Admissions Straight Talk

Linda Abraham

Advice on applying to business, grad, law, and medical school. read less

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MD/PA/NP/DO/DDS/MPH: What Do They Require?
3d ago
MD/PA/NP/DO/DDS/MPH: What Do They Require?
Discover the differences between and how to get accepted to common healthcare admissions tracks [Show Summary] Accepted consultant Dr. Valerie Wherley has an impressive and extensive background in pre-health, having advised thousands of students to acceptance at their dream schools and programs. In this highly informative podcast interview, she distinguishes the differences between common healthcare admissions tracks and shares how to craft a compelling application for each one. Interview with Dr. Valerie Wherley, Accepted admissions consultant and former post-bac program director & pre-health advisor [Show Notes] Welcome to the 499th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for tuning in. We have lots of resources, articles, guides, and podcast episodes that can help you get accepted to the graduate healthcare programs of your choice. Go to accepted.com/healthcare to explore the library of free resources there. Today is all about healthcare, and our guest is Dr. Valerie Wherley, an Accepted consultant. Dr. Wherley earned her BS and MS at the University of Maine in Kinesiology and her Ph.D. in Higher Education/Higher Education Administration from the University of Connecticut. Over the last 20 years, she has served as the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs and Career Development at William Beaumont School of Medicine, Director of the Pre-Health Post-bac Certification program at Sacred Heart University, and the Director of Pre-health Advisement Sacred Heart University. In those roles, and before joining Accepted earlier this year, she advised thousands of students in the following pre-health tracks: pre-med, pre-PA, pre-vet, pre-dental, pre-pharmacy, pre-PT, pre-OT, pre-accelerated nursing, and pre-optometry as well as applicants to master's programs in Exercise Science, Biomedical Sciences, Occupational Therapy, Speech-Language Pathology, Athletic Training, Public Health, and Applied Nutrition.  Let's tap into that amazingly broad and notable experience. What should all applicants in healthcare fields have if they want to apply successfully? What are the common requirements? [2:27] Great question. As you said, I have worked with a variety of pre-health fields during the time I worked at Sacred Heart and at the Beaumont School of Medicine. The commonality that students need to have in their academics is a demonstration of mastery of those prerequisite courses. They need a very strong academic transcript and whatever those prerequisite courses are for their intended path. Typically, that's the sciences. A lot of those pre-health tracks have common courses such as biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, and anatomy, with some nuances depending on the track. There's just no way around saying you have to demonstrate competency and mastery of those foundational concepts on your academic transcript. You have to be strong there. From an experience perspective, my suggestion is to demonstrate that you have exposure to your intended career path. Exposure comes from observing, shadowing, and interviewing the people who are doing the work you want to be doing in the future. It's not enough if you have a family member who has said to you, "You'll make a great dentist one day," that's lovely. However, you have to have been in the trenches seeing the work and still know that it is your calling. You can demonstrate that in your personal statement and in your interview when you are applying to graduate school. shadowing enough? [4:31] Shadowing is the first place to start. When I worked with undergraduate students, I always said shadowing is step one to really see if this is the place where you want to be. Shadowing is a great place to understand what you do and what you don't like. I would have pre-PT students, for example, who would shadow a physical therapist for a few weeks and walk away from that experience and say,
MD/PA/NP/DO/DDS/MPH: What Do They Require?
3d ago
MD/PA/NP/DO/DDS/MPH: What Do They Require?
Discover the differences between and how to get accepted to common healthcare admissions tracks [Show Summary] Accepted consultant Dr. Valerie Wherley has an impressive and extensive background in pre-health, having advised thousands of students to acceptance at their dream schools and programs. In this highly informative podcast interview, she distinguishes the differences between common healthcare admissions tracks and shares how to craft a compelling application for each one. Interview with Dr. Valerie Wherley, Accepted admissions consultant and former post-bac program director & pre-health advisor [Show Notes] Welcome to the 499th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for tuning in. We have lots of resources, articles, guides, and podcast episodes that can help you get accepted to the graduate healthcare programs of your choice. Go to accepted.com/healthcare to explore the library of free resources there. Today is all about healthcare, and our guest is Dr. Valerie Wherley, an Accepted consultant. Dr. Wherley earned her BS and MS at the University of Maine in Kinesiology and her Ph.D. in Higher Education/Higher Education Administration from the University of Connecticut. Over the last 20 years, she has served as the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs and Career Development at William Beaumont School of Medicine, Director of the Pre-Health Post-bac Certification program at Sacred Heart University, and the Director of Pre-health Advisement Sacred Heart University. In those roles, and before joining Accepted earlier this year, she advised thousands of students in the following pre-health tracks: pre-med, pre-PA, pre-vet, pre-dental, pre-pharmacy, pre-PT, pre-OT, pre-accelerated nursing, and pre-optometry as well as applicants to master's programs in Exercise Science, Biomedical Sciences, Occupational Therapy, Speech-Language Pathology, Athletic Training, Public Health, and Applied Nutrition.  Let's tap into that amazingly broad and notable experience. What should all applicants in healthcare fields have if they want to apply successfully? What are the common requirements? [2:27] Great question. As you said, I have worked with a variety of pre-health fields during the time I worked at Sacred Heart and at the Beaumont School of Medicine. The commonality that students need to have in their academics is a demonstration of mastery of those prerequisite courses. They need a very strong academic transcript and whatever those prerequisite courses are for their intended path. Typically, that's the sciences. A lot of those pre-health tracks have common courses such as biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, and anatomy, with some nuances depending on the track. There's just no way around saying you have to demonstrate competency and mastery of those foundational concepts on your academic transcript. You have to be strong there. From an experience perspective, my suggestion is to demonstrate that you have exposure to your intended career path. Exposure comes from observing, shadowing, and interviewing the people who are doing the work you want to be doing in the future. It's not enough if you have a family member who has said to you, "You'll make a great dentist one day," that's lovely. However, you have to have been in the trenches seeing the work and still know that it is your calling. You can demonstrate that in your personal statement and in your interview when you are applying to graduate school. shadowing enough? [4:31] Shadowing is the first place to start. When I worked with undergraduate students, I always said shadowing is step one to really see if this is the place where you want to be. Shadowing is a great place to understand what you do and what you don't like. I would have pre-PT students, for example, who would shadow a physical therapist for a few weeks and walk away from that experience and say,
How to Get Accepted to MIT Sloan MBA
29-11-2022
How to Get Accepted to MIT Sloan MBA
Discover all you need to know about MIT Sloan's MBA program [Show Summary] MIT Sloan is one of the magic M7 MBA programs, and its Assistant Dean, Dawna Levenson, shares everything applicants aiming for acceptance should know.  Interview with Dawna Levenson, Assistant Dean at MIT Sloan School of Management [Show Notes] Welcome to the 498th episode of Admissions Straight Talk, Accepted's podcast. Thanks for tuning in. Are you ready to apply to your dream MBA programs? Are you competitive at your target schools? Accepted's MBA admissions quiz can give you a quick reality check. Just go to accepted.com/mbaquiz, complete the quiz, and you'll not only get an assessment, but also tips on how to improve your qualifications. Plus, it's all free.  It gives me great pleasure to have back on Admissions Straight Talk, Dawna Levenson, Assistant Dean at MIT Sloan School of Management. Dawna earned her bachelor's and master's in Management Science at MIT Sloan, became a partner at Accenture, and then returned to MIT Sloan in 2007 as Associate Director of Academic Programs. She moved into Admissions in 2012 and became Director of Admissions in 2013 and Assistant Dean in 2018.  Can you give us an overview of the MIT Sloan Full-Time MBA program for those listeners who aren't that familiar with it? [2:07] Absolutely. I think I would begin with class size. Our two-year MBA has a class size of roughly 410. You may have some friends who just graduated in the past year or so, and their class size was slightly bigger. That’s a result of the pandemic when there was a fair amount of uncertainty, and we actually grew the class size in 2020. However, it was never intended for that to be permanent, and so we have slowly worked our way back down. Fundamentally, the class that just matriculated, and moving forward, will be approximately 410.  We have a one-semester core and then three semesters to really shape the curriculum as you see fit based on your interests. As much as you as a student have flexibility in terms of your classes and shaping that, our faculty have a lot of flexibility, too, in terms of how they teach. Your classes will be a combination of traditional lectures and problem sets, as well as a lot of project-based classes. We have a subset of these project-based classes that are called our Action Learning labs, where you are either on a particular subject matter or focused on a certain geography and working as part of a team to solve a real problem for a real company and make recommendations to them at the end of the project. hbspt.cta.load(58291, '9bb31be0-3cf6-45f0-be3d-3791cc1bd9bd', {}); Are you seeing any trends in terms of hiring? Where do MIT Sloan MBA grads get jobs? [3:42] We just recently published our 2022-2023 employment report, so these numbers are right off of that. For students who graduated in 2022 seeking employment, 31.2% of them went into consulting, 22.6% went into finance, and 22.6% went into technology. An additional 6.8% went into pharma, healthcare, and biotech. It’s a good spread. What's a little misleading is some may have gone into consulting, but they’re focused on the tech industry. So, keep that in mind. Can you explain the optional core electives? [5:02] Our two-year MBA students spend their first semester taking core classes. You’re actually part of a cohort of somewhere between 65 and 70 students who you're taking all of your classes with. You're also assigned to be part of a core team of six or seven people where you're actually doing all of your work together. In addition to your core set of classes, you also have the option to take one additional elective. You can choose from marketing, finance, strategy, or operations for that additional elective. What are the core requirements? [5:48] They include microeconomics, DMD, which is data models and decisions, accounting, and communications.  What are the tracks and certificates that MIT Sloan offers?
Encore: An Interview With the Temple Katz School of Medicine Admissions Dean
22-11-2022
Encore: An Interview With the Temple Katz School of Medicine Admissions Dean
Welcome to the 497th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for joining me. It’s Thanksgiving week! I want to take this opportunity to thank you again for joining me. Because of the holiday I decided to air one of the most popular shows of 2022: An Interview With the Temple Katz School of Medicine Admissions Dean I chose this interview with Dr. Jacob Ufberg not only because of its popularity, but because Dean Ufberg gave wonderful insight into Temple Katz’ medical school, its integrated approach to teaching medicine and its tight ties to the community that it serves. If you haven’t tuned in for this interview, please do so. And if you listened already, it might be worth a second listen.Also a quick announcement. If you have parents who are curious about the medical school application process or maybe a little anxious about it. Tell them about the Parents of Preprofessional Applicant Facebook group. They can join at you like this episode and want to test out whether you are competitive at your target medical schools, take the free Medical School Admissions Quiz at accepted.com/medquiz. It’s a brief assessment that will give you valuable information into your competitiveness as well as suggestions for improving your qualifications and competitiveness. Take it today at accepted.com/medquiz. Thanks as always for listening to Admissions Straight Talk. Wishing you a wonderful Thanksgiving! I’ll talk to you again next week! In the meantime, here is An Interview with the Temple Katz School of Medicine Admissions Dean. For the complete show notes, check out the original blog post. Related links: Temple University – Lewis Katz School of MedicineMed School Essentials Video CourseTemple Katz Secondary Essay TipsAccepted’s Medical School Admissions Consulting Related shows: NYMC: How to Get InDeep Dive into Penn Perelman School of Medicine: An Interview with Dr. Neha Vapiwala, Dean for AdmissionsTulane School of Medicine: How to Get InAll You Want to Know About Georgetown Medical School’s AdmissionsTemple University’s Postbac Programs: A Plethora of Possibilities4 Steps for Showing Fit in Your Application hbspt.cta.load(58291, '6f21f36c-c988-4e9c-b947-0b9d4af1557f', {"region":"na1"});
How to Get Accepted to UNC Kenan-Flagler Full-Time MBA Program
15-11-2022
How to Get Accepted to UNC Kenan-Flagler Full-Time MBA Program
Discover all you need to know about UNC Kenan-Flagler's MBA program [Show Summary] UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School is a leading MBA program located in North Carolina, an emerging business hotspot. Danielle Richie, UNC’s MBA Admissions Director, describes the qualities that make up the dynamic student body and shares her tips on how to get in. Interview with Danielle Richie, Dir. of Full-Time MBA Admissions and Student Recruitment at UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School [Show Notes] Welcome to the 496th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for joining me. Before we get to our wonderful guest, you're invited to take the free six-question quiz at accepted.com/mapmba to see how prepared you are to actually apply. You'll also gain access to relevant other resources, both free and paid, that can help you develop an application strategy for acceptance.  It gives me great pleasure to have for the first time on Admissions Straight Talk Danielle Richie, Director of Full-Time MBA Admissions and Student Recruitment at UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School. Danielle earned her Bachelor's in Public Relations at Oswego and her Master's in Communications at Syracuse University. She has worked in higher ed admissions and administration at Utica College, Syracuse University, Bentley University, and of course, UNC Kenan-Flagler, where she moved to in 2018 as Senior Associate Director for MBA Admissions and Recruiting. In November 2021, almost exactly a year ago, she became Director of Full-Time MBA Admissions and Recruiting.  Can you give an overview of UNC Kenan-Flagler's full-time MBA program, focusing on its more distinctive elements? [2:27] UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School is located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. We are a two-year MBA program at 62 credits. There are 15 core classes where candidates get the breadth of business. We have 12 concentrations that students can select from to gain more in-depth knowledge. These vary from business analytics to consulting, marketing, healthcare, real estate, and so on and so forth. You really get to create your own journey, if you will, with an MBA from Kenan-Flagler. We are STEM-designated, and it does not matter which concentration you pursue. You actually don't even have to, and about 20% of our students will just do a general MBA and they'll pick and choose from over 125 different electives to make up their program. We do require an internship between year one and year two. A lot of our students will do a "traditional internship" where they will apply and go on to work six to eight weeks in the summer with a company. What's new at Kenan-Flagler? [3:41] There are a lot of exciting things going on at Kenan-Flagler. We had our groundbreaking ceremony in September for a new building that will open up in 2024. We're very excited about that. We're not looking to expand the MBA program, but the building that we're in currently was opened in 1997. We do want to grow our undergrad business program by doubling it, so we are building that facility. Jamie Dimon from JP Morgan Chase came and was one of our guest speakers.  We also just launched our Charlotte MBA Executive Program, located in Charlotte, North Carolina. It's about two hours from Chapel Hill and is an executive format that working professionals can use to earn their MBA. That’s in-person and is targeted to applicants from North Carolina as well as South Carolina because Charlotte is close to the South Carolina border. As Charlotte continues to grow, especially in the financial space, we saw that it was a great opportunity to offer the Charlotte MBA, as well as some executive development opportunities off campus. Can you highlight the modular system? [5:31] We call them mods and prospective students always ask, "What's a mod?" A mod is essentially seven to eight weeks of classes that you take. You're in Mod 1 when you start class. By October break, you'll be taking your final exams,
Stride Funding: Where Your Education is an Investment and not a Debt
08-11-2022
Stride Funding: Where Your Education is an Investment and not a Debt
Find out how you can benefit from Stride Funding [Show Summary] Tess Michaels shares what’s new at Stride Funding, the innovative educational financing company she founded, and reflects on the impact that her Harvard Business School MBA has had on her impressive success today. Interview with Tess Michaels, Founder and CEO of Stride Funding [Show Notes] Welcome to the 495th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for tuning in. I don't usually plug Accepted services on this podcast, but Accepted is having a fantastic special, the last one of 2022, and I would be remiss if I didn't share this news with Admissions Straight Talk's listeners. You can save up to $1,000 on Accepted services between now and November 14th. You premeds looking to next year, now is your opportunity to lock in a package at this very special rate AND start your application early. For those of you with December and January deadlines interested in a few hours of invaluable editing and advising, you too can save. Go to accepted.com, choose the type of service that's best for you, and use coupon code SAVENOW. This special ends November 14th.  I'd like to welcome back to Admissions Straight Talk Tess Michaels, Founder and CEO of Stride Funding. Tess graduated from Penn with a Bachelor's in Applied Science and another Bachelor's from the Wharton School in Global Impact Investing and Operations Management. While at Penn, she founded SOCEANA, a platform to democratize giving and promote corporate volunteerism, which was acquired in 2018. After graduating and being accepted to Harvard's 2+2 program, she worked at Goldman Sachs as an analyst for two years, and then at Vista Equity Partners as a private equity associate. As soon as she arrived at Harvard Business School, she founded Stride Funding, which we're going to learn a lot more about in today’s show.  Can you give us an overview of Stride Funding's approach to student financing and how it differs from traditional student loans? [2:20] Absolutely. As you mentioned, I was actually inspired by my own experience as a student when founding Stride. I was part of the 2+2 program at Harvard. I knew I was going to pursue my MBA, and candidly went through the back and forth of the question, “Is it worth it to go back to school?” That sticker price is just so hefty, and I realized a lot of my peers were in the same boat. I was even asking everyone, "If you could solve one thing, what would it be?" and everyone kept saying, "I want to go back to school, but the costs are prohibitive and I have no guarantee around the outcomes."  I became really fascinated with two concepts. One, how do we actually structure products to align incentives and naturally tie into the outcomes that students receive? And secondly, how do we increase access? I found it so backward that despite going to a great school and great program, almost every lender asks for students to have co-signers. In fact, 92% of private loans require a co-signer which really just means being backed up by a wealthy parent or family member who has a clean credit score and can guarantee your loan. To me, that felt like such a backward system because the whole point of going to school is to do better than your family and to create future potential in your growth. I'm happy to walk through the ways that we've addressed this with Stride's products, but that was really where we started. you describe Stride Funding's three products? [4:08] We have three products on the market and are continuing to grow our product set. They range on the spectrum of product differentiation and then differentiation on access. Each of our products is non-co-signer based. Anytime you come to Stride, you know that you are going to be evaluated based on your future potential, not your historical background. That's a core belief at Stride. With that being said, we have products that are more traditional,
Active Learn and Admissions at UVM’s Larner College of Medicine
01-11-2022
Active Learn and Admissions at UVM’s Larner College of Medicine
All About UVM’s Larner School of Medicine [Show Summary] The University of Vermont’s Larner School of Medicine’s new Associate Dean for Admissions, Leila Amiri, shares the hallmarks of the program, including its active learning curriculum and mission centered around respect, kindness, and cultural humility. Interview with Dr. Leila Amiri, Associate Dean for Admissions at UVM Larner School of Medicine [Show Notes] Welcome to the 494th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for joining me. Are you ready to apply to your dream medical schools? Are you competitive at your target programs? Accepted's medical school admissions quiz can give you a quick reality check. Just go to accepted.com/medquiz and complete the quiz, and you'll not only get an assessment but also tips on how to improve your chances of acceptance. Plus, it's all free.  Dr. Leila Amiri, UVM Larner's new, as of June 2022, Associate Dean for Admissions, comes to Larner from the University of Illinois College of Medicine, where she was Associate Dean for Admissions and Recruitment. Previously, she was Director of Admissions and Financial Aid for the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. She holds a Ph.D. from North Central University and an MA and BS degree from the University of South Florida. Amiri is a member of the Association of American Colleges Advancing Holistic Review and Alignment Working Group, National Chair of the AAMC BA/MD Affiliate Group and National Chair for the Committee on AAMC Professional Development Initiative. Dr. Amiri was also a guest last year in her previous role, and it's a pleasure to have her back on Admissions Straight Talk. Can you give us an overview of UVM Larner's College of Medicine's program focusing on its more distinctive elements? [2:12] I'll be happy to. At Larner College of Medicine, we have a big history of training medical students. We're actually celebrating our bicentennial, so the class that's meeting for 2023 will be the 200th class that we've seated. We've come a long way in terms of the educational model. We're most known for our active learning model. Students are really at the center of our learning model and its active, student-centered learning all based on educational pedagogy and adult learning principles. There’s a lot of community engagement with our students here and at our clinical sites which are in Vermont and in Connecticut. What does active learning mean in practical terms? [3:11] When you look at educational philosophy and pedagogy, adult learners need to really be invested in what they're learning. Not only do they need to be invested in what they're learning, but they also have to find meaning and value in it. They have to be at the center of constructing the information.  There's very little lecturing that happens here for our students. There's time that they spend on their own before they come to class. Think of a flipped classroom model. They spend a lot of time on their own looking at basic information and then when they join us in the classroom setting, there’s a lot of group activity, engaging with their peers, and working through problems.  It's not completely problem-based learning, but there's problem-based learning, case-based learning, and team-based learning. We have all of these different models where students are not sitting there just as recipients of information, but really they're constructing the information with each other as they're going through the different phases of their learning. They're getting cases, they're getting problems, and they're working in teams. When you think about the way these things look, they become progressively more complex and progressively more sophisticated in terms of the case that they're engaging with. For example, they might not receive all of the information that they need, which is typical in a clinical setting. They will get a patient scenario and there'll be some gaps in that knowledge.
What was it like to be an ER doctor at the beginning of COVID?
25-10-2022
What was it like to be an ER doctor at the beginning of COVID?
ER Physician, filmmaker, popular speaker and travel company founder. Here how it all comes together [Show Summary] Dr. Calvin Sun is an emergency room physician, known for his blog-turned-travel company. During the pandemic, his travel content quickly shifted to real-time COVID updates as he chronicled his experience as an emergency room doctor in Manhattan. He has gathered all of these experiences into his newly released book, The Monsoon Diaries: A Doctor’s Journey of Hope and Healing from the ER Frontlines to the Far Reaches of the World. Interview with Dr. Calvin Sun, Founder and CEO, The Monsoon Diaries [Show Notes] Welcome for the 493rd episode of Admissions Straight Talk, Accepted's podcast. Thanks for joining me. Given the time of year, I'd like to highlight for today's listeners a wonderful resource if and when you're invited to a medical school interview, Accepted’s free download called The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success. In the guide, you learn how to prepare for interviews, including the difficult questions, how to make sure your body language matches your intent, and what is proper follow-up after your interview. Grab your free copy at accepted.com/ultimatemediv and enhance your chance of acceptance. It's really hard to summarize Dr. Calvin Sun's bio, but I'll try anyway. Calvin graduated from Columbia in 2008 and in 2014, he graduated from SUNY Downstate College of Medicine and then began his residency in emergency medicine at Montefiore and Jacobi Medical Centers. He also was the director of Resident Wellness at Jacobi. In his non-existent spare time during medical school, he somehow managed to found and now runs The Monsoon Diaries, which he describes as a blog-turned-travel company. The Monsoon Diaries organizes flexible budget trips and has gone to over 128 countries in the past six years. He's also a filmmaker, popular speaker and activist in the Asian American community emergency room physician, and, at one time at least, was a clinical assistant professor of Emergency Medicine. Listeners, I invite you to listen to accepted.com/254 for the incredible story of how Calvin Sun became Dr. Sun, founded Monsoon Diaries, the travel company, and portrays his experience as an emergency room physician in Manhattan, the corona pandemic’s epicenter in 2020. To start, I'd like to ask you how you came to write your just-released book, The Monsoon Diaries: A Doctor’s Journey of Hope and Healing from the ER Frontlines to the Far Reaches of the World. What's the story behind the book? [3:12] The story is my life in a nutshell, in a show-don't-tell fashion. It can also be seen as a love letter of gratitude because it's being released at the tail end of what we hope to be the worst or the end of the pandemic. I was approached by a literary agent two years ago. It was a totally cold approach in January 2021, and they asked if I'd be interested in writing a book. I think I had mentioned to you in our prior podcast, episode 254, that I have this habit of writing, which is what caused my Monsoon Diaries blog to turn into a community. I was writing live and blogging live on my travels while I was a full-time medical student. People started following along and it turned itself into a community.  During the pandemic, I did the same thing. We couldn't travel during the pandemic. It was not ethical, so I worked all the time, and I blogged about it in the same way I would on a trip because it was all new territory and new frontiers. That's the only thing I knew how to do to keep myself alive when I couldn't travel. It was the next best thing. People followed along, one of whom was a literary agent who then wanted to turn it into a book so I said, "Sure." One thing led to another, and two years later we now have a book published by Harper Collins in bookstores since September 27th. What do you hope people take away from The Monsoon Diaries? [4:57]
How an MBA Can Help Entrepreneurs
19-10-2022
How an MBA Can Help Entrepreneurs
Do you need an MBA as an entrepreneur? [Show Summary] What does it take to become an entrepreneur who drives impact and change? Is an MBA necessary? Inge Kerkloh-Devif, Senior Executive Director and Senior Vice President of the HEC Paris Innovation & Entrepreneurship Center, shares her thoughts. Interview with Inge Kerkloh-Devif, Sr. Exec. Dir. & Sr. Vice President of the HEC Paris Innovation & Entrepreneurship Center [Show Notes] Welcome to the 492nd episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for tuning in. Are you trying to figure out how you should approach the four to eight applications that you're planning to submit when applying to an MBA program? You can get tips and answers by taking Accepted's free, short quiz – just six questions – at accepted.com/mapmba. By taking the quiz, you'll get a sense of how well you're approaching this critical process and gain access to relevant resources, both free and paid, that will provide you with an effective and efficient strategy for your MBA application effort.  Our guest today, Inge Kerkloh-Devif, earned her masters in Marketing and Communications at HEC Paris in 2006. Since then, she worked in business in Paris and then became Executive Vice President of HEC Paris's Executive Education Program, focusing on Global Business Development. In 2019, she moved into her current role as Senior Executive Director and Senior Vice President of the HEC Paris Innovation & Entrepreneurship Center. In 2021, she added to her responsibilities the role of Co-Site Lead Executive at the Creative Destruction Lab in Paris in partnership with the Innovation & Entrepreneurship Center. hbspt.cta.load(58291, '9bb31be0-3cf6-45f0-be3d-3791cc1bd9bd', {}); Can you tell us a little bit about both HEC's Innovation & Entrepreneurship Center and the Creative Destruction Lab in Paris? [2:11] Of course. The Innovation & Entrepreneurship Center is the whole ecosystem we have built as a school around innovators and entrepreneurs. As we say, we think, we teach, and we act around innovation and entrepreneurship. That means we do research on innovation and entrepreneurship. We have more than 20 programs we are teaching at the school to teach innovation and entrepreneurship to our students. And we have all of our incubator acceleration programs, so students are learning by doing. Entrepreneurship is really part of the DNA of the school.  The Creative Destruction Lab, or CDL, was founded 10 years ago in Toronto, Canada at the Rotman Management School. They're now partnering with 12 universities all over the world to offer this objective-based program from massively scalable, seed-stage science and technology-based companies. It's really an acceleration program for deep tech. The program has an intake from more than 600 companies per year. We have one lab in Paris, we have one lab on climate, and one lab on space. What's the difference between deep tech and tech? [4:15] Very good question. I think I can give 10 different answers to this. For us, we can see this really emerging more and more in engineering and scientific projects. Those are really long-term projects. We are working with scientists and engineers to get these projects to grow. For us, it's specifically based on scientific and engineering projects to give this deep tech long-term projects. When I say we are working with scientists and engineers, they're coming out of the laboratories. It's very research-based.  If I have a business idea, or maybe I don't yet have a business idea, but I know that I want to be an entrepreneur at some point in my career, how can an MBA help me succeed? [5:33] I think of these as two different stages.  If you already have your idea or if you're just joining an MBA, what we can see is very often, students are launching their business or their ideas a little bit after completing their MBA. They learn all the basics, they build their network,
Encore: All You Want to Know About Georgetown Medical School’s Admissions
12-10-2022
Encore: All You Want to Know About Georgetown Medical School’s Admissions
Welcome to the 491st episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for joining me. I am taking a week off for family time this week. As a result, I decided to air an encore of one of our most popular shows of 2022: All You Want to Know About Georgetown Medical School’s Admissions. I chose this interview with Dr. Ellen Dugan, Senior Associate Dean for Admissions and Financial Aid at Georgetown University School of Medicine not only because of its popularity, but because Dean Dugan gave wonderful insight not only into Georgetown’s admissions process, but into what many schools seek through their admission process. If you like this episode and want to test out whether you are competitive at your target medical schools, take the free Medical School Admissions Quiz at accepted.com/medquiz. It’s a brief assessment that will give you valuable information into your competitiveness as well as suggestions for improving your qualifications and competitiveness. Take it today at accepted.com/medquiz. Thanks as always for listening to Admissions Straight Talk. I’ll talk to you again next week! In the meantime, here is All You Want to Know About Georgetown Medical School’s Admissions with Dean Ellen Dugan. For the complete show notes, check out the original blog post. Related links: Georgetown University School of MedicineMed School Admissions Quiz Are you competitive?Georgetown University School of Medicine Secondary Application Essay TipsAccepted’s Med School Admissions Consulting Services Related shows: How To Get Accepted To Washington University School Of Medicine in St. LouisAn Interview With the Temple Katz School of Medicine Admissions DeanU Penn Perelman School of Medicine: Interview with Admissions Dean, Dr. Neha VapiwalaUW School of Medicine: Interview with Admissions Dean, Dr. LeeAnna MuzquizAre You Rushing to Attend Rush Medical CollegeWhat Med School Applicants Must Know About Johns HopkinsDeep Dive Into Duke Medical: An Interview With Dr. Linton Yee, Associate Dean of Admissions hbspt.cta.load(58291, '6f21f36c-c988-4e9c-b947-0b9d4af1557f', {"region":"na1"});
The Only Online Ivy League Executive MBA Program
04-10-2022
The Only Online Ivy League Executive MBA Program
Find out what's new at Wharton's Global EMBA program [Show Summary] Wharton’s first-ever online Global MBA Program for Executives is here and Dean Peggy Bishop Lane is diving into everything this exciting program has to offer for students across the globe. Interview with Peggy Bishop Lane, Vice Dean of the Wharton MBA Program for Executives [Show Notes] Welcome to the 490th episode of Admissions Straight Talk, Accepted's podcast. Thanks for tuning in. Before I dive into today's interview, I want to invite you to download Ace the EMBA: Expert Advice for the Rising Executive. This free guide will complement today's podcast and give you suggestions on how to choose the right Executive MBA program, differentiate yourself from your competition in a positive way, and present yourself effectively as a future business leader who will bring credit to any program lucky enough to have you. Download Ace the EMBA at accepted.com/aceemba. It gives me great pleasure to have, for the first time on Admissions Straight Talk, Peggy Bishop Lane, the Vice Dean of the Wharton MBA Program for Executives. Dean Bishop Lane earned her PhD in Accounting from Northwestern University. She started her professorial career at NYU Stern and then moved to Wharton in 1997. She has been the Vice Dean for the MBA Program for Executives and an Adjunct Professor of Accounting since 2012. To start, can you give an overview of the Wharton Global Executive MBA program, focusing on its more distinctive elements? [2:14] Absolutely. I think the main thing to know is that we intend for this global cohort to look very much like our existing Philadelphia and San Francisco cohorts. It's going to be the same curriculum with essentially the same faculty and the same admissions requirements. I hope that it's actually more similar to what people already know about our program than it is different.  Of course, what's unique is that you don't have to be in-person every other weekend as you do in Philadelphia and San Francisco. What we've created is a remote opportunity to do our program. With that said, it's very important to us that it's not fully remote because we know how important an in-person experience can be to the student experience.  The truly unique part for us is the residential factor here, and we've got six different residential weeks that we've incorporated into the program. The first two are purposely very close together because we want the students to create some relationships and then solidify them very shortly after. Right now, our Philadelphia and San Francisco cohorts start together in Philadelphia and we're going to start our Global cohort with them. So all three groups will start at the same time for about a week in Philadelphia, and our Global cohort will stay on a little bit longer to give them that opportunity to really get to know each other well. Then about three months later, we'll bring them back together in San Francisco. They'll get to see that campus and feel the connection to our group out in San Francisco for about a week as well. The third week to cap off their first year together will probably be in some location outside of the United State, but it’s still to be determined. Then we'll have three more residential weeks in the second year so that they can keep those bonds really alive. hbspt.cta.load(58291, '088cf431-34b3-4030-9c1e-432eee48f613', {}); Are the last three residential weeks intended to be in Philadelphia, San Francisco, or somewhere else? [4:29] The first one will be another one where they get to interact with our Philadelphia and San Francisco students. We just finished what's called our Global Business Week, where we send our affiliates in San Francisco students to their choice of four different locations. We split them up, we mix them together, and we're going to add a fifth location and then bring the global cohort into that. They'll do that in September of their second year.
How to Get Into Georgetown Law
28-09-2022
How to Get Into Georgetown Law
Dreaming of a spot at Georgetown Law? Here's all you need to know [Show Summary] It’s hard to get a law education any closer to the heartbeat of policy and legal action than at Washington D.C.’s Georgetown Law School, labeled by the Washington Post as “the country’s most popular law school.” Andrew Cornblatt, the Dean of Admissions explains exactly what it takes to get accepted to this top-ranked and highly competitive program. Interview with Andrew Cornblatt, Dean of Admissions at Georgetown Law [Show Notes] Thanks for joining me for the 489th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Are you applying to law school this cycle? Are you planning ahead to apply to law school next year or perhaps later? Are you competitive at your target programs? Accepted's Law School Admissions Quiz can give you a quick reality check. Just go to accepted.com/law-quiz, complete the quiz, and you'll not only get an assessment but also tips on how to improve your chances of acceptance. Plus it's all free.  For today's interview, I'm delighted to have Andrew Cornblatt, Metta and Keith Krach Dean of Admissions and Associate Vice President of Graduate Admissions and Enrollment at Georgetown Law. A graduate of Harvard University and Boston College School of Law, Dean Cornblatt has been a member of the Georgetown community since 1980. He became Dean of Admissions at Georgetown Law in 1991 and served as Dean of Admissions at the Georgetown Public Policy Institute, now the McCourt School of Public Policy from 2002 to 2016. It's hard to find someone with more experience in admissions. Can you give an overview of the more distinctive elements of the Georgetown Law School JD program? [2:36] I think the two things that are most unique about Georgetown are its size and its location. Georgetown Law is a large law school. I think it's among the largest in the United States, with 575 entering students. Even though it’s a big law school, we work very hard to make it a big law school with a small law school feel. These are small classes and the campus is beautiful. It's like a small college with lots of different buildings. We pay particular attention to individual students and their needs. We have big programs, but we have individual people who deserve individual attention and that's what we focus on.  As far as location goes, we’re right at the heart of Washington D.C. in the center of law in the USA. This is where everything gets made, interpreted, enforced, and implemented. That all happens within a 10-block radius of where I'm sitting right now in my office. When you have that as a resource, and that's available to you, it enhances the electricity of what you're studying. It's hands-on stuff, but it allows Georgetown to be at the crossroads of theory and practice. When I went to law school all those years ago, and when people go to law school now, so much of it is about the theory of law and what happened way back then and cases from the 1800s. All of that's important. I'm not saying it isn't. But this generation of law students is hands-on. They watch it happen on video. They stay attuned to every development every 10th of a second through social media and all of the alerts they get. This is a place that's right at the center of all of that. That's part of our course structure too. The plus side of being at a big law school is you have that many more courses from which to choose. But if you want to know where the heart is beating, it's right outside my window. I think that's what excites students when they come here. What are some of the programs that are unique to Georgetown Law because of its location? [5:39] Let me give you two, even though there are probably 200.  So first, all law schools have clinical programs. It's a sort of supervised practice where you represent clients. All the clinics are different. Georgetown has the most in the country. This is an expensive education, but we are committed to doing this.
Approaching Your MBA Application
20-09-2022
Approaching Your MBA Application
Expert tips on how to approach your MBA application [Show Summary] What’s the right way to approach an MBA application? Like a productivity challenge? A jigsaw puzzle? A to-do list? Linda Abraham weighs in and shares her expert tips to master this process.  Linda Abraham, Founder and CEO of Accepted, shares her insights into how best to approach your MBA application [Show Notes] Welcome to the 487th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for joining me. Today is going to be a solo show where I answer common questions while also providing information on how to approach your MBA application. If you're not applying for an MBA, there's still going to be a lot for you to learn from this episode, specifically from its strategic approach to the application process and its focus on using every element of the application to your advantage, not to mention thinking about where you want to end up after you get the degree. For you, MBAs, when you finish listening to this episode, you're invited to take a free six-question quiz at Accepted.com/MapMBA to see how well you've absorbed the lessons in this show. You'll also gain access to other relevant resources, both free and paid, that you can use as you attempt to incorporate the advice contained in this podcast into your strategy for a successful MBA application.  I realize it is an enormous effort to apply successfully to an MBA program, especially if you're applying to top MBA programs with acceptance rates like 6%, 10%, and 20%. That means they reject the overwhelming majority of applicants who submit applications. Indeed, the elite programs reject many, if not most, admissible candidates. You have a challenge, even if you have good stats, and that challenge is even greater if you don't. Actually, it's really a few challenges: How can you make your application as impressive as possible?How are you going to tell your story and effectively present the non-statistical elements of your application, specifically the essays and, when necessary, a video?How can you make the process efficient? Those are the questions I'm going to address. Listen in. There's a lot to cover here. How to choose the right schools [2:47] The foundation of any effective application process is choosing the right schools to apply to. In order to determine what those schools are, you must have professional direction, defined for MBAs as having a preferred industry in which you want to work and a function you would like to perform. Note that this is not necessarily what you want to study. It's different. The basic question is, where do you want to end up? What's your goal for the MBA? Because that goal, or direction, becomes your north star in the application process and when you arrive on campus. You also need competitive academic qualifications. You're going to have to show through your application that you can handle both the communications and quantitative demands of a top MBA program. These qualifications are usually revealed via your transcript and your test score, but they can also be revealed via certifications and work experience, your application itself, your writing, and your interview.  The third thing you're going to need is a sense of what's important to you in an MBA program. It might be location. This can also be a part of your professional direction. For example, you may want to work in London or you might want to work on Wall Street or you might want to work in Silicon Valley. Those are more professional, goal-oriented location questions. What I'm talking about is just personal preference. Do you prefer being in a small city or a big city? Do you prefer a warm climate or a cold climate? Do you have a significant other whose work and preferences you need to account for? Do you prefer to be close to your family or far from your family? You’ll also have to consider instructional focus and curriculum: case versus experiential learning versus a combination of cas...
How to Get Accepted to Cornell Johnson MBA
13-09-2022
How to Get Accepted to Cornell Johnson MBA
Tune in to hear all that Cornell Johnson's dynamic MBA program has to offer, and more [Show Summary] Eddie Asbie, Executive Director of Admissions and Scholarship at Cornell Johnson Graduate School of Management, dives into this dynamic program that equips students for careers in finance, tech, healthcare, and more.  Interview with Eddie Asbie, Executive Director of Admissions and Scholarship at Cornell Johnson Graduate School of Management [Show Notes] Welcome to the 488th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for tuning in. Before we speak with our wonderful guest, I want to invite you to take advantage of a fantastic tool at Accepted, the MBA Admissions Quiz. Are you ready to apply to your dream MBA programs? Are you competitive at those programs? Accepted's MBA Admissions Quiz can not only give you a quick reality check, but also tips on how to improve your qualifications. Plus, it's all free. Use the calculator at accepted.com/mbaquiz. It gives me great pleasure to have, for the first time on Admissions Straight Talk, Eddie Asbie, Executive Director of Admissions and Scholarship at Cornell Johnson Graduate School of Management. Eddie earned his bachelor's in communications from the University at Buffalo and a masters from SUNY Buffalo in Student Personnel Administration. Between his undergraduate and graduate degrees, he worked at SUNY Buffalo and while in grad school, he served as an Admissions Advisor at the University of Buffalo. He joined the Johnson School in 2012 as an Assistant Director of Admissions and Financial Aid and became the Executive Director of Admissions and Scholarship in June 2021.  Can you give an overview of the Cornell Johnson full-time MBA program, focusing on its more distinctive elements? [2:16] We're located in Ithaca, New York, which is in central New York. Our MBA program is a general management MBA program that allows our students to really get the basic business fundamentals while also expanding personally and professionally throughout their career goals. We are known for elements of our program, such as our immersion learning program, which gives our students the opportunity to immerse themselves in their particular career paths. This happens in the spring semester of their first year. It gives students that hands-on experience while taking advanced level courses in their particular immersions so they can ultimately be able to hit the ground running with the internship itself. We also have Cornell Tech, MBA program located in New York City. If you are looking for a residential two-year program, there are opportunities for our program to collaborate with the Cornell Tech campus in New York City.  There are a lot of other great features like flexibility in the program to work with other departments. Our program really gives you the opportunity to customize the program the way you best see fit. We understand it's a business school, but we also understand the direction that our students are going into spans so many different industries, whether it is hospitality, healthcare, tech, or anything else. We have some great programs here at Cornell that allow students to be able to tap into other areas. Is there anything new at Cornell Johnson that you'd like to highlight? [4:49] I will say that within my time here at Johnson, we've done a pretty good job of making sure that we stay relevant with what's happening and changes to our curriculum. One of the new exciting things that I would like to share is the opportunity to do a 1+1 program, which is a full year here in Ithaca, along with a full year at Cornell Tech. This program gives our students, who are applying to the two-year residential MBA program, the opportunity of going through the standard core in the first semester and during a tech-focused immersion experience in the second semester. Then in the second year, you would join the Cornell Tech students, focusing on their startup curriculum where you'...
How to Get Accepted to Graduate Engineering Programs
06-09-2022
How to Get Accepted to Graduate Engineering Programs
All you need to know when applying to graduate engineering programs [Show Summary] How should you approach an application to a graduate engineering program? Dr. Karin Ash, a top-notch admissions consultant and career coach for aspiring engineers, shares everything you need to know.  Interview with Dr. Karin Ash, Accepted consultant and former Dir. of the Career Management Center at Cornell’s Johnson School, career coach at Cornell’s College of Engineering, and Dir. of Cornell Career Services [Show Notes] Welcome to the 486th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for tuning in. Do you know how to get accepted to graduate engineering programs? Dr. Karin Ash does, and she shares her knowledge and insight in Accepted's guide, “Applying to Engineering Programs: What You Need to Know.” Download your free copy at accepted.com/486download.  Our guest today is Dr. Karin Ash, author of the guide that I just mentioned, and the former Director of Cornell University's Career Services, Director of the Career Management Center at Cornell Johnson School, and a career coach at Cornell's College of Engineering. Dr. Ash joined Accepted in 2015 as an admissions consultant and career coach. She has been guiding clients to acceptance at leading masters and PhD programs in engineering at top universities, including UC Berkeley, Carnegie Mellon, Cal Tech, Cambridge University, Columbia, Cornell, Duke Georgetown, Harvard, MIT, Northwestern, NYU, Stanford, UCLA, USC, University of Michigan, UT, UVA, and University of Washington, among others. She's here to discuss how to get accepted to graduate engineering programs. Much of your experience before joining Accepted was in the career guidance side of graduate and undergraduate education, how do employers influence admissions decisions? [2:16] They can influence it in a couple of ways. Let's say all of a sudden, a lot of employers decide they need more computer scientists. The programs at a university might expand the number of candidates that they are willing to bring in. It can also make a difference if they emphasize certain areas within an academic area. For example, they can say they need more calculus because the new hires are coming in with not as much math skills as they might need. So they can affect the curriculum.  The other way is if I'm sitting on an admissions committee and I going through files trying to decide who should be interviewed for a possible spot and an applicant’s story seems very clear, and it seems like they would not have a hard time finding employment. It can make a difference if I think the story doesn't make sense, and I don't think they're going to have an easy time getting employment. It doesn't mean they're totally out of the picture, but I might put them in another pile because schools get ranked somewhat based on what percentage of graduates find employment and what their salary level is. Those are some ways employers can influence admissions. I think teamwork has been a skill that employers have increasingly valued over the last 20-40 years. Is that something schools are emphasizing more in admissions decisions? [4:19] Absolutely. That's a good point, Linda. I think that's been true in the MBA world for quite a while, but with engineers, more and more companies are insisting that people work on teams. They realize that there's more productivity and a more creative outcome when you have diverse teams working together, not only within a department but across departments. You can get into a school without having great leadership or communication skills, but if you have them, it's an asset and there's more assurity that you'll get in. It also depends on the department. If you're being hired for a coding position, it's going to be less important than if you're being hired for operations management or civil engineering, where you're dealing with construction sites and architects, and you've got to be able to communicate across many dif...
How To Get Accepted To Washington University School Of Medicine in St. Louis
30-08-2022
How To Get Accepted To Washington University School Of Medicine in St. Louis
What's new at Washington University School of Medicine? [Show Summary] Dr. Valerie Ratts, Associate Dean for Admissions at Washington University School of Medicine, shares what's new in the program, including the Gateway Curriculum and the virtual interview experience.  Interview with Dr. Valerie Ratts, Associate Dean for Admissions at Washington University School of Medicine [Show Notes] Welcome to the 485th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for joining me today. Are you ready to apply to your dream medical schools? Are you competitive at your target programs? Accepted's Med School Admissions Quiz can give you a quick reality check. Just go to accepted.com/medquiz, complete the quiz, and you will not only get an assessment, but also tips on how to improve your chances of acceptance. Plus, it's all free.  Today's guest, Dr. Valerie Ratts, earned her MD at Johns Hopkins, where she also did her residency in obstetrics and gynecology as well as a fellowship in reproductive endocrinology. She joined the Washington University faculty in 1994 and currently serves as Associate Dean for Admissions and a Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Washington University School of Medicine.  Can you give us an overview of the WashU School of Medicine program focusing on its more distinctive elements? [1:52] Well, actually, our curriculum has changed since I last spoke to you. We're very excited about it. It's called the Gateway Curriculum. We're reimagining how we should best be educating medical students for the future and we deliver that in three phases. In phase one, we concentrate on the fundamentals and foundational modules in medicine. But we're integrating it the entire time. When you're getting basic science courses, we're integrating clinical problems, social sciences, health equity, and justice. All of those things come up during phase one. We also have clinical immersions during that period where students go into the clinical spaces for three weeks at three times during phase one. They’ll go to inpatient, outpatient, and peri-procedural spaces. The goal is not to be the physician. Yes, you get some clinical skills. Yes, you see how the different units work. But the goal is to get a perspective of how all the other healthcare providers in that space, including social workers, nurses, and pharmacists, work together. We think that medical students, at that point in their education, haven't quite learned all the bad habits that physicians get. They have a very unique perspective. We have small group sessions where the medical students will meet with other medical students and their professors to talk about the things that they observed in those spaces, good and bad. The thought is that when they become the physician down the road, they can reflect upon that period of time, and it will hopefully make them better doctors in the future. That's one of the things that we're doing in phase one, getting them very quickly into the clinical spaces and using that unique perspective that an early medical student has.  Then we have phase two. This is the gateway to clinical medicine. This is when students rotate through the six big specialties in medicine, OB/GYN, medicine, surgery, neurology, pediatrics, and psychiatry. All medical schools require you to rotate through these clinical services. You're basically trying on all the hats to learn what type of medicine you really enjoy. What we do uniquely in this phase of the curriculum is we have the clerkship start with bookends. In the beginning, we review foundational modules and science that we first taught in phase one that is applicable to the clerkship that you're going to be engaged in. We are reviewing that medicine to help you remember it, understand it, and to better apply it. This is this helical learning that we've integrated into our curriculum, and it seems to work really well. Then the students go,
How to Get Accepted to UCLA Anderson
23-08-2022
How to Get Accepted to UCLA Anderson
Everything you need to know about the UCLA Anderson MBA program [Show Summary] Alex Lawrence, UCLA Anderson’s Assistant Dean for MBA Admissions explores the hallmarks of the program and discusses what makes a competitive application.  Interview with Alex Lawrence, Asst. Dean of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid at UCLA Anderson School of Management [Show Notes] Welcome to the 484th episode of Admissions Straight Talk, Accepted's podcast. Thanks for tuning in. Before we get to our wonderful guest, I want to invite you to take advantage of a fantastic tool at Accepted, the MBA Admissions Quiz. Are you ready to apply to your dream MBA programs? Are you competitive at those programs? Accepted's MBA Admissions Quiz can give you a quick reality check. Just complete the quiz, which should only take about five minutes, and you'll not only get an assessment but also tips on how to actually improve your qualifications. Plus, it's all free. hbspt.cta.load(58291, 'a7004604-d7d1-4d1f-98ef-a0ec53d7e590', {}); It gives me great pleasure to have back on Admissions Straight Talk Alex Lawrence, Assistant Dean of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid at UCLA Anderson School of Management, which just happens to be where I earned my MBA. Alex is a fellow Anderson alum who earned his MBA in 1999. Prior to that, he earned a bachelor's in Electrical Engineering. After earning his MBA, he worked in management consulting for four years and then returned to UCLA Anderson as Director of the Riordan Program. In 2012, he became first the director and then the Assistant Dean for MBA Admissions.  Can you give an overview of the Anderson full-time MBA program for those listeners who aren't that familiar with it, focusing on its more distinctive element? [2:15] The UCLA Anderson MBA is obviously near and dear to my heart, being an alumnus of the program and now running the admission side of things. My relationship with the school goes back over 25 years.It’s a two-year program that balances the opportunity to go through the traditional core elements while also taking what you learn in the classroom to actually participate in a number of different experiential or practicum types of activities. We actually started school yesterday and today is day two for the class of 2024.  One of the things I think shows how we're always innovating in our program is that beyond traditional summer internships, more and more of our students are doing academic internships. Part of the graduation requirements is to satisfy a global requirement. Our students have been taking on some of those different opportunities for almost 10 years now, where they do a consulting project with a global company or perhaps they travel overseas.  We're a smallish class size of around 330 students. We don't necessarily look at students with just a business background. It's really diverse domestically, internationally, and across genders also career interests as well. We have students who go to a lot of different areas, not just consulting and finance, but real estate, entertainment, and more. We're always trying to push the envelope, and we added a course in ethics to the core classes students need to take in order to graduate. Students have to participate in that. In our career services, there's a required class as well that our students have to take. There are a lot of different elements. Once you peel back the layers and learn more about Anderson, there's a lot to find out. I hope we'll get a chance to talk about a lot of that and more. How does the Anderson course in ethics differ from traditional corporate social responsibility courses? [5:08] Many times ethics are woven into some other elements of the curriculum like elective courses or case studies. Before the pandemic, we were working with students, who we always work hand-in-hand with to innovate our curriculum, and they wanted to create an all-day conference on ethics that would include a case competition ...
University of Michigan's Ross MBA program: Everything You Need to Know
16-08-2022
University of Michigan's Ross MBA program: Everything You Need to Know
What’s new at Michigan Ross? [Show Summary] Taya Sapp, Senior Associate Director of Admissions, shares all of the latest updates including a new dean, new testing policy, and a new essay question. Interview with Taya Sapp, Senior Associate Director of Admissions at Michigan Ross School of Business [Show Notes] Welcome to the 479th episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for listening. You've seen the stats that most people have a great return on their MBA investment, but what about you? Are you going to see that return? And how much will it be? We've created a tool that will help you assess whether the MBA is likely to be a good investment for you individually. Just go to accepted.com/mbaroicalc, complete the brief questionnaire, and you will not only get an assessment but also the opportunity to calculate different scenarios. And it's all free.  It gives me great pleasure to have on Admissions Straight Talk for the first time Taya Sapp, Senior Associate Director of Admissions at Michigan Ross School of Business. Taya practically bleeds Michigan blue. She graduated from the University of Michigan with a bachelor's degree in American Culture in 2003 and then worked as an Admissions Counselor at another college for several years before returning to Michigan. She joined the admissions staff at Michigan Ross in 2011, rose through the ranks, and today is the Senior Associate Director of Admissions.  Could you start with a basic overview of Ross's full-time MBA program for listeners who may not be that familiar with it, focusing on its more distinctive elements? [2:09] I think the one thing that we are really known for is learning by doing. I always like to tell people if you learn best by doing, there's no better place to be than Michigan Ross. I can give a couple of examples of that. The cornerstone is MAP which stands for Multidisciplinary Action Projects. It's a seven-week consulting project that every single student does at the end of their first year at Ross. This past year we had projects with Blue Origin, a social responsibility project with Amazon, and we also had nonprofit students analyzing data sets to help design fundraising campaigns. There’s a pretty big variety in the projects. It's a huge differentiator for us because students spend a full seven weeks doing it and then get to do their internship. A lot of times, people think of it as almost two internships. It's also a great opportunity for travel. We did start sending people internationally again this year, and the nice thing is the sponsor covers all travel expenses. Can you tell us a little more about what's new in the Ross MBA program? [3:33] We have a new Dean starting on August 1st. We are really excited to have her come to Ross and see her vision for leading our community here. There are a few other things I'm excited about. We started something called the Business+Tech initiative this past year which is a hub for everything tech. They launched a tech literacy week, which is basically a bunch of workshops to help people orient themselves to different areas of tech. It covers everything from how a lack of diversity can impact artificial intelligence to boot camps and machine learning and different programs like Python and Blockchain. They’re really helping prepare students for not just the recruiting aspect but also the actual knowledge in tech. We have seven different student investment funds at Ross, and the newest one just started this year. It's called the Michigan Clean Venture, and it's focused on clean tech investments. I think it’s really exciting that our students saw a need for that, and we were able to launch it this past year.  I'm really excited to see both of those growing. there anything that you think people generally don't realize about Ross that you'd like them to know or any myths you want to dispel? [5:09]
An Inside Look at The Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine
09-08-2022
An Inside Look at The Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine
Wondering if you're a good fit for the Geisinger Commonwealth SOM? [Show Summary] Dr. Michelle Schmude, Associate Dean of Admissions at Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, shares everything that’s new in the program, including a revised curriculum and a unique opportunity that allows students to graduate debt free.  Interview with Dr. Michelle Schmude, Associate Dean of Admissions at Geisinger Commonwealth SOM [Show Notes] Welcome to the 482nd episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for tuning in. Do you know how to get accepted to medical school? Well, Dr. Suzi Schweikert does, and she shares her knowledge and insight in Accepted's free guide, Med School Admissions: What You Need to Know to Get Accepted. Download your free copy at accepted.com/482download. Today's guest, Dr. Michelle Schmude, has spent her career in higher ed administration and med school admissions. After earning her BA in History and Business, she went on to earn an MBA and then a Doctorate in Education from Wilkes University. Since 1996, she has worked in admissions, first as Dean of Full-Time Admissions at Point Park University, then at Kings College, and since 2015, as Director and then as Associate Dean of Admissions, Enrollment Management and Financial Aid at Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine. She's also an Associate Professor of Medical Education at Geisinger. Now that you know a little bit about Dr. Schmude, let's find out about Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine and its admissions policies.  Can you give us an overview of the Geisinger Commonwealth Med School program focusing on its more distinctive elements? [1:57] Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine offers the MD degree, which is the Doctorate of Medicine, and we are an allopathic medical school. We are located in Scranton, Pennsylvania, and we were founded in 2008 as the Commonwealth Medical College, which transformed into Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine in 2017. Right now, we enroll 115 students in each medical school class. Our MD curriculum is known as the Total Health Curriculum, and it is divided into three phases. The first phase prepares our students in terms of the principles of medical sciences and practices. The second phase would be our core clinical immersion. And the last phase is our career differentiation and exploration, which prepares students for the transition to residency. Also, highlighted within our MD curriculum and our Total Health curriculum, we have six longitudinal themes, where our students are immersed in Health Equity and Justice, Personal and Professional Development, Health System Citizenship, Primary Care, Community Immersion, and Population Health. These themes are interwoven throughout the four years of our medical school program in both our basic sciences as well as our clinical sciences. Are the themes something that a student chooses to focus on or does everybody cover all six themes through the three stages? [3:44] That's a great question. All of our students participate in the six themes. Additionally, our students participate in active learning sessions. In our medical school curriculum, along with the six themes, we do not have any lectures. So our students prepare ahead of time and they come to class as active participants in their learning experiences. They’ll engage in small groups, workshops, reflection, and case-based learning. They also engage in early clinical experiences, and those experiences do have the six themes woven throughout. It sounds like it's very much of a flipped classroom kind of experience. [4:39] It absolutely is a flipped classroom. We assume our students come to class prepared because they are provided with all of the materials ahead of time. They have that knowledge and they are able to engage in these active learning experiences to help further their understanding and application of the course content.
Ace the Executive Assessment
02-08-2022
Ace the Executive Assessment
Tune in to hear all you need to know about the Executive Assessment [Show Summary] Who is the Executive Assessment for? What is it? And how to prepare for it? Introduced by GMAC a few years ago, for the Executive MBA, the “EA” has gained credibility and acceptability for a variety of MBA programs. Brett Ethridge, test prep expert, weighs in and answers all these questions in this informative interview.  Interview with Brett Ethridge, founder and president of Dominate Test Prep [Show Notes] Welcome to the 483rd episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for listening. You've seen the stats that most people have a great return on their MBA investment. But what about you? Are you going to see that return? How much could it be? We've created a tool that will help you assess whether the MBA is likely to be a good investment for you individually. Just go to accepted.com/mbaroicalc, complete the brief questionnaire, and you’ll not only get an assessment but also the opportunity to calculate different scenarios. And it's all free.  Try the MBA ROI Calculator! It gives me great pleasure to have back on Admissions Straight Talk, Brett Ethridge, founder and president of Dominate Test Prep. Brett earned his Bachelor's in Public Policy Studies from Duke in 2000 and then joined the Peace Corps for two years where he worked in Madagascar. He then earned a Master's in International Finance, Trade, and Economic Integration from the University of Denver. In 2010, he founded Dominate the GMAT, which became Dominate Test Prep. Today, Dominate Test Prep provides test preparation for the GMAT, the GRE, SAT, ACT, LSAT, and most importantly for today's conversation, GMAC's Executive Assessment. The Executive Assessment is accepted by many Executive MBA programs, an increasing number of part-time MBA programs, and even several highly ranked full-time MBA programs, including Columbia, Darden, Duke Fuqua, Georgetown, NYU Stern, UT McCombs, and Vanderbilt. Let's learn all about the Executive Assessment.  Let's start with a basic question. What is the Executive Assessment? [2:42] It's a standardized test used as part of the admissions process for a wide range of primarily Executive MBA programs in the United States, but also overseas. It’s also being used by an increasing number of online MBA programs, part-time MBA programs, and full-time MBA programs. It's very similar in a lot of ways to the GMAT exam, which is the widely used entrance exam for business school, but different in distinct ways as well. In short, it's a standardized test that a lot of students are taking right now to get into various MBA programs. Why did GMAC develop the Executive Assessment if it already had the GMAT? [3:32] Because they were asked to (if the story is correct). I actually first learned about the Executive Assessment myself at a forum that the GMAC hosted at their headquarters in Ruston, Virginia back in 2018. I think the Executive Assessment had been around for maybe a year or so at that point. It's a fairly new exam at four or five years old. It was my first time really learning about the exam. At that point, only a couple dozen schools were even using it.  The story they told us, so this is straight from the GMAC's mouth, is that the admissions directors at a lot of the top executive MBA programs came to them and said, "Look, we love the GMAT. We're currently asking applicants for our Executive MBA programs to take the GMAT. But it's a really steep hurdle in the application process for a demographic of applicants who are in their forties, sometimes fifties. These people have been out of school for decades and now you're asking them to do the advanced math that's on the GMAT and spend months and months and months preparing. Can you come up with something that's a slightly lower barrier to entry? Not in terms of being easier, necessarily. We want to make sure that the applicants have the quantitative chops and also verbal reasonin...
How to Prep for the MCAT
26-07-2022
How to Prep for the MCAT
Expert tips for MCAT success [Show Summary] Todd Bennett, co-founder of The Berkeley Review and expert MCAT instructor, shares his best tips for preparing for and taking the test.  Todd Bennett, co-founder of The Berkeley Review and expert MCAT instructor [Show Notes] Welcome to the 480th episode of Admissions Straight Talk, thanks for joining me. Before I introduce our guest today, I'd like to invite you to take Accepted's Med School Admissions Quiz. Ask yourself, "Am I ready to apply to my dream medical schools? Am I competitive at my target programs?" Accepted's Med School Admissions Quiz can give you a quick reality check, just go to accepted.com/medquiz, complete the quiz, and you'll not only get an assessment but also actionable tips on how to improve your chances of acceptance. Plus, it's all free.  hbspt.cta.load(58291, '6f21f36c-c988-4e9c-b947-0b9d4af1557f', {"region":"na1"}); Our guest today is Todd Bennett, whom I met many years ago. He was, at the time, the CEO of the Berkeley Review, and for the entire time, since I met him those many moons ago, he's been an expert MCAT instructor, both for the Berkeley Review and on his own.  Is there anything new in terms of the MCAT and the MCAT prep world since we last spoke about a year ago? [1:55] Well, the biggest thing is that COVID restrictions have basically simmered away and it's no longer the same concern it was. The content hasn't seemed to change much, but the delivery and all the stress and weird times looks like it's just going to go back to the regular shot. So that's the biggest thing. There are still some basic protocols, but it's so much less stressful than it was during the pandemic. How do you recommend students prepare for the MCAT? [2:42] The biggest thing at the very start is to look at what you're studying. The only company that puts out realistic questions that have been on the MCAT, or are very similar, is the AAMC. It’s the company that is responsible for the test. Start with their materials. They have an MCAT guide that's the best thing on the market. All these people with “super secrets” are pretty much just people who've read that book from start to finish. They're pretty straightforward in what percentages of the questions they give, how they ask their questions, and what they're looking for. If you start there and really analyze and break that down, you will realize that you don't have to know the material at the same level you studied for college. It's not that it's harder or easier. It's different in that you have to apply it. I'll take physics, for instance. It’s one of the topics I taught for many years. In college, people memorize equations, learn to do problems, show their work, box their answer, and pray for partial credit. That's physics in a nutshell. On the MCAT, they're going to talk about some experiment they do in biochemistry with some machine that uses an electric field, and they'll want to know, "What's true of this electric field if we turn up the voltage", or, "What's true if we move the plates further apart or closer together?" Suddenly you have to take that physics, and apply it to a bio experiment.  Getting used to that is the hardest thing I find people have to do. They spend so much time memorizing facts that they never take time to get used to what the questions and passages are like, and they get shocked when they start doing AAMC materials. It’s the number one reason why people postpone or have to repeat. My best advice is to start with the real deal, analyze it, learn what you can from it, and then start your study. How much time should an applicant budget for MCAT prep? [4:42] It starts with an honest look in the mirror and assessing what you know and what you don't know. How did you take your class? Did you take one of those notoriously easy online classes? Or did you take a more challenging class? Figure out what you know and how much you've covered.  In general,