdom and the Polyvagal Theory, which introduces polyvagal theory in an easy-to-understand way. In this conversation, we talk about what neuroception is and why it’s critical to helping our kids develop a felt sense of safety, as well as what the Safe and Sound Protocol actually is. She explains how it essentially re-patterns the brain’s nervous system through listening, creates a safe space for brain and body integration, and leads to impactful, long-lasting results. This is a fascinating conversation about polyvagal, neuroception, and nervous system support that definitely left me wanting to know, and experience, more. I hope you get a lot out of it.   About Autum Romano Autum Romano is an educator, author, and bodyworker who’s passionate about nervous system regulation as a foundation for transformative whole health. Autum holds certifications as a Neuromuscular Therapist, Licensed Massage Therapist, Safe and Sound Protocol Provider, Craniosacral Therapist, Reiki Master, and Certified Trauma Informed Care Provider with over 27 years in the field and more than 25,000 massages given. Known for her intuitive healing approach, Autum is also neurodivergent and twice-exceptional. She recently collaborated with Dr. Porges on a case study for his upcoming book on the benefits of the Safe and Sound Protocol. In collaboration with her son, Autum has authored a children’s book titled Body Wisdom and the Polyvagal Theory. Crafted for pre-readers and individuals with dyslexia, their goal is to democratize the Polyvagal Theory, viewing it as a user manual for the body. They aim to make this valuable knowledge accessible to a diverse and inclusive audience.   Things you'll learn: How neuroception works to detect safety or threat without conscious awareness The ways in which body work can help individuals understand their neuroception What the Safe and Sound Protocol (SSP) is and how it stimulates the ventral branch of the vagus nerve through music The benefits of going through the SSP on our kids’ window of tolerance and nervous system How Autum’s book Body Wisdom and the Polyvagal Theory introduces polyvagal theory to kids of all ages   Resources mentioned: Autum Romano’s website Autum on Instagram Autum on Facebook Body Wisdom and the Polyvagal Theory by Autum Romano Dr. Stephen Porges and Polyvagal Theory Safe and Sound Protocol My Grandmother's Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies by Resmaa Menakem Deb Dana’s website, Rhythm of Regulation Anchored: How to Befriend Your Nervous System Using Polyvagal Theory by Deb Dana Deb Dana on Befriending Our Nervous System Using Polyvagal Theory (Tilt Parenting Podcast) To receive 10 percent of Autum’s Safe & Sound Protocol Home Program, use the code TILT Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
TPP 121a: A Conversation with Elisheva Schwartz of The Dyslexia Quest
Mar 29 2024
TPP 121a: A Conversation with Elisheva Schwartz of The Dyslexia Quest
In this week’s episode, I’m talking with Elisheva Schwartz, a dyslexia researcher, mother, wife, intelligence re-definer, and host of The Dyslexia Quest podcast. Elisheva is on a mission to empower the dyslexic community to fully understand both the strengths and the difficulties of the processing style. If you have a child with learning differences like dyslexia, this is a must-listen-to episode, as Elisheva gets personal and shares her story of her own childhood of struggling to reconcile her passion for learning with repeatedly being told she was learning disabled. Luckily for the rest of us, Elisheva has channeled the pain of her own childhood journey to helping families raising kids with learning differences help their kids feel empowered and confident about who they are, while also knowing how to advocate for them in school. I hope you enjoy our conversation.  About Elisheva: Elisheva Schwartz is a dyslexia researcher, mother, wife, intelligence re-definer, and podcast host. She’s on a mission to decode the dyslexic mind and empower the dyslexic community to fully understand both the strengths and the difficulties of the processing style. Both her academic background in Cognitive Science and Education, as well as her own personal experiences with dyslexia, allows Elisheva to draw on a unique blend of both the personal and scientific. Elisheva often writes about dyslexia, cognition, learning, creativity and intelligence, and maintains an occasional column at The Creativity Post. Additionally, Elisheva often speaks at universities and conferences, with some of her latest speaking engagement including The International Dyslexia Association (Panel) and University of Philadelphia.    THINGS YOU’LL LEARN FROM THIS EPISODE: Elisheva’s personal why for creating The Dyslexia Quest What the biggest roadblocks are for kids with learning differences like dyslexia in a traditional school setting What reframing dyslexia to view it through a strengths-based lens looks like How parents can help kids feel more positive about their learning differences How parents can work with schools to get them the support their child needs Elisheva’s advice on how parents can best approach their child’s learning differences and support their child What parents can expert in their journey of supporting their kids What the gifts of dyslexia are   RESOURCES MENTIONED: The Dyslexia Quest Podcast Elisheva on Instagram Elisheva on Facebook The Dyslexic Advantage: Unlocking the Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain by Brock L. Eide Dyslexic Advantage (website) Support the show Connect with Tilt Parenting Visit Tilt Parenting Take the free 7-Day Challenge Read a chapter of Differently Wired Follow Tilt on Twitter & Instagram Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
TPP 367: Dr. Aliza Pressman on the 5 Principles of Parenting
Mar 26 2024
TPP 367: Dr. Aliza Pressman on the 5 Principles of Parenting
I can’t tell you how many parenting books I’ve read, but I can tell you that sometimes when I finish reading a parenting book, I feel a sense of loss or stress or as if I'm somehow behind and need to backtrack to get things going in the right direction. So when I come across a book that feels supportive and accessible, I’m always happy to share it with you. And that is definitely the case with The 5 Principles of Parenting: Your Essential Guide to Raising Good Humans, the new book by friend of the pod Dr. Aliza Pressman. I think what I love so much about Aliza’s work is that she compassionately reminds us that there’s no one “right” way to raise good humans. Instead, in her book she helps parents charge a manageable course for raising good humans that’s in alignment with our own values and our children’s unique temperaments. The five principles outlined in her book that she walks through with us in this conversation – Relationship, Reflection, Regulation, Rules, and Repair – can be used to get things right often enough, because there’s not getting a perfect score in parenting. Lots of great reminders in this conversation, and the one I appreciated the most is that even though what it takes to raise good humans may sound simple, that doesn't mean that it’s easy, or that it’s not going to feel messy. In fact, it’s most definitely going to feel messy, and that’s okay!   About Dr. Aliza Pressman Dr. Aliza Pressman is a developmental psychologist with nearly two decades of experience working with families and the health care providers who care for them. Aliza is an assistant clinical professor in the Department of Pediatrics in the Division of Behavioral and Developmental Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital where she is cofounding director of The Mount Sinai Parenting Center. Aliza is also the host of the award-winning podcast, Raising Good Humans. She holds a BA from Dartmouth College, an MA in Risk, Resilience, and Prevention from the Department of Human Development at Teacher’s College and her PhD in developmental psychology from Columbia University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Aliza also holds a teaching certificate in mindfulness and meditation from The Greater Good Science Center at the University of California at Berkeley. Aliza is the mother of two teenagers.   Things you'll learn from this episode The definition of a 'good human' is subjective and varies from family to family The five principles of parenting are relationship, reflection, regulation, rules, and repair Resilience is an important aspect of parenting, especially for neurodivergent children The principles can be applied to various parenting situations, including sibling conflicts Parenting is supposed to be messy — there is no one-size-fits-all approach   Resources mentioned for the 5 Principles of Parenting Aliza Pressman’s website The 5 Principles of Parenting: Your Essential Guide to Raising Good Humans by Dr. Aliza Pressman Aliza’s Raising Good Humans Podcast Aliza on Instagram Mount Sinai Parenting Center SeedingsGroup W. Thomas Boyce (Orchid Children)   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
TPP 366: Natasha Daniels on Helping Kids Crush OCD
Mar 19 2024
TPP 366: Natasha Daniels on Helping Kids Crush OCD
It’s been a while since we’ve talked about OCD on the show, so when anxiety and OCD expert Natasha Daniels reached out about her new book, Crushing OCD Workbook for Kids, I was excited to get into it all and pulled together a lot of questions ready to make this conversation as helpful as possible for our community. You may know Natasha from her popular AT Survival Parenting podcast, or some of her other books like Anxiety Sucks: A Teen Survival Guide, How to Parent Your Anxious Toddler, Social Skills Activities for Kids, andIt’s Brave to Be Kind, or from her past visit to this show. She has more than two decades of experience as a child therapist, and combines her clinical expertise with her lived experience in her work, as she’s raising her three kids with anxiety and OCD. You also may have seen her work featured in places like Huffington Post, Scary Mommy, PsychCentral, The Child Mind Institute and The Mighty. So for today’s conversation, I wanted to do a deep dive into OCD and learn more about what it is, how it manifests, signs of OCD that might be missed by parents, how to tease out when something is OCD versus anxiety or ADHD or other types of neurodivergence, and lastly, how parents can support their children if they have OCD. And of course, Natasha shared some insights and tools from her new Crushing OCD Workbook for Kids, which is truly a powerful, and easy-to-use resource for any child navigating OCD and the challenges that come along with it.   About Natasha Daniels Natasha Daniels is an anxiety and OCD child therapist with over two decades of experience. She combines both her clinical expertise with her lived experience, raising her own three kids with anxiety and OCD. She is the author of several books including Anxiety Sucks: A Teen Survival Guide, How to Parent Your Anxious Toddler, Social Skills Activities for Kids, It’s Brave to Be Kind, The Grief Rock, and Crushing OCD Workbook for Kids. She is the creator of the website AT Parenting Survival, As well as the host of the show AT Parenting Survival Podcast and the Youtube channel, Ask the Child Therapist. Her work has been featured in various places including Huffington Post, Scary Mommy, PsychCentral, The Child Mind Institute and The Mighty.   Things you'll learn from this episode How OCD begins and manifests in children What intrusive thoughts or feelings are and how they can lead to compulsions Why OCD is often misdiagnosed as ADHD, anxiety, or self-harm and why it’s important to receive an accurate diagnosis What exposure response prevention (ERP) therapy is and how it supports individuals with OCD What OCD with support looks like over time with helpful treatment and the development of coping skills The importance of early intervention in supporting children with OCD How Natasha’s book Crushing OCD Workbook for Kids provides evidence-based tools and strategies to help children understand and manage their OCD   Resources mentioned for Unmasking Autism Natasha Daniels’ website Crushing OCD Workbook for Kids: 50 Fun Activities to Overcome OCD With CBT and Exposures by Natasha Daniels Natasha Daniels Talks about Anxiety and OCD in Kids (Tilt Parenting Podcast) AT Parenting Podcast AT Parenting Survival Online Courses AT Parenting survival on Instagram AT Parenting survival on Youtube Filmmaker Chris Baier Helps Families Get Unstuck from OCD (Tilt Parenting Podcast) UNSTUCK: An OCD Kids Movie (Available with Spanish, French, Russian, Greek, Portuguese subtitles and an audio description) Help for Childhood Anxiety and OCD with Dr. Eli Leibowitz (Tilt Parenting Podcast) Space Treatment website   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
TPP 365: Dr. Alok Kanojia Explains How to Raise Healthy Gamers
Mar 12 2024
TPP 365: Dr. Alok Kanojia Explains How to Raise Healthy Gamers
I married a gamer and my 19-year-old is also a gamer, so I’m no stranger to the reality of video games being a significant part of daily life. But where’s the line between healthy gaming and unhealthy gaming? How much gaming is too much? And when does a gaming habit evolve into gaming addiction? These are some of the questions regarding screen time that I hear from many parents, and they highlight some of the ongoing challenges families face in raising children who can be responsible tech users and whose screen use and gaming doesn’t interfere with their lives in a way that can be harmful or keep them stuck. So when I learned of the new book How to Raise a Healthy Gamer: End Power Struggles, Break Bad Screen Habits, and Transform Your Relationship with Your Kids by Dr. Alok Kanojia, I knew I wanted to invite him onto the show to talk about all things gaming with us. In this conversation, we talked about how we as parents can know whether our child is addicted to video games or not, why screen time limits and restricting gaming time are at odds with the goal of raising a healthy gamer, and how to shift to a holistic approach that considers overall well-being and goal-setting. We also talked about why children with ADHD are more susceptible to addictive behaviors surrounding gaming and how to raise healthy gamers from a young age. A packed episode that is a must-listen for any parenting whose child interacts with online or video games. Good, good stuff.   About Dr. Alok Kanojia Dr. Alok Kanojia is a Harvard-trained psychiatrist specializing in the intersection of technology x mental health. Also known as ”Dr. K” to millions of people on the internet, Dr.Kanojia is the cofounder of Healthy Gamer, a mental health platform that serves the digital generation. He has inspired millions of people with online content while overseeing the mental health coaching of thousands of young people. He is widely regarded as the foremost expert on video game addiction and most prominent mental health authority for young people. When he’s offline, he’s usually traveling, gardening, or grilling with his family.   Things you'll learn: How to determine if your child has a gaming addiction, and why it's important to trust your instincts Why screen time limits and carrot and stick approaches surrounding a child’s gaming is at odds with the goal of raising a healthy gamer Why children with ADHD are more susceptible to addictive behaviors surrounding gaming The importance of engaging in open and non-judgmental communication with your child about their gaming habits and the impact it has on their life How to shift to a holistic approach that considers overall well-being and goal-setting Ideas for proactively creating healthy gaming habits with younger children   Resources mentioned: Healthy Gamer website How to Raise a Healthy Gamer: End Power Struggles, Break Bad Screen Habits, and Transform Your Relationship with Your Kids by Dr. Alok Kanojia Growing Up in Public: Coming of Age in a Digital World by Dr. Devorah Heitner Dr. Devorah Heitner on Parenting Kids Growing Up in Public (Tilt Parenting Podcast) Screenwise: Helping Kids Thrive (and Survive) in Their Digital World by Dr. Devorah Heitner   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
TPP 364: A Montessori Approach to Raising Neurodivergent Children, with Simone Davies & Junnifa Uzodike
Mar 5 2024
TPP 364: A Montessori Approach to Raising Neurodivergent Children, with Simone Davies & Junnifa Uzodike
Montessori is often thought of as an educational philosophy, but my guests for today’s episode, Simone Davies and Junnifa Uzodike, are committed to bringing Montessori into the home and guiding parents through the principles of Montessori to enhance their children's development and foster respectful relationships with their families and the world. Over the years, I’ve learned how much alignment there is in the strength-based parenting approach we subscribe to in our community, where we see and respect our children as the unique humans they are, with the core principles of Montessori, which prioritizes meeting our children where they are and being a guide for them as they navigate their childhood. So I invited Simone and Junnifa to come on the show to talk about how we can apply these Montessori principles to parenting our neurodivergent kids and some of the other concepts they write about in their lovely new book, The Montessori Child: A Parent's Guide to Raising Capable Children with Creative Minds and Compassionate Hearts.   About Simone Davies Simone Davies is the author of The Montessori Toddler and co-author of The Montessori Baby and The Montessori Child books, comprehensive guides to raising children in a Montessori way.Simone is an AMI Montessori educator based in Amsterdam. She also has a popular blog, instagram and podcast “The Montessori Notebook” and is mother to two young adults. Simone currently runs parent-child Montessori classes in Amsterdam at her school Jacaranda Tree Montessori. About Junnifa Uzodike Junnifa Uzodike is an AMI trained Montessori guide for the 0-3, 3-6 and 6-12 levels. She is the co-author of The Montessori Baby and The Montessori Child book with Simone Davies. She is also the founder and head of school at Fruitful Orchard Montessori in Abuja, Nigeria. Since discovering Montessori in 2011, Junnifa has continued to build her knowledge and experience in child development using Montessori principles. She has three children whom she has raised using Montessori principles from birth. Junnifa’s Montessori work includes guiding children at Fruitful Orchard, mentoring teachers and closest to her heart is supporting parents in implementing Montessori from birth. She inspires parents around the world to bring Montessori into their lives by sharing her Montessori journey and offering courses and other resources via her blog.   Things you'll learn: What the philosophy of Montessori is and the planes of development Why the Montessori approach to parenting can be a good fit for neurodivergent children How to raise children who have a strong moral compass The role of family agreements to reduce conflict and support healthy family dynamics What scaffolding looks like in Montessori when helping children expand their sense of capability and responsibility   Resources mentioned: Simone Davies’ website, The Montessori Notebook Junnifa Uzodike’s website, Nduoma Montessori The Montessori Child: A Parent's Guide to Raising Capable Children with Creative Minds and Compassionate Hearts by Simone Davies and Junnifa Uzodike The Montessori Toddler: A Parent's Guide to Raising a Curious and Responsible Human Being by Simone Davies The Montessori Baby: A Parent's Guide to Nurturing Your Baby with Love, Respect, and Understanding by Simone Davies and Junnifa Uzodike The Montessori Notebook on Instagram Nduoma Montessori on Instagram Simone Davis on Montessori and Differently Wired Children (Tilt Parenting Podcast) The Power of Empathy and Staying Calm in Difficult Situations (podcast episode with Simone Davies) Setting Up Your Home to Support Your Child’s Growth (podcast episode with Simone Davies) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
TPP 363: Emily Ladau on Demystifying Disability: What to Know, What to Say, and How to be an Ally
Feb 27 2024
TPP 363: Emily Ladau on Demystifying Disability: What to Know, What to Say, and How to be an Ally
A theme we often touch upon on this show is how the discourse surrounding neurodivergence and the language used when referring to neurodivergence is ever-evolving. I’ve observed on social media and in other spaces how conversations about terminology can be confusing, divisive, alienating, and complicated to navigate. Disability is one of those terms that can be uncomfortable for some people, including parents of neurodivergent kids, to embrace, but my hope is that this conversation will help you have a deeper understanding of what it means to be disabled, how ableism shows up and hurts all members of the disability community, including our kids, and how we can be better allies in the disability To talk about this, I invited disability rights activist and writer Emily Ladau onto the show. Emily wrote a wonderful book called Demystifying Disability: What to Know, What to Say, and How to be an Ally, and in today’s conversation, we explore some of the core ideas in her book. As always, we covered a lot of ground in this episode, including what it actually means to be disabled, why the euphemism “special needs” is problematic for many people, how ableism is normalized in our society, disability etiquette do’s and dont’s to keep in mind for future interactions, and so much more.   About Emily Ladau Emily Ladau is a passionate disability rights activist, writer, storyteller, and digital communications consultant whose career began at the age of 10, when she appeared on several episodes of Sesame Street to educate children about her life with a physical disability. Her writing has been published in outlets including The New York Times, CNN, Vice, and HuffPost and her first book, Demystifying Disability: What to Know, What to Say, and How to be an Ally, was published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House, in September 2021. Emily has spoken before numerous audiences, from the U.S. Department of Education to the United Nations. Central to all of Emily’s work is harnessing the power of storytelling to engage people in learning about disability.   Things you'll learn from this episode The difference between models of disability, including the medical, social, and charity model Why it’s critical that we recognize and address internalized ableism in order to promote inclusivity What intersectionality is and ways disability intersects with other marginalized identities What should be considered when looking at accommodations and accessibility when meeting the diverse needs of individuals Do’s, don’t’s and best practices when it comes to disability etiquette   Resources mentioned for Demystifying Disability: What to Know, What to Say, and How to be an Ally Emily Ladau’s website Demystifying Disability: What to Know, What to Say, and How to be an Ally by Emily Ladau The Accessible Stall (Emily’s podcast) Words I Wheel By (Emily’s Facebook page) Emily on Instagram Emily on LinkedIn Tyler Fedder (Illustrator) D’Arcee Neal The Platinum Rule   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
TPP 362: Dr. Chris Wells Explains the Theory of Positive Disintegration
Feb 20 2024
TPP 362: Dr. Chris Wells Explains the Theory of Positive Disintegration
I have such a fascinating conversation for you today. A few months ago, I heard about something called the Theory of Positive Disintegration — a theory created by K. Dabrowski, whose name I was familiar with because of his bringing attention to the idea that gifted children have inborn traits known as overexcitabilities – and I was instantly curious. Positive Disintegration – what does that mean exactly? It sounded complicated, and good, but also messy. So I wanted to know more. That’s when I learned of the work of Dr. Chris Wells, who is the founding president of the Dąbrowski Center and who is dedicated to sharing knowledge and resources about this profound theory and the psychology of giftedness. I invited Chris on the show to explore the Theory of Positive Disintegration with us, and fortunately for all of us, they said yes. And I will just say upfront — there is a lot that goes into understanding this theory and the implications it has for our differently wired children. So in today’s episode, we are only scratching the surface of this theory. But I am so excited for the opportunity to share this conversation because I believe this fascinating framework has the potential to offer a new perspective on neurodivergence and mental health that is important for families in our community to explore. One last thing, this episode includes mention of suicidality and suicide attempts, so if those are trigger topics for you, please take care of yourself while listening.   About Chris Wells Chris Wells, PhD, LSW, is a neurodivergent writer, social worker, and Dąbrowski scholar with a passion for studying and applying the theory of positive disintegration. As the founding president of the Dąbrowski Center and co-host of the Positive Disintegration Podcast, Chris is dedicated to sharing knowledge and resources about this profound theory and the psychology of giftedness.Chris provides specialized consulting services to clinicians and educators internationally, delivering deep insights into positive disintegration and its practical applications. They also offer their unique blend of lived experience and professional expertise as an advocate and speaker for mental health awareness and suicide prevention. Chris lives with their partner and teenage son in Highlands Ranch, Colorado.   Things you'll learn: What the Theory of Positive Disintegration is and how it offers an alternative perspective on mental health struggles What the five domains of Dabrowski’s Overexcitabilities How the connection between overexcitabilities and the autonomic nervous system can provide insights into nervous system regulation How the Theory of Positive Disintegration fits in with traditional therapeutic modalities How anxiety and depression might be signs of growth and development   Resources mentioned: Chris Well’s substack Positive Integration The Dabrowski Center The Positive Disintegration Podcast Dabrowski’s Overexcitabilities “Mellow Out,” They Say. If I Only Could: Intensities and Sensitivities of the Young and Bright by Michael Piechowski Michael Piechowski Adults with Overexciteabilities Facebook Group Living With Intensity: Understanding the Sensitivity, Excitability, and the Emotional Development of Gifted Children, Adolescents, and Adults edited by Dr. Susan Daniels and Dr. Michael Piechowski Welcome to Positive Disintegration (Positive Disintegration Podcast) Depression and Anxiety in Development (Positive Disintegration Podcast) Positive Disintegration in Children and Adolescents (Positive Disintegration Podcast) Disintegration and Neurodivergence (Positive Disintegration Podcast) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices